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Thread: Upper middle class suburbia 1960s style - Amherst, New York {56k a bit slow)

  1. #1
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Upper middle class suburbia 1960s style - Amherst, New York {56k a bit slow)

    Admit it ... you want to see some images of Amherst. Here's a few shots taken from around the North Forest/Maple Road area. The peak period of development in this area was between 1965 and 1980, although some infill development continues to this day.

    Many of the following homes are of an architectural style that I call "Northtowns Neo-Roman"; such houses are very common in suburban Buffalo, and variants can be found in suburban Toronto and Montreal. drucee calls the style "Midwest Soft Italianate Colonial", and I've heard a real estate agent call it "Capozzi style". You can see a old discussion about the Northtowns Neo-Roman style here.























    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  2. #2
    Cyburbian drucee's avatar
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    Kind of like the near south or northwest Chicago suburbs (Oak Lawn, Palos Hills, Des Plaines, Palatine, Mt. Prospect, Arlington Heights) but a little more colonial detailing, a few goofy lawn ornaments (it is western New York, after all), and even a few specimens (the red brick houses in the second through fourth photos from the bottom) that look like either re-imaginations of the Prairie House (see my River Forest thread) or like today's European suburban house (often found in the UK and Belgium).

    What's the transit situation in Amherst? Is it possible to live car-free there?

  3. #3
    Cyburbian jsk1983's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by drucee
    What's the transit situation in Amherst? Is it possible to live car-free there?
    There is bus service to and from Amherst along Main St., along Niagara Falls blvd. (eastern border) and along the Millersport Hwy. leading to Lockport. All busses originate and terminate out of the south campus (UB) metrorail station.

    The older sections of Amherst are walkable (Eggertsville, Snyder, and Williamsville) but the retail selection seems to be comprised of mainly salons and giftshops geared toward the upper middle class women and not "nieghborhood" retail.

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    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    God...that is some of the worst upper-middle income housing I have seen in a awhile. That barely visible italianate style is terrible.

    It's as bad as the hyper-inflated "farmhouse" style slapped on the front of the new Pulte and Kimball Homes houses here in northwest Chicagoland.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  5. #5
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    God...that is some of the worst upper-middle income housing I have seen in a awhile. That barely visible italianate style is terrible.
    Fortunately, not much is being built in that style today. There are still a few homes, mostly in very high-end subdivisions, reflecting a Northtowns Neo-Roman heritage, but most of what you see in Amherst today is either a Colonial variant, "soft contemporary," or multi-gabled messes.

    Want your own suburban Buffalo-style Neo-Roman house?. There's no shortage of them on the market. Most are in Amherst, though.

    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh


    http://www.buffaloniagarahomes.com/p...rch=NO&src=bnh
    (Click on the interior photos of this one, goombah!)

    There's even ranch versions of the Neo-Roman style, but they're less common.

    Ugly, I know. So are late 1800s-early 1900s era vernacular telescoping hosues, too, but preservationists consider them important and worthy of conservation. Will they be working to save Amherst's unique Neo-Roamn houses 50 years from now?

    Here's more around area. Nothing terrible exciting. The images are about 10 years old.

    Soft contemporary, ~early 1990s


    Colonial variant, ~early 1990s


    Streetscape of Neo-Tudor, Colonial and soft contemporary variants, ~late 1980s


    Colonial variants, ~early 1970s


    Colonial variant, ~mid-1970s


    Colonial and Neo-Roman variants, ~mid-1960s


    Split level, ~mid-1960s


    Neo-Tudor-inspired split level, ~mid-1970s. Reminds me of the split-level houses that are common in the Kansas City suburbs.


    Split level, ~late 1960s
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  6. #6

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    There's quite a bit more brick, but it looks quite a lot like parts of Fort Wayne.

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