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Thread: High-rise new urbanism

  1. #1

    High-rise new urbanism

    I would like to get any opinions from the discussion group
    about the possibility of applying the principles of New
    Urbanism to a high-rise development. has it been done
    before?

    Any and all comments are welcome! Thanks a heap!

  2. #2

    High-rise New Urbanism

    I came across a topic entitled "High-rise New Urbanism".
    I was hoping that someone can forward me the text becuase this
    is crucial to my Urban Design dissertation on the applicability
    of New Urbanist principles in high-density setting like Hong Kong.

    Thanks a lot!

    Arim Fermin
    M Urban Design candidate
    University of Hong Kong

  3. #3
    Member
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    Studying Urban Design in UHK

    Hi Fermin,

    I guess you have graduated from HKU by now. I have been accepted in the MUD for next September.
    Could tell me more about the programme? Did you learn a lot? Where are your working now?

    Thank you in advance for your reply.


    Jennifer

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    There are some examples around the Toronto area, this is a new urbanism subdivison with a mix of low, medium and high density development, I think if your going to add high-rises, there as to be low and medium density around the high-rise, rather than all high density development.

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...5.69,,0,-10.71

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,166.9,,0,2.15

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...64.52,,0,-5.42

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally posted by buckie33 View post
    There are some examples around the Toronto area, this is a new urbanism subdivison with a mix of low, medium and high density development, I think if your going to add high-rises, there as to be low and medium density around the high-rise, rather than all high density development.

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...5.69,,0,-10.71

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,166.9,,0,2.15

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...64.52,,0,-5.42
    Ehhh...I fail to see the point of development like that if there is no rapid transit connection to the urban core.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    That subdivision looks like it has more in common with Le Corbusier than the New Urbanism. The closure ratios are awful. The streets are wide, and the setbacks are asinine. The mix of high-rises with rowhouses is rather inept. The whole thing looks like the antithesis of a walkable place with a strong personality. And, at least, in Google Street View, no pedestrians are visible.
    Last edited by Pragmatic Idealist; 27 Sep 2010 at 6:18 AM.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    PI, I agree on the personality, but that is not le Courbousier-like project at all. With LC it was density of buildings vs a lot of shared space. Townhouses have a bit of green in front of them establishing a personal outside space and the mid rises are just typical with some NU elements applied to the facades.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  8. #8
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    You could take a look at Vancouver's strategy of running townhouses around the perimeter of high rise buildings to give the street a more human-scaled feel.

    It seems to me that there would be two main considerations when trying to reconcile high rise living with new urbanism:

    How the high rise meets the street--not a blank wall, but storefronts, townhomes, etc.
    That the high rise does not serve as a gated community (there's not a private store in the high rise, for example).

    Interesting question. I'm sure you could make something out of this.


    Luke

  9. #9
    Cyburbian stroskey's avatar
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    Here is one from St Paul MN that differs from the Toronto example because it is in a city and not some highway offramp like most NU developments. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...276.01,,0,0.41

    Another one in St Paul MN. Nasty colors but it includes little shops which make it more attractive in my book.
    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,39.31,,0,5.34
    I burned down the church to atone for my transgressions.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally posted by stroskey View post
    Here is one from St Paul MN that differs from the Toronto example because it is in a city and not some highway offramp like most NU developments. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...276.01,,0,0.41

    Another one in St Paul MN. Nasty colors but it includes little shops which make it more attractive in my book.
    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...,39.31,,0,5.34

    I'm not a fan of how either are treated at ground level. The pedestrian realm in both consists of a small patch of grass and a brick wall. Although, the second location seems a little more animated since their is some pedestrian activity.

    But better to have people in the city than high-density sprawl masquerading as New Urbanism for marketing purposes.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    If you can't identify the Transect Zone of a place, then it's not New Urbanist.

    These developments seem very confused. There is no real clarity of the position they occupy on the rural-to-urban Transect. And, they all seem to lack sufficient closure ratios with vista termini.

    I, personally, cannot see myself ever walking in such places or hanging-out in any of them.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian
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    Ok, how abouts this, this is near Downtown Toronto, on Lake Ontario so everything is in walking distance, or close to streetcar/subway.

    The other side of this development is a marina.

    http://maps.google.ca/?ie=UTF8&ll=43...290.5,,0,-8.27

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