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Thread: Living large, by design, in the middle of nowhere

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Living large, by design, in the middle of nowhere

    Headline and Article from the NY Times:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/08/15/na...rtner=homepage

    Highlights:
    Its square mile of tightly packed homes is the outer crest of Tampa's residential swell, four miles from the nearest grocery store and 30 minutes from the nearest major mall.

    Over the next decade, New River will expand to 1,800 acres and be home to 15,000 people living in 4,800 single-family homes, condominiums, town houses and rental units. It will have a 200-acre town center with 180,000 square feet of office space, 500,000 square feet of commercial space, schools, government offices and a 207-acre park.

    At the moment, though, it is nothing more than an island of 400 suburban homes in the middle of nowhere, an infant exurb.

    The term "exurb" was coined in the 1950's in "The Exurbanites" by A. C. Spectorsky, a social historian, to describe semirural areas far outside cities where wealthy people had country estates. The exurbs of the 21st century are a different animal. And they are not the same as the older rings of closer suburbs.

  2. #2
         
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    New River, along with at least 12 other Developments of Regional Impact (DRIs') are scheduled to be built out within the next 15 to twenty years. We, (Department of Community Affairs) have seen a trend by Regional Planning Councils preferring/encouraging these types of developments as long as environmental and public facility impacts are minimal. The connection that has yet to be made however is the ostensible economic surplus created by the development program and the reality of phased development which usually ensures all or most of the residential districts are completed initially.

    Of course, this makes sense from a developers standpoint, but the community doesn't have an accurate account of the fiscal impacts associated with the current phasing technique. By the time non-residential uses are integrated and near completion, citizens of the PUD will be complaining about traffic congestion, quality of life, and rising property taxes. The new legislation however (Chp. 2005-290, Laws of Florida) attempts to minimize the time frame between impacts and mitigation as well as force local governments to demonstrate true sources of financial feasibility for the projects. I hope the Development Order approved for Beat Khali and New River Partners will begin a trend of authentic mixed use developments for Pasco County. One more thing, Pasco has no water!!!!!!!!!

  3. #3
    Cyburbian tsc's avatar
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    After watching a commercial about housing developments in Florida (pumped by Erik Estrada), a co-worker of mine went for the "free" trip to check it out. He had no intention to buy...but to just get info revealing these housing developments for what they are. His power point show was hilarious... as this is coming from a NY city guy...who believes in bikes and public transportation...

    I wish I could post his presentation for all to see.
    "Yeehaw!" is not a foreign policy

    Renovating the '62 Metzendorf
    http://metzendorf.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Ishmael
    One more thing, Pasco has no water!!!!!!!!!
    I used to work for SWFWMD and at that time, Pinellas had a bunch of wells in Pasco and was selling water back to Pasco; is that still the case?

  5. #5
         
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess
    I used to work for SWFWMD and at that time, Pinellas had a bunch of wells in Pasco and was selling water back to Pasco; is that still the case?
    I'm aware of a few cities on the west coast of Pasco County that purchase rights from Tampa Bay Water to use the Northern Pasco and Starkey Wellfields at a rate betwen $3-5 a gallon with at an average maximum flow allowance of 1.5mgd based on current level of service.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    "Developers have done surveys to determine what potential owners want." (Caption from the photo of the minivan driving down the street).

    So I guess those surveys indicated that people did not want street trees, porches, or visual interest when walking in their neighborhood? Check out the dead wall effect of those front loading garages. What a joke.

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