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Thread: Very old Pittsburgh pics (broadband required)

  1. #1
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    Very old Pittsburgh pics (broadband required)

    I got most of these from the Historic Pittsburgh photo collection, which can be found here.

    Historic Pittsburgh


    The Terrace Village Housing Project rises above the Soho section of the Hill District. 1941.




    Ugh! Not sure where this is.




    Basketball legend Connie Hawkins works with some kids in my neighborhood. Circa 1972.




    Gazzam's Hill was a lightly developed section of the Hill District until 1940.




    Don't know where this is, but I'm glad I didn't have to live there.





    Fire on The Hill.





    North Side rowhouses.





    Not a pretty scene.




    A grimy courtyard between two rows. I can't imagine how many lived here.




    Pretty dense, huh!




    Nice iron work.




    Near Duquesne University.




    Hill District Housing.






    Flat rooftops in Soho. Most of this is still there. The Brady Street Bridge, in the background was razed in 1978. A worker lost his legs in the process. It was replaced by the Birmingham Bridge.




    Houses in East Allegheny, on the North Side. Notice the lack of siding on the houses. Houses like this are now covered with white siding.




    Trees obscure this view now.




    These houses in Oakland were razed. Victims of Pitt's never ending expansion.




    The lower Hill, prior to urban renwal.




    This section of the East Liberty commercial district, was destroyed in a crackpot effort to save it.




    Razed for the Porter Building.




    The Hill District.





    Allentown. The trolley still runs here.




    Warrington Avenue prior to paving.




    Beltzhoover Elementary School, my alma mater.



    East Park School.




    I grew up 2 blocks from here.




    More old schools.




    The Strip District was a teeming slum at the turn of the century. 18,000 people lived in a district 20 blocks long, and three blocks wide. Dense enough for you?




    Egad!




    These were actually occupied.




    Lincoln School, East Liberty.




    The North Side. Pittsburgh still has many streets like this.




    Manchester, prior to being rent by a highway.




    McCandless School, Lawrenceville.




    Montooth School, Beltzhoover. This was a club for many years, and was recently razed.




    Westlake School, Elliot. My dad was a student here when it closed.




    Riverside High, Esplen.



    Long gone Knoxville Elementary.




    Manchester.




    Warrington Ave., Beltzhoover.



    Woods Run School, North Side.




    Manchester.




    Note the "mammy" doll in the girls hand.




    Humbodlt School, South Side.




    Brilliant School. No one even lives around here now.



    Glenwood School.




    Old Central High School.




    Tall and Italianate Hancock School on The Hill.




    These bit the dust when J&L mill expanded after WW2.



    Early 19th Century housing Downtown near the Point.




    Franklin School, Hill District.




    Bennet School in Homewood.




    Snodgrass School.




    Allegheny High School.



    East Park Elementary, North Side.



    Fineview School, North Side.




    This school still stands on West Carson St.



    Not sure where these are.





    Concord School, Carrick.



    North Side.




    East Ohio Street.




    Brushton School, Homewood.




    Bayard School, Lawrenceville. This still stands.



    Banksville school. This area remained rural until WW2.




    Becks Run School. This is a bar now.




    Fifth Avenue, Uptown. Before urban renewal.




    Federal Street, North Side. PNC Park now sits to the left here.




    Before and after. North Side.





    Federal Street, looking toward the Sixth Street Bridge, and Downtown. PNC Park now sits to the right.




    The Allegheny Market House. Built 1863, razed 1965. Maybe the worst decision made during the urban renewal period.



    When the North Side was the separate City of Allegheny, this was it's city hall.




    Federal Street looking north. This was all ripped out for a mall that failed.




    On old hotel on Sandusky Street, North Side.



    Sandusky Street being paved. My Great Grandmother grew up on these blocks.



    Penn Avenue, Downtown. Some of this still stands.




    The Penn Incline, looking towards the Strip.



    The Pennsylvania Railroad station, before and after the railroad riots of 1877. The railroad punished the city by not building a replacement for 24 years.




    Grim scenes, who knows where.




    The corner of North and Federal, North Side. This is pretty much intact, but in dreadful shape.




    This the same corner. Note how badly the corner building has been butchered. Only the placement of the windows betrays the fact that they are indeed the same building.


    North Side under water. Prior to flood control, this happened all too often.



    Fairhaven School, Overbrook.



    Allegheny Center. This was flattened for the ill fated mall.




    Hard to convince me that this impressive gem wasn't worth saving.

  2. #2
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Moderator note:
    With bandwidth-intensive photo posts, please post a warning in the title line. Thanks.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  3. #3
    Awesome photos! Sure wish they could do something like this for Toledo.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Interesting. My mom's family is from Pittsburgh and she grew up in the area, but I've never been there.

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    seeing those pics really does help one better understand the reasoning behind the renevwal efforts of the planners of the day. Those really were slums, but unfortunately they thought a "clean slate" approach coupled with Corbu urbanism was the solution. Because it was the density that created the slum not the absentee landlords, lack of secondary education, 15 years of economic depression, nascent expensive household technology, etc.

    the picture you showed of small scale rehab was really (with the advantage of 20/20 hindsight vision) the way that the urban renewal should have occurred.....but we all know that........

    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    seeing those pics really does help one better understand the reasoning behind the renevwal efforts of the planners of the day. Those really were slums, but unfortunately they thought a "clean slate" approach coupled with Corbu urbanism was the solution. Because it was the density that created the slum not the absentee landlords, lack of secondary education, 15 years of economic depression, nascent expensive household technology, etc.

    the picture you showed of small scale rehab was really (with the advantage of 20/20 hindsight vision) the way that the urban renewal should have occurred.....but we all know that........

    Actually, the worst of those pics were taken 100 years ago, well before the great depression. Things had improved quite a bit by the dawn of the urban renewal era (1950), but the old areas were seen as dispensable as much for being old fashioned as for being rundown. Things are most at risk when they are old enough to be seen as out of date, but not old enough to be viewed as classic. If you owned a 57 Chevy in 1965, you would have been embarrassed to be seen driving such a dowdy, cablike car. By 1980, you would be kicking yourself for not holding onto a "classic". Our buildings and neighborhoods are the same way. The Victorian neighborhoods that were so chic in 1880, seemed tired and garish by 1930. Plus, the fact that they were so ubiquitous made the idea of bulldozing a few seem like no big deal. Today, we lament their loss.

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    What Great Shots!

    Enjoyed these immensely; a place and time now lost to us.

    Except, of course, the GOP billboard promoting security; I saw some in my neighborhood during the last election touting the GOP's prowess in keeping us "safe from terrorism."

    After all of these years, fear remains an effective motivator.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Doohickie's avatar
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    My ancestors settled in Pittsburgh prior to moving to Buffalo

    I have records that say my grandfather was born at 4731 Plum Alley, which I think is now 4731 Plum Way I think. Are any of these pictures from that area of town?

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Luca's avatar
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    Lovely schoolhouses....

    Those school buildings look very solid and high-quality. It's be great to see some before and after shots with the drck that I would guess has repalkced them.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian boilerplater's avatar
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    The 2 pictures of the corner of North & Federal are the same. Did you mean to put in a contemporary one? Don't mean to nitpick. I really enjoyed this posting and I'm curious about what it looks like today.
    Adrift in a sea of beige

  11. #11
    Member Nor Cal Planner Girl's avatar
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    Great photos!- Fabulous architeture... dark, glum, depressing black & white photos that depict the gritty environment that people in...reminds me of Tim Burton.

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    I second Norcal Planner Girls' remarks....there is a certain noir feeling here.

    But what I find really fascinating is the architecture....some of these rowhouse, the style of the rowhouses, are nearly indentical to pix Ive seen of rowhouses in Louisville, in areas that where urban renewed away during the '40s, '50s, &'60s...and earlier.

    And a bit similar to what can be found in Cincy in Over the Rhine.

    I'm wondering if a case can be made for a "Ohio Valley Tenement" typology...a vernacular architectural style shared between the larger Ohio Valley cities.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the post about Historic Pittsburgh!

    I am glad you enjoy the Historic Pittsburgh site. I am one of the curators responsible for selecting, describing, and helping to make this site what it is.

    We add new photographs nearly every month. Our next upload for November will include 19th Century images and additional general photographs of the Pittsburgh environs.

    If any of you have suggestions, questions or comments, please let me know.


    Miriam Meislik
    (aka cameragnome)
    cameragnome@gmail.com

    Archivist/Photograph Curator
    University of Pittsburgh

    and

    Lecturer, School of Information Science, University of Pittsburgh

  14. #14
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    Hmm... now I can't see them.

  15. #15
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    Plum Way

    Dohickie,

    One image currently exists in the online collection for Plum Way, which tends to be another way of saying Plum Alley. The street is in the Lawrenceville neighborhood of Pittsburgh. This neighborhood, a long time working class neighborhood which was once the home of composer Stephen Foster, is currently undergoing a fantastic renaissance. The street is between 47th and 49th and, according to the 1923 Plat Map, ended at the Crucible Steel Works.


    I tried to post the links, but the system won't let me. I will try to PM them to you.

    Miriam




    Quote Originally posted by Doohickie
    I have records that say my grandfather was born at 4731 Plum Alley, which I think is now ......Are any of these pictures from that area of town?

  16. #16
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    old pic of terrace village in pittsburgh pa

    please do anyone have pic of elmore square in the 70s or 80s are maybe before then

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