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Thread: Psychology of driving vs non

  1. #1
    Cyburbian circusoflife's avatar
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    Psychology of driving vs non

    Does anyone know about any psychological studies that compare the traits and behavior between people who need to drive everyday/regularly vs those in say a country who have never learned to drive, or who drive once in a blue moon if that.

    Comparison factors might be the different affect on men vs women. Like aggression vs gentleness or masculine / femininity balance.
    - Beware more of the man in the fancy cloak, than the one in tattered clothing -

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    I don't know of any specifically concerning driving vs non-driving. But there are some books about time that you might find relevant. I can't think of a title right now. Modern American society is extremely obsessed with time -- being on time, making things faster, etc. This is partly entertwined with the commuter lifestyle. There are significant psychological and social differences between a society where there is so much time pressure and societies that live at a "slower pace". My personal experience is that a slower pace -- which would including walking and taking public transit instead of owning a car -- is more humane. People are more relationship oriented. They take the time to listen to you. They take the time to pursue quality of life rather than quantity. Quality takes time. A good meal takes time to prepare and a deep, meaningful relationship takes time to develop, etc.

    So my suggestion would be that you look for books and articles about our "hurried society". The tie in to transportation is pretty direct: standardized time zones were created to accommodate the national rail system -- so that you could have a meaningful schedule. Before that, "noon" was when the sun was directly overhead and each town was on a slightly different time, as dictated by the clock tower in the town square. So when the rail line crossed the continent, they had real problems with trying to communicate to people when the trains would arrive and depart. The trains did not run "on time" until everyone in the nation was on the same page, time-wise.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Are you trying to say that women can't drive?

    Ducks from the frying pan

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    Are you trying to say that women can't drive?

    Ducks from the frying pan
    Quit talking about me.






    MZ, the reason we have the expression "Women drivers!! <shaking fist>"

  5. #5
    Member Wulf9's avatar
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    I know a lot of people who don't drive who live in dense urban areas which have good transportation. Time is not an issue because they have jobs and good services near their houses.

    Many of these people are also active professionals who travel frequently. When they travel, they take a cab or, in some cases, rent a car.

    Another characteristic I have noted is that they often "mooch a ride" with friends who are drivers - and they get pretty good at finding folks who will take them to their desired destinations.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Wow... now that would be a great study. If someone from the transportation, planning, health, and psychology sectors all got together for it.

    I donít know of any studies that have been done, but you might want to look and psychological health rates in areas that do and do not drive. Some European areas would be a great case example.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  7. #7
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Michele Zone
    Quit talking about me.

    MZ, the reason we have the expression "Women drivers!! <shaking fist>"
    Actually I directed that comment to circus. He seems to start too many interesting threads. OK so I'm a trouble maker.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
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    Ghengis Khan was pretty aggressive; I don't this he drove an SUV

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    Actually I directed that comment to circus. He seems to start too many interesting threads. OK so I'm a trouble maker.
    I was joking back, silly. It isn't like you would have any way of knowing how I drive.



    Sigh.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian circusoflife's avatar
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    apples and oranges

    Quote Originally posted by gkmo62u
    Ghengis Khan was pretty aggressive; I don't this he drove an SUV
    Good point. All things being equal...which of course they seldom are - just wondering if someone had ever tried to isolate out the effect in a semi-controlled study.

    I guess some hints would be to look at the effect of traffic jams on people's psyches - a la road rage....

    Michele - you make a good point with time.

    I guess since women can't drive in some countries - like Saudi Arabia, that might be a good study, but then you have the distorting effect of a different religion, different level of women's rights, and environment - major desert.

    The hope would be that someone identified two places akin to the taste of a red apple vs a green apple, as opposed to an apple vs orange.
    - Beware more of the man in the fancy cloak, than the one in tattered clothing -

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