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Poll results: Are we experiencing a comics renaissance?

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  • Yes

    7 33.33%
  • No

    7 33.33%
  • Maybe so - I will explain below

    7 33.33%
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Thread: A Comics Renaissance?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    A Comics Renaissance?

    There is a poll with this thread: Are we experiencing a comics renaissance?

    Look at your local newspaper comics section. Do you see Calvin & Hobbes there? Can you believe it, they are reprinting these classic comics!! I am so happy! And have you browsed through the New Yowk Times magazine lately? The have a section called the Funny Pages. There is really only one comic there, and it's called Building Stories, by Chris Ware, acclaimed cartoonist, editor of McSweeney's #13, and the genius behind Jimmy Corrigan and the Acme Novelty Library. And he's from the Windy City.

    I love it! Great comics are back in the mainstream!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    I am not sure. The only change that I have seen is turning comic book characters into movies.

    But then again, they might be. I still wish that they would start doing more Far Side Cartoons.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  3. #3
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    There is a poll with this thread: Are we experiencing a comics renaissance?

    Look at your local newspaper comics section. Do you see Calvin & Hobbes there? Can you believe it, they are reprinting these classic comics!! I am so happy! And have you browsed through the New Yowk Times magazine lately? The have a section called the Funny Pages. There is really only one comic there, and it's called Building Stories, by Chris Ware, acclaimed cartoonist, editor of McSweeney's #13, and the genius behind Jimmy Corrigan and the Acme Novelty Library. And he's from the Windy City.

    I love it! Great comics are back in the mainstream!
    I'm upset to no end that Gannett dropped Prince Valiant from their Wisconsin papers to make room for the C&H reprints

    In its first few decades, PV was given an ENTIRE PAGE of a Sunday comics section, the art and storyline were that good.

    Printed pages have a way of firing imaginations in ways that no animation can, too, and for that, I have always been a fan of newspaper comics.

    Mike

  4. #4
    I voted "maybe so..." because the Calvin and Hobbes strips, though greatly appreciated, are re-runs and will be short-lived. Watterson is publishing the entire compendium in a single-vaolume and this is a way to get the word out.

    Still, my daily runs 1" tall re-runs of Peanuts every freakin' single day. Peanuts was great, but ... they are taking up space from new folks who ought to be given a chance. Good-bye already, Charlie Brown!

    There remain a lot of dull, vapid strips out there like 3-G and the serial strips. Family Circus is a waste of ink, IMO, as is Ziggy. Garfield hasn't had an original strip since 1989. It's probably best that I don't get started ...
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
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  5. #5
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Well, there are a lot of great comix out there now and the internet has provided unprecedented public access to thousands of small/indie/underground/artistic comics that would otherwise be seen by next to nobody. I think the comics scene is pretty comparable to the music scene in this regard. Alot of rock critics, for example, might say that the 70's or the 80's or whatever decade were artistic lowpoints and in terms of mainstream exposure they can make that case. The truth is, though, that lots of incredibly original and creative music was being produced at the time, but it never saw the light of day. Same thing with comics. We're getting the chance to see a lot more great stuff thanks to changes in the publishing industry.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    The only change that I have seen is turning comic book characters into movies
    Yeah, I know! Isn't it crazy?! Hollywood certainly is mining the superhero genre, milking it for all it can get. Has there been any good comic adapted movies, lately? Fantastic Four? Batman? Hellboy? The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen? Spider Man? X-Men? Men in Black? Mystery Men?

    But we're talking comics here, not neccessarily superheroes: Comics is the medium, superheroes is just a genre, like westerns or romance comics.

    Quote Originally posted by mgk920
    I have always been a fan of newspaper comics.
    You need to check out what Chris Ware does. He has his own comic language. And what he does can only be created in the comics medium. This is from his Jimmy Corrigan book:


  7. #7
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Anyone here, maybe more of the European Cyburbians, ever read Tintin and Asterix comics. I remember reading those all the time when i was younger and was thinking of finding/restarting my collection.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Boru's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Anyone here, maybe more of the European Cyburbians, ever read Tintin and Asterix comics. I remember reading those all the time when i was younger and was thinking of finding/restarting my collection.
    I hated Tintin when I was younger. Asterix was the main man, but now it has to be said as a responsible adult, that the artwork in Tintin is superb, while that in Asterix is a bit ridiculous. Good to have around to keep kids quiet, should any nieces or nephews call arouns, but a bit odd for a fully grown man. Tintin however has a certain pizazz.

    I have a massive collection of 2000AD comics (think every original idea in sci-fi and real life over the last 30 years, then re-read 2000AD and they thought of it first.) They were given to me by my uncle a few weeks before my final exams from secondary school, for which my parents will never forgive the man, seeing as how I read them rather than studying very hard. They seem to have fallen out of favour, but I hope they become valuable again. I have about a thousand of them, so heres hoping.

    Tintin. Defo.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Boru
    I hated Tintin when I was younger. Asterix was the main man, but now it has to be said as a responsible adult, that the artwork in Tintin is superb, while that in Asterix is a bit ridiculous. Good to have around to keep kids quiet, should any nieces or nephews call arouns, but a bit odd for a fully grown man. Tintin however has a certain pizazz.

    Tintin. Defo.
    I have to agree with you. Although I still, as an adult, enjoy a good Tintin story every now and then. The artwork is great though.
    I recall in school the Asterix was a little less serious than Tintin, and I have always thought Tintin to be vastly superior. IMHO.
    I will have to visit the bookstore and see if they have any Tintin on the shelves, it is pretty hard to find in the States, although I have not looked recently.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    I love Tintin! I don't really know how I first found out about Tintin, because both my sister and I have been reading the Tintin books since childhood. In the last few years, people have given me some of the books for Christmas. And I had a Tintin pocket appointment book in 2004 - there are lots of fun Tintin toys out there.

    zmanPLAN: You can find Tintin in the children's section of most fine booksellers. Even our local Borders and Barnes & Noble carry them.

    Back on topic: Our local paper isn't carrying the Calvin & Hobbes reruns.

  11. #11
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Anyone here, maybe more of the European Cyburbians, ever read Tintin and Asterix comics. I remember reading those all the time when i was younger and was thinking of finding/restarting my collection.
    Used to read Tintin relgiously as a lad. Was featured in "Children's Digest" magazine each month.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  12. #12
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Mud Princess
    I love Tintin! I don't really know how I first found out about Tintin, because both my sister and I have been reading the Tintin books since childhood. In the last few years, people have given me some of the books for Christmas. And I had a Tintin pocket appointment book in 2004 - there are lots of fun Tintin toys out there.

    zmanPLAN: You can find Tintin in the children's section of most fine booksellers. Even our local Borders and Barnes & Noble carry them.

    Back on topic: Our local paper isn't carrying the Calvin & Hobbes reruns.

    For the first time... WIKI comes to the rescue...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintin

    I never knew Captain Haddock's first name was Archibald... hmmm... after Planning Commission tonight, it may be time to go to my archives (i.e. old boxes in the basement) and dig up these old classics
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  13. #13
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    I have 10 issues or so of asterix, bought as an adult and an asterix head pin.

    I think that as the general masses disposable income increases, our consumption of ephemera increases.

    As for Tin Tin, ask Tranplanner about the rocket ship we saw the other day.

    As fo rcomics, they never go out of style, just the openess of admitting you read and collect them, or at least that is what I tell my self as I look at my original artwork and book collection.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  14. #14
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Oh Yeah!!

    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Anyone here, maybe more of the European Cyburbians, ever read Tintin and Asterix comics. I remember reading those all the time when i was younger and was thinking of finding/restarting my collection.
    I loved both, but it was rare to find these outside the largest US cities....no one had a clue in the back woods of Colorado when I was growing up.....got hooked by my mainstream family from back east I was looking at the wall of Asterix and Tintin in the local Barnes and Noble....kinda wanted to buy them all....but would have been about $400!! $11 each!!
    Skilled Adoxographer

  15. #15
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by donk
    As for Tin Tin, ask Tranplanner about the rocket ship we saw the other day.
    Okay.

    "Hey, Tranplanner, what was it about the rocket ship you and Donk saw the other day?"
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  16. #16
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    I don't read the newspaper very often, but when I do, one of the first stops is the comics.

    I'm really into the one with the pre-adolescent Black boys....you know....the one that has social and cultural commentary.....I can't remember the name right now.....

    Btw, Wanigas?, that comic you posted appears very esoteric....for me, at least. I'll try to dicepher it later this evening.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One
    I was looking at the wall of Asterix and Tintin in the local Barnes and Noble....kinda wanted to buy them all....but would have been about $400!! $11 each!!
    B&N has a whole wall of Asterix? Wow, that's amazing, I never knew how popular those were! What about manga at B&N? Ever go to the graphic novel section and notice that 75% is now manga? Just three years ago it seemed like manga was barely even 25% of the mainstrean comics market. To me, these trends just validate how mainstrean comics are becoming.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One
    I loved both, but it was rare to find these outside the largest US cities....no one had a clue in the back woods of Colorado when I was growing up.....got hooked by my mainstream family from back east I was looking at the wall of Asterix and Tintin in the local Barnes and Noble....kinda wanted to buy them all....but would have been about $400!! $11 each!!
    Yeah, I got a couple of the 3 book volumes of Tintin at the B&N near the Park Meadows mall south of Denver.

    There is one close to us in Fort Collins and another opening up soon. I know what gift card I want to Birthday/X-Mas...
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  19. #19
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    B&N has a whole wall of Asterix? Wow, that's amazing, I never knew how popular those were! What about manga at B&N?
    At the canadian equivalent to B&N (Chapters / Indigo) ther eis ussually a pretty good selection of manga, trade paper backs (collections) and graphic novels.

    As always, i will use this opportunity to push a few titles

    Maus
    Eisner - anything on the City and the Building and Dropsie Ave as well as The Plot
    Bob Fingerman - White Like She/Beg the Question
    Cerebus
    Peter Bagge - Hate
    Adrian Tomine - Optic Nerve

    As for the rocket ship TP the Mrs and I were out and came across one from Tin Tin. TP commented on leaving on how cool it was, but not $300 cool.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  20. #20
    Cyburbian chukky's avatar
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    There are papers out there that DONT have C&H in them? Hell, I didn't even know they were repeats.

    Love Asterisk.

    Tintin I used to have to read in French. They say "TanTan".

    There's an Asterisk World there too. I think.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I haven't a clue who Tintin is; but 30 years ago when we first went to Europe, our British guide gave my brother a couple of Asterix books which he still has.

  22. #22

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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    I don't read the newspaper very often, but when I do, one of the first stops is the comics.

    I'm really into the one with the pre-adolescent Black boys....you know....the one that has social and cultural commentary.....I can't remember the name right now.....

    Btw, Wanigas?, that comic you posted appears very esoteric....for me, at least. I'll try to dicepher it later this evening.
    The Boondocks is hilarious-and I'm a suburban bred white boy .


    The latest storyline is wicked-he is housing some distant relatives from New Orleans. A sit com situation, but handled with his acerbic wit. The grandfather told his relatives that he was "going on vacation" expecting them to take a hint and leave. Since they're still in his house, Grandfather and the boys are now shacking up with a neighbor

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    Boondocks...
    Oh, snap!!! This strip in no way exeplifies a comics renaissance.

    Can we get back on track? Let's not talk about our favorite comics, but instead talk about the ways that comics may in fact be experiencing a renaissance in the mainstream.

    I've already identified the appearance of Chris Ware's "Building Stories" in the New York Times sunday magazine, michaelskis has pointed out the popularity of comics character driven Hollywood blockbusters (albeit mostly from the superhero genre), and many have mentioned the explosive shelf space commited to manga and other foreign comics.

    Anything else worth mentioning?

  24. #24
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    Anything else worth mentioning?
    The size and popularity of comic conventions and the fanboy culture associated with some titles leaking over into "normal" pop culture.

    When TP, Geobandito and myself were wandering the streets of Toronto we came across a conventin that celebrated and glorifiedmanga. lots of people dressed as sailor moon and other characters. While the stench of geek was a bit high in that neighbourhood, considering the place they where at there was more money being spent by more than just hardcore fans.

    On another related item, the popularity of collecting figurines has spawned a complete industry (www.magicpony.com) and other specialty retailers are very obvious in TO. I own a few and the workmanship and detail is way different than the star wars toys I had as a kid. Once again the cost of these figures($50+ in most cases) is such that they have to have a broader appeal than just a few geeks. (sorry geeks)
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

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