Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Page 4 of 26 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 14 ... LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 627

Thread: Home Improvement

  1. #76
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    New Town
    Posts
    3,968
    Ditto what Ofos said. My brother had this same kind of furnace chimney removed from the middle of his home and converted it to a laundry chute (since it went to the basement where the W/D are). I believe it was a bit tricky removing the bricks, but it is doable. And its very cool.

    The other thing I will point out is that a lot of time, these spaces in older homes get used as a chase to run wires, telephone lines or even a vent for additional bathrooms – things added over time. You would want to make sure there is none of that business is going on before removing.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  2. #77
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan (Detroit ex-pat since 2004)
    Posts
    5,298

    Floor plan software

    Rather than get into removing a chimney, would it make sense to re-think the kitchen and adjacent spaces? For many years, my favorite column in the Sunday paper was by a designer who'd re-draw people's floor plans for them. Her big things were:

    --to-go space (shelf), nowadays with charging stations
    --landing space for groceries
    --mudroom, family entrance
    --visual screen for the bathroom from adjoining rooms (who wants to sit at the kitchen table and see the toilet?)

    You might want some floor plan software, or the low-tech equivalent, graph paper and post-its cut to size. You could revise the wall space to contain the chimney and use the new wall to include a built-in hutch or a pass-through or broom closet. Maybe add on to the kitchen in a different way and increase the space as well as the usability. Kitchen cab places will also do this (along with lots of upselling) but they don't have the common sense acquired through living in a space.

    Rebooting my kitchen was my first big project. Previously the fridge had floated in the space with the two windows, and the stove on the far opposite corner. I moved the cold storage to the solid wall next to the sink, and brought the stove over to the window wall

    It just dawned on me that I would love to share some designs for you, if you want to shoot a few photos and send via FB.

  3. #78
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    meh.
    Posts
    8,800
    Thanks for the suggestions. I'm nervous enough to not do any home renovations without consulting with a professional. It helps to be friends with the architect who sits on our Historic Pres. Commission.

    V, our house is an American foursquare so our renovations options are somewhat limited (also due to our bank account). For the most part the flow of the house works there are just somethings that could stand some improvements. Unfortunately those somethings are big ticket items - kitchen, upstairs bathroom, basement.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  4. #79
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wishing I were in Asia somewhere!
    Posts
    10,964
    Blog entries
    5
    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post
    Ditto what Ofos said. My brother had this same kind of furnace chimney removed from the middle of his home and converted it to a laundry chute (since it went to the basement where the W/D are). I believe it was a bit tricky removing the bricks, but it is doable. And its very cool.

    The other thing I will point out is that a lot of time, these spaces in older homes get used as a chase to run wires, telephone lines or even a vent for additional bathrooms – things added over time. You would want to make sure there is none of that business is going on before removing.
    I will ditto this as well after finding all of the above in my current rehab project at work. In a previous project we used it as a vent since we were unable to make it serviceable again.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  5. #80
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    8,676
    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    Our house was built in 1929. It does not have a fireplace but it does have an old chimney that runs through the middle of the house and was formerly connected to the furnace. We got a new HE furnace a few years ago and it just vents out the side of the house. The chimney is only about 4 sq ft. but those 4 sq ft would be useful in our small kitchen. If we were ever to redo the kitchen part of me wants to demo the chimney and better utilize that space. Does this sound feasible?
    The chimney runs is next to the kitchen? Open it up a bit and turn it into a brick pizza/bread oven! We have an old chimney in our garage that connects to nothing that I've always wanted to do that to. It has an iron door at the bottom of it (maybe where they could shovel in coal or something?) so for now I just use it as a place to hide Christmas and birthday gifts.
    1 3 5
    ├┼┼╕
    2 4 6 R

  6. #81
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Slightly Off-Center
    Posts
    8,289
    Quote Originally posted by WSU MUP Student View post
    The chimney runs is next to the kitchen? Open it up a bit and turn it into a brick pizza/bread oven! We have an old chimney in our garage that connects to nothing that I've always wanted to do that to. It has an iron door at the bottom of it (maybe where they could shovel in coal or something?) so for now I just use it as a place to hide Christmas and birthday gifts.
    Living in the south, no pizza/bread blast furnace ovens in my house! Old chimneys are problematic, most have deteriorated to the point where they have to be re-lined to be safe. I had mine rebuilt from the roof up and then had a fireplace insert installed that uses insulated metal chimney pipe that runs up through the old brick flue. Much safer. FYI, those metal doors were typically ash clean-outs.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  7. #82
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    meh.
    Posts
    8,800

    Thoughts on patio for slightly sloped backyard

    We've been thinking about putting a patio in our backyard. There is about 50' between our back fence/property and the back of our house. We are thinking of a small patio just to improve the functionality and aesthetics of the yard. Our yard is slightly sloped so that the property line is higher than the rear of the house. Based on that info how would you position the patio? We would consult a profession before undertaking any work but I wanted some thoughts/ideas before we do.

    Option 1) Install patio so that raised end abuts house. Concerns: This would require the installation of a ramp or steps to the driveway.

    Option 2) Install patio so that raised end is in yard. Concerns: Runoff into patio. Would potentially require cutting into yard which a) would disturb tree roots b) require minor retaining wall (?)

    Thoughts?
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  8. #83
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wishing I were in Asia somewhere!
    Posts
    10,964
    Blog entries
    5
    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    We've been thinking about putting a patio in our backyard. There is about 50' between our back fence/property and the back of our house. We are thinking of a small patio just to improve the functionality and aesthetics of the yard. Our yard is slightly sloped so that the property line is higher than the rear of the house. Based on that info how would you position the patio? We would consult a profession before undertaking any work but I wanted some thoughts/ideas before we do.

    Option 1) Install patio so that raised end abuts house. Concerns: This would require the installation of a ramp or steps to the driveway.

    Option 2) Install patio so that raised end is in yard. Concerns: Runoff into patio. Would potentially require cutting into yard which a) would disturb tree roots b) require minor retaining wall (?)

    Thoughts?
    If you posted a couple photos it might be easier to come up with some options.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  9. #84
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Emerald Coast
    Posts
    18,061
    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    .......

    Thoughts?
    Build it parallel to grade. Solves all your problems.
    Habitual Offender

  10. #85
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    meh.
    Posts
    8,800
    Quote Originally posted by Richmond Jake View post
    Build it parallel to grade. Solves all your problems.
    That is one solution. Could make for some interesting dinner parties esp. if alcohol is involved!
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  11. #86
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,199
    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    We've been thinking about putting a patio in our backyard. There is about 50' between our back fence/property and the back of our house. We are thinking of a small patio just to improve the functionality and aesthetics of the yard. Our yard is slightly sloped so that the property line is higher than the rear of the house. Based on that info how would you position the patio? We would consult a profession before undertaking any work but I wanted some thoughts/ideas before we do.

    Option 1) Install patio so that raised end abuts house. Concerns: This would require the installation of a ramp or steps to the driveway.

    Option 2) Install patio so that raised end is in yard. Concerns: Runoff into patio. Would potentially require cutting into yard which a) would disturb tree roots b) require minor retaining wall (?)

    Thoughts?
    Not sure how much of a grade change, or if the patio would be directly adjacent your house, but my vote is to slope away from house toward the back yard. Maybe lower the elevation of the entire patio 9 inches so you have one step up into the house thereby possibly eliminating the need for ramp/steps to driveway and then your retaining wall could be a little taller (and with tile underneath) and have it dual purpose to be used for seating.

  12. #87
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Slightly Off-Center
    Posts
    8,289
    Quote Originally posted by Richmond Jake View post
    Build it parallel to grade. Solves all your problems.
    Install hydraulic lifts (think low-riders), raise and lower as needed or as it amuses you.
    “Death comes when memories of the past exceed the vision for the future.”

  13. #88
    Cyburbian Veloise's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Grand Rapids, Michigan (Detroit ex-pat since 2004)
    Posts
    5,298
    Quote Originally posted by SW MI Planner View post
    Not sure how much of a grade change, or if the patio would be directly adjacent your house, but my vote is to slope away from house toward the back yard. Maybe lower the elevation of the entire patio 9 inches so you have one step up into the house thereby possibly eliminating the need for ramp/steps to driveway and then your retaining wall could be a little taller (and with tile underneath) and have it dual purpose to be used for seating.

  14. #89
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,075
    Rather than a single patio, build a series of small spaces at different grades. One for a grill, one for a table, and one with a seating wall or stones. Some could be shaded while others might enjoy the sun. You could landscape with different themes for each space. Perhaps one might feature roses, another might be enclosed with shrubberies, and the other could long-blooming perennials. Maybe one is surfaced with cobbles, another with rustic bricks in a herringbone pattern, and the final one uses an open paver filled with moss. You could use a flowing water feature to tie them together.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  15. #90
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,861
    Cost of new kitchen faucet at Lowes, including tax: $214
    Numbers running through RJ's brain when he takes out the old faucet, realizes the holes in the countertop are too small for the new one, realizes his cordless drill battery pack is dead, and contemplates getting a plumber out on a Saturday: $300
    Look on RJ's face when I say "I have a drill. An electric drill.": Priceless

    Been together 8 years, and the man is shocked that I own an electric drill.

    But I have to say the new faucet is a vast improvement.

  16. #91
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,861
    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    Cost of new kitchen faucet at Lowes, including tax: $214
    Numbers running through RJ's brain when he takes out the old faucet, realizes the holes in the countertop are too small for the new one, realizes his cordless drill battery pack is dead, and contemplates getting a plumber out on a Saturday: $300
    Look on RJ's face when I say "I have a drill. An electric drill.": Priceless

    Been together 8 years, and the man is shocked that I own an electric drill.

    But I have to say the new faucet is a vast improvement.
    It looked good until we had to cram a dozen towels all over the floor to get the leaks. Me, I follow instructions. Rj, not so much: gasket, what gasket? I figure, the manufacturer says put a fucking gasket in, you do it . Silly me.

  17. #92
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wishing I were in Asia somewhere!
    Posts
    10,964
    Blog entries
    5
    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    It looked good until we had to cram a dozen towels all over the floor to get the leaks. Me, I follow instructions. Rj, not so much: gasket, what gasket? I figure, the manufacturer says put a fucking gasket in, you do it . Silly me.
    Why do you let him do such things?
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  18. #93
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Emerald Coast
    Posts
    18,061
    The gasket was unrelated to the leak. The leak is corrected. The instructions referred to several models of faucets. Sometimes a manufacturer adds extra parts for the other models. They do that to mess mess with your mind. Parts are parts. They don't exist in my mind--what little I have.

    At least she called me a "man." I am vindicated...and going golfing.

    FML.
    Habitual Offender

  19. #94
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 1999
    Location
    400 miles from Orlando
    Posts
    13,861
    Quote Originally posted by kjel View post
    Why do you let him do such things?
    Like I said in another thread, I threw a few "dire warning" hints out, and then poured myself a glass of wine. Oh,and later, got all the towels, laundered the towels...men and directions, ya know?

  20. #95
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Emerald Coast
    Posts
    18,061
    The toilet paper holder in the half-bath (used exclusively by yours truly), is ready to fall from its mounting. The question I have for Cyburbia's throbbing brian: do I let it fall completely off the wall or do I proactively repair it? These types of decisions perplex me.
    Habitual Offender

  21. #96
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a 480 square foot ex baseball nacho stand
    Posts
    10,638
    Quote Originally posted by Richmond Jake View post
    The toilet paper holder in the half-bath (used exclusively by yours truly), is ready to fall from its mounting. The question I have for Cyburbia's throbbing brian: do I let it fall completely off the wall or do I proactively repair it? These types of decisions perplex me.
    Go ahead and do it proactively because it will fall off at the most inappropriate time - plus you're (supposedly) a planner and tend to do most things proactively. Make sure you have a glass of wine before, during and after the tedious job.
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  22. #97
    Mod Gedunker's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2003
    Location
    The Wonderland Way
    Posts
    10,137
    Quote Originally posted by Richmond Jake View post
    The toilet paper holder in the half-bath (used exclusively by yours truly), is ready to fall from its mounting. The question I have for Cyburbia's throbbing brian: do I let it fall completely off the wall or do I proactively repair it? These types of decisions perplex me.
    Stop leaning on it when you get off the crapper, old man!

    Porcelain or mounted on drywall? Porcelain is probably not the area you want to mess with as a duffer. If it's drywall, then you can knock the repair out pretty easily.
    Not valid without corporate seal

  23. #98
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Apr 2013
    Location
    the Bible belt
    Posts
    751
    Last weekend I thought I'd take stock of the basement bathroom and see what might be involved in installing new self-stick tile. Husband stopped me after I got the baseboards pried off, filled and sanded, wall base primed, and the old linoleum pulled up. I guess I'm committed to the project now...

  24. #99
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,075
    Quote Originally posted by Planit View post
    ...plus you're (supposedly) a planner and tend to do most things proactively...
    Don't really understand yet how the planning profession worke, maybe?


    1. Identify that there might be a problem with the toilet paper holder. Discuss internally.
    2. Approach management to let (her) know about the problem. Receive encouragement to address the problem.
    3. Request funding in 2014 budget to hire a consultant to study the problem. Funding request denied. Wait one year.
    4. Apply for grant to offset some of the cost. Receive grant requiring 50 percent match.
    5. Request funding in 2015 budget to hire a consultant to study the problem. Funding approved.
    6. Process grant paperwork. By October you are ready to solicit proposals from consultants.
    7. Selected consultant starts work in January 2016. Process begins with stakeholder interviews (household residents, visitors, lender, neighbors, local handyman, etc.) and culminates in three options: a) do nothing; b) repair existing toilet paper dispenser, and c) install new toilet paper dispenser. These are presented at a public meeting where everybody comes to a consensus.
    8. Final plan is submitted and adopted. Funds are requested in the 2017 budget to implement recommended option.
    9. Management nixes budget request and directs internal staff to "fix the problem".

    That is how a planner does it.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  25. #100
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Emerald Coast
    Posts
    18,061
    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    Don't really understand yet how the planning profession works, maybe?

    .....

    That is how a planner does it.
    Can we agree the project is exempt from environmental review?
    Habitual Offender

+ Reply to thread
Page 4 of 26 FirstFirst ... 3 4 5 14 ... LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. $400 Home Improvement Project
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 17
    Last post: 06 Oct 2008, 11:23 AM
  2. Street improvement district
    Transportation Planning
    Replies: 1
    Last post: 26 Mar 2008, 10:25 AM
  3. Replies: 13
    Last post: 17 Jan 2008, 11:53 AM
  4. home improvement question
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 7
    Last post: 20 May 2005, 11:32 PM
  5. Home Improvement questions...
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 17
    Last post: 22 Jan 2005, 8:58 AM