Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Economic development in historically black neighborhoods

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    80

    Economic development in historically black neighborhoods

    I'm a part of a student team creating an economic development plan for a historically black neighborhood that has fallen into serious decline since desegregation. It's the Ville neighborhood in St. Louis. We'd like to include/leverage the historical significance of the neighborhood into any economic development plans we make.

    What I'm looking for are some precedents where this worked/is being attempted. I've come across two examples so far: the Jazz District in KC, MO and Bronzeville in Chicago, IL.

    Can anyone offer any other examples/advice?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian iamme's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    484
    Quote Originally posted by jdstl1977
    I'm a part of a student team creating an economic development plan for a historically black neighborhood that has fallen into serious decline since desegregation. It's the Ville neighborhood in St. Louis. We'd like to include/leverage the historical significance of the neighborhood into any economic development plans we make.

    What I'm looking for are some precedents where this worked/is being attempted. I've come across two examples so far: the Jazz District in KC, MO and Bronzeville in Chicago, IL.

    Can anyone offer any other examples/advice?

    Thank you.
    There is also a 'Bronzeville' district in Milwaukee that has been moving forward. Part of the area is using a TIF to finance some of the improvements.

  3. #3
    Member
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Baton Rouge
    Posts
    23

    Black Neighborhoods

    Quote Originally posted by jdstl1977
    What I'm looking for are some precedents where this worked/is being attempted. I've come across two examples so far: the Jazz District in KC, MO and Bronzeville in Chicago, IL.

    Can anyone offer any other examples/advice?
    Thank you.

    Examples: The entire city of New Orleans (Louis Armstrong Park, Vieux Carre, French Market, etc).

    My thoughts: Its good to look back on accomplishments as art, but its vital to support creativity if possible.Usually new styles of american expression (techno, blues, rap, grafitti, hip hop, etc) aren't valued to a large extent domestically until they are accepted by Europe.

    St. Louis has some local rap, (Chingy, Nelly), I would check to see if they have connections to the neighborhood and if they do they could prove vital to promoting the area as a contemporary spot for local culture.
    Since I am black, I will put it blunt. Black people will not support a retrospective. American Black culture is wildly creative and focuses more on advancing culture as opposed to deifying great artistic accomplishments.
    Whatever you do, ask the the old AND young people what they like in terms of music, art, sports, recreation, etc. Also ask them about more than planning. Ak them what they would like to do for a living, if they say they like hiphop ask them who their favorite artist is and why, etc.
    If you want tourists, have jazz and blues stuff. If you want support from the community ask the average person on the street, literally, because I promise no one will show for a meeting. Keep it simple, low key, and get to know the clergy, and figures in the community.

    Good Luck.

    Ciao,
    muer

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Above urban19's plane field
    Posts
    2,406
    You might want to check out the Butler Street/Auburn Avenue Redevlopment Plan (downtown Atlanta) here: http://www.atlantaga.gov/government/...therplans.aspx.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Clayobyrne, CB
    Posts
    2,581
    Check out the City of Wilmington, NC Northside Community Plan. A lot of it has come to fruition.

    http://www.wilmingtonnc.gov/longrang...6/Default.aspx

    Too see one that has fallen by the wayside, look here:

    http://www.cityofboston.gov/bra/pdf/...ter%20Plan.pdf

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    80
    We're set to have a charrette this Saturday. History of the Ville was going to be a good part of the beginning of the session. Is there something else we should focus on? I really appreciate your insight and advice. None of the students on the team are black or have come from poor neighborhoods so there is quite a bit of grasping at straws as how to best approach this to get the most community input. There is another group getting oral history from the elderly residents at the Homer G. Phillips Senior Living Community.



    Quote Originally posted by muer
    Examples: The entire city of New Orleans (Louis Armstrong Park, Vieux Carre, French Market, etc).

    My thoughts: Its good to look back on accomplishments as art, but its vital to support creativity if possible.Usually new styles of american expression (techno, blues, rap, grafitti, hip hop, etc) aren't valued to a large extent domestically until they are accepted by Europe.

    St. Louis has some local rap, (Chingy, Nelly), I would check to see if they have connections to the neighborhood and if they do they could prove vital to promoting the area as a contemporary spot for local culture.
    Since I am black, I will put it blunt. Black people will not support a retrospective. American Black culture is wildly creative and focuses more on advancing culture as opposed to deifying great artistic accomplishments.
    Whatever you do, ask the the old AND young people what they like in terms of music, art, sports, recreation, etc. Also ask them about more than planning. Ak them what they would like to do for a living, if they say they like hiphop ask them who their favorite artist is and why, etc.
    If you want tourists, have jazz and blues stuff. If you want support from the community ask the average person on the street, literally, because I promise no one will show for a meeting. Keep it simple, low key, and get to know the clergy, and figures in the community.

    Good Luck.

    Ciao,
    muer

  7. #7
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Someplace between yesterday and tomorrow.
    Posts
    13,132
    I am not sure of the names of the neighborhoods, but there are some in Atlanta.

    I would suggest doing the research of significant historical events and buildings related to your desired outcome, and build off of those. Each community has something different to offer so the opportunities that you have are unique to St. Louis.

    Didnít Marti Gras start in St. Louis???
    Invest in the things today, that provide the returns tomorrow.

  8. #8

    Anacostia

    Look into the Anacostia Waterfront Plan here in Washington D.C.. Anacostia is a historic, African American neighborhood that has been in a state of decline for years. Now, with the baseball stadium providing the impetus, this area is in the beginning stages of a massive econ. revitalization initiative headed by Adria(e)n Washington, formerly of Neighborhood Development Corporation.

  9. #9
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    http://stlouis.missouri.org/greaterville/history.htm

    I am not too familiar with this area, however reading the above link I see that there is a TON of history in the area and the area was built by service workers. An interesting thing that I noticed was the greenhouse and nursery aspect of the area, anywhere in St. Louis City could use gardens and especially gardens children in the area could be a part of (tieing in with the Annie Malone House). I think there are organizations in Chicago that have done garden projects, not sure of the success but they can bring a neighborhood together.
    There is a lot of history in that area, I would start with that. Sounds like you are taking all of the right steps with charettes, etc. Good luck, it is so promising seeing anyone take on projects in St. Louis City. BTW, what school are you doing this project for??

  10. #10
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    80
    St. Louis University's School of Public Policy.


    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra
    http://stlouis.missouri.org/greaterville/history.htm

    I am not too familiar with this area, however reading the above link I see that there is a TON of history in the area and the area was built by service workers. An interesting thing that I noticed was the greenhouse and nursery aspect of the area, anywhere in St. Louis City could use gardens and especially gardens children in the area could be a part of (tieing in with the Annie Malone House). I think there are organizations in Chicago that have done garden projects, not sure of the success but they can bring a neighborhood together.
    There is a lot of history in that area, I would start with that. Sounds like you are taking all of the right steps with charettes, etc. Good luck, it is so promising seeing anyone take on projects in St. Louis City. BTW, what school are you doing this project for??

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 3
    Last post: 18 Jun 2013, 12:50 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last post: 22 Feb 2010, 10:47 AM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last post: 27 Nov 2009, 2:19 AM
  4. Replies: 18
    Last post: 14 Feb 2007, 7:44 AM
  5. Economic Development
    Student Commons
    Replies: 3
    Last post: 12 Sep 2005, 8:42 PM