Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 154

Thread: Favorite Under-Rated Cities

  1. #26

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    Gary would be a commuter suburb right now if US Steel weren't taking up the entire lakefront. It's less than an hour from Chicago by train right up next to what would be some amazing dune shores.
    But, it's pretty much a sad, devastated place right now. I'm not sure I would consider it under-rated.

  2. #27
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Jan 2005
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    64
    My choices...

    Duluth, MN -- A city just under 100,000 on the western terminus of Lake Superior. The downtown is large for the city's size, featuring several 10+ buildings, many dating back to the boom years of the mining and forestry industries earlier in the 20th century. The downtown is adjacent to Lake Superior, and many buildings offer fantastic views. The Canal Park neighborhood, which basically separates the Duluth Harbor from Lake Superior, has been renovated and restored in recent years, and is full of restaurants, bars, and shops in renovated historic warehouse buildings. The city practically oozes character, and feels a bit like a taste of New England in the Midwest. East Duluth, which stretches along the lake, features historic mansions with breathtaking lots, while blue-collar West Duluth features a childhood home of Bob Dylan. Upper Duluth, which is up the hill from downtown, offers the more modern amenities such as malls and grocery stores. The presence of the water often means the city (except for Upper Duluth) is 10-15 degrees warmer than surrounding areas in winter, and 10-15 degrees cooler than surrounding areas in summer. All this, and reasonable house prices.

    Providence, RI -- My first taste of Providence was catching a Providence Bruins AHL game at the Civic Center, then walking around the charming downtown, stopping at a great bar/restaurant in a historic building, then walking over to the large outdoor skating rink on a 32-degree night with lightly falling snow. Talk about falling in love with a place -- does it get any better than that!?! The downtown was full of people, particularly young people -- a college-town type vibe, but with a lot more to do that most college towns. Even the new mall downtown was tastefully designed, and the riverfront was very nicely finished. And all this at a fraction of the price of Boston!

  3. #28
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,169
    I had a business trip several years ago with an old job to Duluth and I was very impressed. The people were nice, the layout was compact and the lake was beautiful.

  4. #29
    Member
    Registered
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    11

    Duluth is great,

    although I must admit some bias there, being from Minnesota. There's nothing quite as thrilling as driving down those steep, ice-glazed streets with bald tires! Plus, the cold weather keeps away a lot of the riff-raff. And don't even get me started on the breathtaking views of Lake Superior...

  5. #30
    Cyburbian drucee's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    229
    TORONTO.
    Why, oh why, does this city get so few leisure tourists?

  6. #31

    Registered
    May 1997
    Location
    Williston, VT
    Posts
    1,371
    I got my first close look at Portsmouth, NH last Saturday. It is an overlooked gem!

    I have overlooked most of the other places people list (although I am not a fan of the Springs and even less so of Wichita). I was thinking of out-of-way places that are not too small where I have had a good time. How about Quincy, IL? And while it is not small, I think most people under-rate Indianapolis. I could think of more, but I am trying to get the draft plan out.

  7. #32

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    Quote Originally posted by Lee Nellis
    I got my first close look at Portsmouth, NH last Saturday. It is an overlooked gem!

    I have overlooked most of the other places people list (although I am not a fan of the Springs and even less so of Wichita). I was thinking of out-of-way places that are not too small where I have had a good time. How about Quincy, IL? And while it is not small, I think most people under-rate Indianapolis. I could think of more, but I am trying to get the draft plan out.

    Indy has a great downtown, now. Who would have thought "lofts" in downtown Indy?

  8. #33
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,247
    Quote Originally posted by drucee
    TORONTO.
    Why, oh why, does this city get so few leisure tourists?
    Might be because its expensive, most of the architecture (not all) is quite bland, it is overcrowded with bums hassling you everywhere. You'd be better off vacationing in Lake Simcoe or other northern lake regions?

    Toronto does offer a great choice of theatre, shopping, nice lakeside parks, some very interesting neighborhoods, but unfortunately your average tourist is more interested in casinos than checking out neighborhoods or great transit systems.

  9. #34
    I've never seen too many panhandlers in Toronto, and the ones I have were more polite (and less drugged out) than any I've seen anywhere on the East Coast. In fact, my American instincts had me snubbing some guy outside Bloor-Younge station without thinking twice, while my Canadian companions stopped and very courteously told him, "no thanks." I've never heard anybody complain that it was "overcrowded with bums." What part of the city is this? I was all over Toronto this summer and barely saw more than a couple, who were minding their own business and not harassing at all.

    I think Toronto doesn't get much American tourism because most of us aren't familiar with Canada and don't think of it as an urban destination. Plus, it's a bit of a hike from most American population centers on the coasts, and not "exotic" French Quebec or the ski slopes of British Columbia.

  10. #35
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,236
    Toronto does have a reputation for blandness that is totally unfounded. However, I agree with DetroitPlanner that while it may be an amazing city for an urbanist or urban planner to explore, it doesn't have anything to offer your "typical" tourist from the United States that they couldn't get at a conventional tourist mecca like New York or San Francisco.. or maybe Orlando or Las Vegas.

    Give people from the 'states a word association test with Toronto and they'll probably come up blank, maybe mention the CN tower (which is really silly anyway), or something else out of Canadian Bacon. At least Montreal has the French thing going for it.

  11. #36
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North
    Marquette, MI.....The biggest city in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is also home to a bike trail system considered among the best in the nation, has a beautiful shoreline along the greatest body of water in the world, is surrounded by beautiful forests, hundreds of smaller lakes, rugged hills. The downtown area is attractive and olde.....very "interestingly" olde.

    Steep hills in the city add adventure to a bike ride or a stick-shift car ride. Northern Michigan University dominates the north end of town, very near a wonderful peninsula of land that is a great park.....Presque Isle. Many of the suburbs are original "company towns", built for and all about the iron ore mining that was so strong at one (1) time.
    Marquette is indeed a neat little town. Sandy beaches, marina waterfront, street grid cut oiver the hilly terrain, blocks of houses with large rock outcroppings in their front yards, turn-of-the-century buildings made of red sandstone, the partially dismantled iron ore dock in the harbor made for an interesting piece of industrial archeology...

    Natives talk in that famous "Da Yoopee" style, as they drive their rusted Chevys (that's a song) to "da fish camp".
    Oh, rust and smoke, the heater's broke, the door just blew away,
    I light a match to see the dash, and then I start to pray-ay.
    The frame is bent, the muffler went, the radio it's okay,
    Oh what fun it is to drive this rusty Cheverolet...

  12. #37
    Member
    Registered
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    Indy has a great downtown, now. Who would have thought "lofts" in downtown Indy?
    Word. I live in a 1920's apartment building in Minneapolis, and the adjacent property owner decided to clear the lot and put up a new tri-plex. He's calling it the "Flats at 2400." Um...so...did the Old World suddenly make its way to the midwestern United States? I'm confused. We've never had "flats" here before!!! All this change!!! What is a urban geek like me to do?!

  13. #38

    Registered
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    6,468
    Quote Originally posted by pinkpoodle
    Word. I live in a 1920's apartment building in Minneapolis, and the adjacent property owner decided to clear the lot and put up a new tri-plex. He's calling it the "Flats at 2400." Um...so...did the Old World suddenly make its way to the midwestern United States? I'm confused. We've never had "flats" here before!!! All this change!!! What is a urban geek like me to do?!
    Just submit. Coastal Elitism s will conquor all.

  14. #39
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,247
    Quote Originally posted by passdoubt
    I've never seen too many panhandlers in Toronto, and the ones I have were more polite (and less drugged out) than any I've seen anywhere on the East Coast. I've never heard anybody complain that it was "overcrowded with bums." What part of the city is this? I was all over Toronto this summer and barely saw more than a couple, who were minding their own business and not harassing at all.
    My last experience in this town was about four years ago and I vowed I would never be back. There were bums everywhere up and down Younge, Bloor, other thoughoughfares, sleeping in doorways or squeege-ing cars windows much to the protest of the drivers, then demanding tip money. It was to the point in somoe areas that while you waited for a light you would have two or three hassling you for change, then once you crossed the street and landed on the next corner there would surely be a couple of more waiting for you.

    I'm glad to see that this has been cleaned up. Being from Detroit, we don't have a serious bum problem, there are bums to be sure, but it being as cold as Toronto, with only a few streets teaming with pedestrians, they go elsewhere to ply their trade.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    7,321

    Yup....

    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    Toronto does have a reputation for blandness that is totally unfounded. However, I agree with DetroitPlanner that while it may be an amazing city for an urbanist or urban planner to explore, it doesn't have anything to offer your "typical" tourist from the United States that they couldn't get at a conventional tourist mecca like New York or San Francisco.. or maybe Orlando or Las Vegas.

    Give people from the 'states a word association test with Toronto and they'll probably come up blank, maybe mention the CN tower (which is really silly anyway), or something else out of Canadian Bacon. At least Montreal has the French thing going for it.
    I have to admit, that the first thing I thought about when I read Toronto above.....was MILK TOAST.... But I don't know why....I've never been there and have NOTHING against the place......and I like Canada in general.......maybe they need an advertising campaign.....???
    Last edited by The One; 22 Sep 2005 at 11:12 AM.
    Skilled Adoxographer

  16. #41
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Staff meeting
    Posts
    8,321
    Off-topic:
    Quote Originally posted by The One
    ....maybe they need an advertising campaign.....???
    That's a good idea. How's this?
    Last edited by mendelman; 17 Nov 2005 at 11:25 AM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  17. #42
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    7,321

    Ahh.......Suuuurrreee.....

    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner
    Colorado Springs, CO (really seems like a nice city, and has a heck of a lot of people. It always baffles me that they can never get big-name concert acts to perform at the World Arena. Yes, it's undergoing lots of sprawl, but I hear there's a lot of bustling activity going around downtown)
    )

    A gun in every glove box and a bible under every seat.......yeah, that's a good mixture of Americana and up until recently (I hope) where else could you have three 20 megaton nuclear devices aimed at your head 24/7/365 Oh and don't forget, the famously tolerant politics .....Anybody remember the show PASS THE AMMO? What a great show......should be a required rental before moving to the Springs..... But hey, at least they have a great zoo......


    THE ONE isssssss OUT!
    Skilled Adoxographer

  18. #43
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    City of Low Low Wages!
    Posts
    3,236
    Quote Originally posted by pinkpoodle
    Word. I live in a 1920's apartment building in Minneapolis, and the adjacent property owner decided to clear the lot and put up a new tri-plex. He's calling it the "Flats at 2400." Um...so...did the Old World suddenly make its way to the midwestern United States? I'm confused. We've never had "flats" here before!!! All this change!!! What is a urban geek like me to do?!
    "Plex"es have always been called "flats" in Chicago. In Boston too, I believe.

    "Flat" is a synonym for "apartement" in British, which is different than a Chicago or Boston flat.

  19. #44
    I agree with Ithica, Colorado Springs and Louisville, but Albany, NY. I grew up in Albany and was never impressed, but haven't been back in a while. It wasn't much in the early 90's (last time I was there).

    I would add St Mary's GA. This is a very quaint city and will remain that way because it will not recieve the submarines from CN. St Mary's is home to Queens Bay Submarine Base. It was to recieve the subs from CN and the local planners were scrambling to deal with the influx of personnel and the expected housing boom.

  20. #45
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Clayobyrne, CB
    Posts
    2,581
    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    "Plex"es have always been called "flats" in Chicago. In Boston too, I believe.
    No, we don't have "-plexes" or "flats." In Boston we have apartments, condos and houses. An apartment you rent, a condo you own and a house you can either rent or own. Apartments and condos can be in two-families, three-families (three-deckers, triple-deckers), four-families, etc., or complexes. Floor-throughs are apartments or condos that take up a whole floor. Sometimes two-story apartments and condos are referred to as duplexes.

    In Rhode Island and most of Massachusetts, a duplex is a two-family with side-by-side units, never up-down units.

  21. #46
    Member
    Registered
    Sep 2005
    Location
    new york
    Posts
    4
    I'm not telling what my favorite city is .I don't want you guys to find out, gentrify the place, raise the rent prices, so I can't afford to move there anymore.

  22. #47
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2005
    Location
    The Fox Valley
    Posts
    4,762
    Blog entries
    1
    Quote Originally posted by The One
    A gun in every glove box and a bible under every seat.......yeah, that's a good mixture of Americana
    Sounds fine by me!
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  23. #48

    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    The foggy isle of Vinalhaven
    Posts
    196
    Quote Originally posted by Seabishop
    Everybody's favorite eminent domain abusers . . . New London, CT.

    Portsmouth, NH and Portland, ME - although most people who have been there don't under-appreciate them.
    Here Here! Everyone forgets the Portland of the East! A fine, fine city to be sure...
    (and Portsmouth ain't bad, either)

  24. #49
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    at the neighboring pub
    Posts
    5,344
    Quote Originally posted by MaineMan
    Here Here! Everyone forgets the Portland of the East! A fine, fine city to be sure...
    (and Portsmouth ain't bad, either)
    My wife has been and I hope to get up there sometime in the near future. I've heard that the whole state is beautiful!

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  25. #50
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    De Noc
    Posts
    18,161
    My Fair City - Evansville, IN.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

+ Reply to thread
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 ... LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 18
    Last post: 09 Jul 2008, 8:02 AM
  2. Favorite cities to study in
    Student Commons
    Replies: 14
    Last post: 03 Dec 2007, 6:41 PM
  3. Replies: 11
    Last post: 04 Oct 2004, 11:17 AM
  4. What's your life rated?
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 36
    Last post: 12 Jul 2004, 12:50 PM