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Thread: Mature trees and planting regulations

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    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Mature trees and planting regulations

    Does anyone have any knowledge of ordinances requiring that mature trees be planted in new residential developments, instead of young trees that take years to grow? Is this even possible? Thanks.
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    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage
    Does anyone have any knowledge of ordinances requiring that mature trees be planted in new residential developments, instead of young trees that take years to grow? Is this even possible? Thanks.
    My understanding is that about 8 inch caliper trees are about the largest that can be transplanted without harm. Anything bigger than that would be financially impractical.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

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    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Thanks. Thats what I've been able to gather as well.
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

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    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    I've noticed that municipalities try to force developers to not cut down mature trees on the property if they can help it. I've noticed this in my area, and it does look lovely having 75-year old trees at the entrance to the subdivision, rather than 3 month old shrubs.
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  5. #5

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    To add to Mendehlman's comment: transplanting mature trees may work fine as a short term expedient, but using reasonably sized young trees will work much better over the long term.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    My communities are in climate zone "5". We discourage transplanting over 1.5" caliper, as the mortality rate is too high on larger transplants.

  7. #7
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage
    Does anyone have any knowledge of --> ordinances <-- requiring that ...[snip].
    Moderator note:
    This looks like one for the Zoning, Land Use and Development Control subforum. I'll move it there for you.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Streck's avatar
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    A gulf coast casino relocated oaks that must have been almost 100 years old and were three to four feet caliper. They were severely pruned by professionals, and a flexible tube irrigation system was installed unobtrusively along major branches in the tree. There was a massive root ball that went along too. The trees have survived several years now, but it takes mature trees several years to die.

    Horticulturalists tell me that small young trees will out pace and out grow lager transplanted trees.

    We require both larger caliper trees and smaller caliper trees. The young ones will eventually overtake the older ones, but they have served their purpose for "instant charm," "immediate gratification," and quick leasing/sales.

    For subdivisions, we require a general tree survey for conceptual street planning purposes and staff goes to the site and tries to identify specimen trees (if any) that can be worked and protected with the developer's plan.

    On individual lots, we prohibit clear cutting, but allow removal of trees and stumps at approved house pad plus 10 feet (should be 20 feet) and driveways, and approved transitions of lot to street.

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