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Thread: Required recycling of demolished buildings

  1. #1
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    Required recycling of demolished buildings

    The great powers that be in my community are reccomending that all buildings that are demolished in town be recycled. Has anyone heard of anything similar anywhere?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    The new search engine can be finicky, so you might not have been able to find this recent discussion about "deconstruction" and recycling.

    Although it's not quite building recycling, there were a few infill projects in Denver that involve recycling concrete, asphalt and some buildings from the former use on the site; Lowry, Stapleton, and Highlands Garden Village. I'm sure some Cyburbians that live in Colorado will come along with more about more recent projects.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  3. #3
         
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    I don't know that this is exactly the same as "recycling" a structure but if we have a historic building removed (rare case) we ask that all salvagable materials be removed prior to demolition. We reuse a lot of the old windows, doors, moldings etc in other strucutres around town. Now as far as reusing old concrete, etc; no we don't do that here.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Under our culture of neglect, we allow the 'urban miners' to strip buildings down of anythig usefull. You would be surprised at what people steal. How about aluminum siding, bricks (yes they take the bricks off the houses), windows, doors, toilets (why run over to Ontario to get a full flusher when you can just take one out of an abandoned house?), pipes, wires, wall tile.

    By the time a property actually gets demolished, its been through a lot already.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian thinknik's avatar
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    Our town is proposing an amendment modeled after Jacksonville's. It also goes a bit further in that the reviewing authority may choose to require an applicant, at the applicant's expense, to record a structure, for archival purposes, prior to its demolition.

    You can find a copy of the proposed amendments -- there are quite a few, including granting the reviewing authority the option to deny demolitions in limited cases -- here: http://cpsa-staug.org/

  6. #6
    Cyburbian DCBuff's avatar
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    I know Boulder,CO has a building material reuse center, which houses reusable construstion materials from demoed buildings. I also think they may have some requirements on this issue, but I am not sure.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    It's pretty common that the bricks, etc. here get packaged up and sold off when a building comes down. From what I hear a lot of it ends up in places like the West Coast and the South. It's kinda funny if you think about it. The historical part of the country is getting torn down and that history shipped to the part of the country that has none.

    I wonder how long until, say, Cleveland gets torn down and shipped to China so they can have their very own 19th century city...

  8. #8
         
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    Our county has a voluntary separation program to recycle building materials such as concrete, wood, bricks... These materials are then collected by Taylor Recycling, http://www.taylor-recycling.com/iowa.htm in Des Moines. In addition, the state has three different non-profit facilities www.homerecycling.org that accept donations of usable building materials and provide those materials for free to income qualified households. Items not in demand by low income households are sold to the general public to finance operations.

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