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Thread: Neotraditional streets vs. segragated streets in terms of traffic safety

  1. #26
    Quote Originally posted by Transport Queen
    In places with a lot of snow, where there is onstreet parking, I think the streets are signed for no parking in the evenings or some period during the day when plows can get there.
    Yeah, we have those too, our ordinance reads "Snow Emergency Street= when there is a forecast of 2+ inches of snow, then you cannot park on said street" but they are only posted on mains (state routes) and are rarely enforced by our PD. We cannot restrict parking in our residential areas, otherwise they have no place to park and everyone would get towed. Some of the streets don't have driveways (narrow 33' lots) and no parking off alley, not that they could get in the alley if it were snowing, because they are unimproved and not plowed either.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  2. #27
         
    Registered
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    Sydney, New South Wales
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    Quote Originally posted by ssnyderjr
    Yeah, we have those too, our ordinance reads "Snow Emergency Street= when there is a forecast of 2+ inches of snow, then you cannot park on said street" but they are only posted on mains (state routes) and are rarely enforced by our PD. We cannot restrict parking in our residential areas, otherwise they have no place to park and everyone would get towed. Some of the streets don't have driveways (narrow 33' lots) and no parking off alley, not that they could get in the alley if it were snowing, because they are unimproved and not plowed either.
    It might be a little confusing, but I think in winter, even days you park on one side and odd days you can park on the other, that way it gets plowed fairly regularly.

  3. #28
    Quote Originally posted by Transport Queen
    It might be a little confusing, but I think in winter, even days you park on one side and odd days you can park on the other, that way it gets plowed fairly regularly.
    Sounds good in theory........unless you get parked (snowed) in or just plain don't have enough room on the road to allow for parking on both sides.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  4. #29
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Hmmm??

    How bad can the traffic be in Iceland, when only about 490 of every 1,000 residents has a vehicle?? That's about 145,600 vehicles with a workforce at about 158,100 in an area the size of Kentucky......I guess minus the glaciers (11%)..an area the size of Maine. But when I think about it, Maine probably has twice as many miles of paved roads as Iceland, maybe three times as many?? Anyone know....








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  5. #30
         
    Registered
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    Reykjavik, Iceland
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    Quote Originally posted by The One
    How bad can the traffic be in Iceland, when only about 490 of every 1,000 residents has a vehicle?? That's about 145,600 vehicles with a workforce at about 158,100 in an area the size of Kentucky......I guess minus the glaciers (11%)..an area the size of Maine. But when I think about it, Maine probably has twice as many miles of paved roads as Iceland, maybe three times as many?? Anyone know....
    Heh, no wonder you ask since you apparently know a thing or two about our little barren rock here in the North-Atlantc

    Well, its not really a question about traffic and traffic volumes are not the primary initiative for our research. Our aim is traffic safety and urban quality, and to see whether those two things cannot be better integrated into new development areas. But there is a tiny obstacle here, called technocrats. They tend to block more blending and mixing of traffic in new developments planned as pedestrian friendly, high density and mix use. Primarily out of fear of poorer traffic safety as a result. We want to test the theory that traffic safety isn't worse in Reykjaviks older pre-war neighbourhoods than in new developments since a lot of small scale remedies (calming etc.) have vastly improved the statistics over the years. We also want to gather international information in our research.

    The figures on car-ownership that you have gathered seem to be outdated. In our 200.000 inh. Capital Area the figures are >600 cars/ 1000 inh. Because of recent ecomonic strenght (+$30.000 per capita) traffic has soared and we've got jams in our rather small city during peak hours. So traffic can cause headaches in even the most barren countries

    "The size of Kentucky" hehe, I've heard that size comparison all to often

    And you're probably right about Maine having twice or three times as many miles of paved roads as Iceland. Even route no.1 in Iceland, the circumferental island road isn't completely paved yet, to the frustration of many ... instead we spend on tunnels to nowhere. Its all politics, you know it.

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