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Thread: No Watering!

  1. #1
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    No Watering!

    The drought has gotten so bad in the boomburbs northwest of Chicago, that the villages of Algonquin and Lake in the Hills have banned ALL outside water usage UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. And many other towns without water restrictions like Crystal Lake, Huntley, McHenry, and Marengo now have even/odd water restrictions where even-numbered addresses water on even-numbered days and odd-numbered addresses water on odd-numbered days. The grass is brown and yellow all over now. And plants are dying. It desn't show any signs of letting up soon, as it is 90 degrees everyday with only 30% chance of isolated storms. We illegally fill our watering can though so we can water the tomato plant and the bird bath. Hope we don't get that $100 ticket.

    Has it ever gotten this bad by you??
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    yes when I was a planner in NC it got very bad a few years ago. For some reason folks only think of water shortages out west but they happen all across the nation. parts of Va right now are starting under water restrictions as well.
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  3. #3
         
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    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner
    The drought has gotten so bad in the boomburbs northwest of Chicago, that the villages of Algonquin and Lake in the Hills have banned ALL outside water usage UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. And many other towns without water restrictions like Crystal Lake, Huntley, McHenry, and Marengo now have even/odd water restrictions where even-numbered addresses water on even-numbered days and odd-numbered addresses water on odd-numbered days. The grass is brown and yellow all over now. And plants are dying. It desn't show any signs of letting up soon, as it is 90 degrees everyday with only 30% chance of isolated storms. We illegally fill our watering can though so we can water the tomato plant and the bird bath. Hope we don't get that $100 ticket.

    Has it ever gotten this bad by you??
    Not that bad, there is one area under a water boil because levels got too low. We have been adviced to conserve water and raise our thermostats a degree or two. But nothing like that or a 100$ fine for watering...
    I cut my grass last night right after work, I thought I was going to die it was so friggin hot...today is only getting worse @ 99 degrees...I keep thinking thats horribly hot but know that it gets much hotter in other parts of the country, why is it such a big deal around here??

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    We've had the even/odd watering system for years and there's a big promotion now to get people to water no more than twice a week. I've nevered watered my lawn, and it stays green.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Most of Montana and especially the Helena Valley has been in a drought for six years. This spring and summer has been wet. It has rained several times a week. My lawn, which I mowed twice last year, need weekly mowing. All that rain killed my newly planted asparagus. No one is using their sprinklers.

    Of course after six years of deficit, we are still behind. The reservoirs are not where they should be. The forests are fine now, but a few weeks of very hot weather and high winds could significantly increase the fire danger. Mother Nature has been drinking up the water like a sponge.

    For once, we are doing just fine here.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  6. #6
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Cleveland got hit hard with torrential rains last night. Otherwise, I've been watering the front yard every night, just before sunset, for a half hour. No bans, no shortages, We're in the Great Lakes watershed, and watering restrictions are uncommon.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  7. #7
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    A truely unique pattern has setup from SE Missouri through Northern LP Michigan. The lack of rain in this area is very similar to the devastating drought of 1988. In that year, Chicago recorded 52 90+ degree days and less than 3 inches of precipitation from May through August. In adjusted terms, it was the costliest natural disaster ever recorded in the USA with total economic/agricultural losses in the $60 billion dollar range. The difference between 1988 and 2005 thus far is that the drought in 1988 was widespread from the plains to the east coast. This drought is affecting the corrdor mentioned above.

    The big deal about 99 high temps in St. Louis or Chicago is the humidity. When it's 115 in Phoenix and hot.. it's hot and feels about 110-115. When it's 99 and humid in St. Louis it can feel 110-120..and in the midwest, this just doesn't happen frequently enough for the population to adjust to the heat stresses. Many older homes are still not A/C'd as well.

    In Peoria, we've already recorded 13 90+ days, today will be 14 (normal year has 20). We've had 1.4 inches of rain since May 1st. In a normal year we would have had nearly 8 inches. Surprisingly, the local (privately owned) water company has not placed watering restrictions on us yet. They're drawing over half of their water from the river now (which makes it taste awful). Normally, it's nearly all from the aquifers. My lawn is brown except for the weeds, which seem to be doing fine.

    All of the towns that allow open burning have banned it for until the drought lets.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    We don’t have much of a problem here in the Kalamazoo area with rain fall. So far in the month of June we have had 4.67 inches according to the National Weather Service (but it said that there was no rain on days I know it rained). About have of that was from one storm too!

    I know that if it is available, when I get my own house I will have a well and a pump for any outdoor stuff so I won’t have to pay the water charge, and then use city water for the indoor stuff.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  9. #9
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    It has been like this in Colorado for a couple years now. The region I moved to has a TON of lakes and ponds and water, so no restrictions. But Denver and the surburbs have been restricted for a while.
    It has been a wet year though, which is good for growing stuff (like mosquitos )
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  10. #10
    Cyburbian
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    Oh... Too bad you guys have water shortages and drought... We were swimming around here for the last 2 days with like 20 inches of rain (that's a lot for Santiago) but well, it's winter here, and it's supposed to rain in winter...

  11. #11

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    High & Dry

    As Z-M notes, Denver had some restrictions of the last few years of our drought but they've eased up given the improved snowpack runoff this year. And the return to our cycles of afternoon thunderstorms have helped, too.

    The restrictions were wildly successful in curbing consumption and as a result, Denver's water authority is considering raising rates for big users.

    I say bravo - we're a semi-arid plain - but you wouldn't know it from watching the watering behaviors here. I've got a neighbor who likely has enough groundwater accumulated underneath the front yard from excessive watering to fill Lake Mead.

    Like gasoline, when it becomes scarce, the forces of the market will change behavior.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Plenty of Water....

    We had a day last week when it rained 4 inches in a few hours.....very nice.....keeps everything clean looking......
    Skilled Adoxographer

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Plus Whose Yur Planner's avatar
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    I think part of Indy are doing it, but here in the northeast part, we are not. The rainfall have been strange and very hit and miss. We're getting plenty of rain, but other parts of the metro area are not.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  14. #14

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    California had a quite wet winter-including the torrential far-above-normal rainfall in Southern California, which broke a multi-year drought down there (hence homes sliding into the sea and the like).

    Of course, being a wet-dry climate, even a wet winter eventually ends (although we had significant rainfall twice in JUNE, something I don't remember in the 15 years I've lived here.)

    The big problem now: wet winter=tall grass and underbrush=big fires. You should see the dried grass-its amazingly tall. This morning, there was a brush fire in Contra Costa County on both sides of Interstate 680. Eeek. Hehhehhehheh-fire! fire!

    Mom wants me to visit. Not sure I want to spend the money, and I definitely don't want to be in Indiana right now.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by SkeLeton
    Oh... Too bad you guys have water shortages and drought... We were swimming around here for the last 2 days with like 20 inches of rain (that's a lot for Santiago) but well, it's winter here, and it's supposed to rain in winter...
    20 inches in two days? I think that is a lot for any area on Earth! How bad was the flooding? How is your storm water management system?
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  16. #16
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Boiker brings up a good point. Heat waves and droughts, while far less dramatic than tornadoes, blizzards, and hurricanes actually kill more people and inflict greater economic damage than all of those natural disasters combined.

    Invariably it seems nature likes to dish out massive floods to follow extended periods of drought.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  17. #17
    We haven't been given any restrictions here in NE Wisconsin, and I don't remember the last time we had any. I am kind of hoping that my area will adopt a regular even/odd watering schedule or something similar, drought or not, but I don't think it will happen.

    My neighbor waters his grass just about every day this time of the year - all day, too - not just in the evening or morning. We just water our garden and perennials (when it gets really hot) - with a watering can instead of the hose.

    I have a hard time adjusting to hot, humid weather. Thank goodness my house and car have air-conditioning!

  18. #18
    Cyburbian
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    Most communities in the Midwest have the even-odd system I believe, but I guess you don't need to use it if it rains every other day. I've cut my lawn more this year than I ever had, rain/heat/rain/heat, bad mix.

  19. #19
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    Hrmm. I didn't know there was a drought, although I suppose it has been a long time since it's rained. We get our water from the lake in the city.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian MD Planner's avatar
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    It's been pretty dry here in MD but we have had a few t-storms that have helped the crops a bit. In 2002 the city where I work now actually was trucking water in to the tune of over $10,000 a day! If people had to pay what water was truly worth NOBODY would water their lawns.

    BTW, don't forget a good source of water for your plants is your dehumidifier. I was stopped by the police twice a few years ago when spotted watering our hanging baskets on our porch during a restriction period until I explained the water was not out of the tap.
    He's a planner, he's a dreamer, he's a sordid little schemer,
    Seems to think that money grows on trees . . .

  21. #21
          jhboyle's avatar
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    We recieved a water Quality report for the City that i work in, on the back cover they had an ad touting how much water we had, and that you should water your lawns, I am going to scan it in and post it if i can get my scanner to work

  22. #22
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    Vancouver's had water restrictions during the summer months for years, although at first more for image than necessity.

    Water sprinkling regulations
    Effective from June 1 to September 30
    Sprinkling allowed between 4-9 am or 7-10 pm
    Even-numbered addresses: Wednesday & Saturday
    Odd-numbered addresses: Thursday & Sunday
    ...
    Sprinkling restrictions do not affect vegetable and flower garden watering. You may water your garden as often as needed, but use a watering can or a hose with a spring-loaded, shut-off nozzle to reduce water waste.
    This really isn't onerous. No one needs to be sprinkling more than two days a week, anyways. Further, the restriction to morning/evening use is wise in order to avoid instant evaporation of water that was meant for the roots of lawns and plants.

    http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/water/
    http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/water/sprinkling-regulations.htm
    http://www.gvrd.bc.ca/water/pdfs/wat...age-detail.pdf [PDF]

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    here is the text of the water conservation actions in the City I used to plan for.

    http://www.greensboro-nc.gov/water/E...29.5Ooct02.pdf

    You know its serious when you are counting the days of water left in your lakes and trying to figure out how to keep a system that was never meant to go dry from doing just that. What do you do with a city over 200,000 with only 80 days of water left. Very scary time to be a planner let me tell you.

    We had no car washing, no water of plants unless it was well or gray water, no water served in restaurants without it being requested. Folks moved to use paper products to cut down on washing etc. No pools or fountains could fill or operate outdoors without their own private supply of water. Trucking in water for someone's pool was costly but did happen.

    There is also a great write up on it at
    http://www.anla.org/waterwise/CaseStudies.htm
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  24. #24
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Good news...the ban is lifted. However, we are back to the even/odd thing, and only between 6-8 a.m. and 7-9 p.m.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  25. #25
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner
    Good news...the ban is lifted. However, we are back to the even/odd thing, and only between 6-8 a.m. and 7-9 p.m.
    I always think of it this way: 'Don't water the lawn' means that you don't have to mow it, either.

    Mike

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