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Thread: Real estate development specializations

  1. #1
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    Real estate development specializations

    I am looking at Masters in Urban Planning programs for Fall '06 and I think that I'd like to specialize in Real Estate Development. I thought this would be a good way to get a public policy background but also be able to do something outside of working for a local government and possibly make more money. So having said that, I have two questions:

    1) Is this an accurate assessment or just completely naive?
    2) Which schools have good programs in Real Estate Development in the Midwest and East Coast (I've been looking at Michigan and CUNY Hunter College)?

    Any advice would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
    I don't know of any MURPs that offer RE specializations per se. Instead, there's land development concentrations which has more of a planning bent. Many schools are offering certificates in RE that you might want to look into. I know U of British Columbia offers one online.

    To answer your question, yes, a MURP, in any concentration, is a good ticket into planning and RE development, usually the former first before the latter.

    Below are a US News RE dept ranking and UMich's RE dept's infamous RE career matrix.
    ---------------------------
    Top 12 US University Departments of Real Estate Ranked (w/ links!)

    REAL ESTATE (Ranked in 2001)

    1. University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)
    2. University of California--Berkeley (Haas)
    3. New York University
    3. Ohio State University--Columbus (Fisher)
    5. Univ. of Wisconsin--Madison
    6. University of Georgia (Terry)
    7. U. of Illinios--Urbana-Champaign
    8. Georgia State University (Robinson)
    8. Indiana University--Bloomington (Kelley)
    8. University of Connecticut
    11. Univ. of Southern California (Marshall)
    12. Penn. State U.--University Park (Smeal)
    12. University of Texas--Austin (McCobs)

    Source: US News & World Report
    --------------------------
    Real Estate Career Matrix c/o UMich
    http://www.umich.edu/~reecon/restate/index.htm

  3. #3
    St. Louis University offers a masters in "Urban Planning and Real Estate Development." Sounds like it'd be right up your alley, but I don't know anything about the program.

  4. #4
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    If you are interested in a Master's of City Planning along with real estate development on the East Coast, I would look into the following programs:

    1) University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill- In their Master's of City and Regional Planning Degree- they offer a Community Development specialization. Within that specialization, they offer a Real Estate Development submajor. Good program- bad news- the deadline is early- Dec. 1.

    You can find more info here:

    http://www.planning.unc.edu/program/masters.htm

    2) University of Pennslyvania-they offer a real estate certificate, which is open to masters students already enrolled in City Planning as well as other programs -Architecture, Historic Preservation, Landscape Architecture.

    http://www.design.upenn.edu/new/real/cert.htm

    This certificate could add time to your degree- making it into a 3 year program- I don't know for sure- I would check it out.

    3) University of Florida- if you're going to spend three years, then you could probably do the Master's here in Urban Planning (2 years) and their 1 year Master's degree in Real Estate

    http://www.cba.ufl.edu/fire/programs/msre/

    4) Columbia University- They also have a Master's in Urban Planning (2 years) and a 1 year Master's degree in Real Estate Development

    http://www.arch.columbia.edu/

    Other than the program at Michigan, I'm not sure of other programs like this in the Midwest. Anyway, this should help you out.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Michigan??? The school offers something else besides being a home for misfit architects whishing to cure the worlds evils through pretty pictures of far-out buildings?

    Actually I went to the link that was posted. It brought me some hope in the program that seems to be set-up only so that planning students can call me and blame me for sprawl, our bad transit system, and how widening of intersections to reduce car crashes is inheriently evil.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by mccart95
    I am looking at Masters in Urban Planning programs for Fall '06 and I think that I'd like to specialize in Real Estate Development. I thought this would be a good way to get a public policy background but also be able to do something outside of working for a local government and possibly make more money. So having said that, I have two questions:

    1) Is this an accurate assessment or just completely naive?
    2) Which schools have good programs in Real Estate Development in the Midwest and East Coast (I've been looking at Michigan and CUNY Hunter College)?

    Any advice would be much appreciated.
    I earned a MS in Real Estate from NYU in 2001. I went part time - it took me 3 years. I recommend the program. Lots of NYU graduates get development jobs following graduation. I got hired as manager of international development and acquisitions for a real estate investment trust. The NYU program is respected in New York City, even though the quality of students is mixed.

    I recommend NYU over CUNY - I've never heard of CUNY's real estate program but everyone in New York knows about NYU's program. Keep in mind New York cost of living is very high.

    No matter what program you choose, I recommend a finance concentration even if your goal is development and a development concentration is available. The reason is finance and investment analysis stuff is learned better in a classroom setting while development things like negotiating with zoning boards and haggling with contractors can only be learned on the job.

    Yes, you will make more $ working for a large developer than you will as a planner. The real $ is made by principals at the development firm and by the real estate financiers. Real estate finance is a huge business in New York.

  7. #7
    Kobayashi's avatar
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    The Rutgers Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy has a concentration in housing and real estate. http://policy.rutgers.edu/uppd/concentrations.html

    Housing and Real Estate
    Faculty Advisers
    David Listokin (co-coordinator), Robert Burchell (co-coordinator), Donald Krueckeberg, Judith Grant Long
    A broad understanding of housing and development planning, housing economics and markets, land and building analysis, development, and marketing processes, particularly in the United States, is gained through a sequence of courses in development planning and practice; real estate research, finance, and investment; and housing impact analysis. This concentration meets the needs of students with varying interests, including planning for development, real estate market research and analysis, real estate finance and investment analysis, and relating land-use planning and controls to the private development process. Students must take at least two of the four required courses, and at least four courses total in the concentration. Two graduate planning studios covering the following topics are strongly recommended: historic preservation, housing, urban design, neighborhood revitalization, or community development.

    Required Courses (select two of the four)
    34:970:528 Housing Economics and Markets
    34:970:529 Principles of Housing
    34:970:604 Land Development Practice
    34:970:622 Urban Redevelopment

    Recommended Courses
    34:833:540 State and Local Public Finance
    34:970:508 Comprehensive Planning
    34:970:512 History of Planning Thought
    34:970:521 Historic Preservation
    34:970:523 Legal Aspects of Environmental Planning
    34:970:525 Property Theory and Policy
    34:970:541 Planning for New Communities
    34:970:558 Public Transit Planning and Management
    34:970:575 Locational Conflict
    34:970:601 Introduction to Planning and Design
    34:970:602 Zoning for Communities of Place
    34:970:618 Environmental Planning and Management
    Princeton ARC 401 Theories of Housing and Urbanism
    Princeton WWS 508 Econometrics and Public Policy
    Princeton WWS 538 Politics and Policymaking in Metropolitan Areas
    Anyone here in the Rutgers program?

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