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Thread: The Generation Xer with an embarassing question about Generation Y culture thread

  1. #26
    Cyburbian dobopoq's avatar
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    GAAAAAAWWWDD DAN! Where have you been!

    I just saw it a couple months ago. Napoleon Dynamite is an irony-drenched nerd anthem classic. Being a reject has never been so cool.
    "The current American way of life is founded not just on motor transportation but on the religion of the motorcar, and the sacrifices that people are prepared to make for this religion stand outside the realm of rational criticism." -Lewis Mumford

  2. #27
    Originally posted by Gedunker
    I'm wondering at what point do people become divorced from current culture. Age, marriage, parenthood, what? I read the names of bands/albums/songs posted by many Cyburbian Whippersnappers here and I have absolutely no clue.
    As someone at the tail end of the baby boomers I have no idea what any of you are talking about. I never saw the movie, and given some of the reviews I probably won't. It appears I am very out of touch with current culture and I too am clueless. The again, ignorance can be bliss.

  3. #28
    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker
    I'm wondering at what point do people become divorced from current culture. Age, marriage, parenthood, what? I read the names of bands/albums/songs posted by many Cyburbian Whippersnappers here and I have absolutely no clue.
    I'm not so sure that I was ever married to it. Having spent most of my formative years in England and being a yank with unusual tastes to begin with, I guess I never clicked (or was exposed to) with current american hipster culture.

    "Where's teh Beef?" LOL
    "And all this terrible change had come about because he had ceased to believe himself and had taken to believing others. " - Leo Tolstoy

  4. #29
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by BeansandCod
    Probably once your age has exceeded the demographic that marketing dorks are appealing to..... or you just wake up one day and realize you have a life - and it's pretty good, thank you very much....

    I dunno - I lost touch with anything after about 1988......
    Amen, brother. Around 1988, I started falling behind the cultural wave. I recall the day even. I was having an afternoon party at my house. My girlfriend had to leave to go pick up her kids. Just about everyone else there was at least ten years younger than me. The Talking Heads had been on the stereo and someone put on some music I had no idea what it was. I realized I had nothing in common with my "friends". I was just the old dude with the good stereo and the rented house.

    1988. It was the best of times. It was the worst of times.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  5. #30
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker
    I'm wondering at what point do people become divorced from current culture. Age, marriage, parenthood, what? I read the names of bands/albums/songs posted by many Cyburbian Whippersnappers here and I have absolutely no clue.
    I think that not loosing touch to what is and is not popular culture is a valuable resource. If you look at corporations and businesses, and even communities that have been able to adapt and change to keep up with the current trends, they trend to be the most successful.
    "The alternate domination of one faction over another, sharpened by the spirit of revenge, natural to party dissension, which in different ages and countries has perpetrated the most horrid enormities, is itself a frightful despotism." - George Washington

  6. #31
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I'm actually more in tune with today's youth culture than I was five years ago. This is due in part to the influence of Mskis. I'll sometimes let him pick the radio station when we're cruising the Mean Streets and I'll force myself to listen at least some of the time to his favorite top 40 station (yes, he cranks up Black Eyed Peas 'Lady Lumps' whenever it comes on because he knows I hate it!).
    In return, he gets to listen to the Oldies station.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  7. #32
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by geobandito
    Y'all are providing an invaluable service here. I'm 38 and it's not until the last few years that I can feel myself really slipping on my pop culture references. Most of the time I don't care and it's a good thing (not knowing the names of The Real World casts anymore is somewhat liberating)
    On a related note, I think The Real World may be a good judge of the point that you start to feel disconnected with popular culture. For me, that would be 1995, when I was 29 years old. I could identify with members of the 1994 San Francisco Real World cast; it felt like they were a part of my generation. The next year was the awful season in London, with cast members that just didn't connect with me. 1996 was Miami, which to me just seemed dominated by drunken hotties and studs with nothing to differentiate them; they really didn't seem like me.

    I also returned to grad school then, and felt so much older than my younger classmates, who were still in their early 20s. I tended to hang out with the architecture students, where the age gap seemed less obvious for some reason.

    Grunge peaked in the early 1990s, with Kurt Cobain killing himself in 1994. It didn't sound that alien to my years, and seemed like a natural progression of the hard rock I grew up with. Most post-grunge rock sounds the same to me, and I have a very difficult time telling the difference between one emo, nu-metal or indie band and another. I can tell the difference between Nirvana and Pearl Jam, but not Limp Bizkit and Korn, or Hawthorne Heights and Dashboard.

    1994: connected to pop culture. 1995: old geezer.

  8. #33
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    I am 24 and I have been divorced and/or disconnected with popular culture probably since...oh... 1996? Somewhere around then... really helped my social life in a very superficial and clicky High School
    I'm not far from you there, especially when it came to music. I stopped caring what other people listened to and started listening to only what I liked. All it did was further contribute to my quirkiness and reputation as the class clown/resident crazy guy. Same thing goes for clothing. I basically said screw this trend s***, I'm a happy fun person and I'm going to dress to match my personality. I became somewhat of a novelty for what wild shirt (often Hawaiian) I would wear on any given day.

    I try hard to stay up on all of the lingo mainly so I know what all of these obnoxious hipsters are talking about.

    EDIT: I'm with you Dan on differentiating Nirvana & Pearl Jam vs. most new bands and I'm only 24

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  9. #34
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman
    I stopped caring what other people listened to and started listening to only what I liked.
    Once I started this, I realized I didn't like half the CD's I own. I bought them because they were popular and what everyone else was listening to, I hang on to them as a sign of the times.

  10. #35
    Quote Originally posted by Gedunker
    I'm wondering at what point do people become divorced from current culture. Age, marriage, parenthood, what? I read the names of bands/albums/songs posted by many Cyburbian Whippersnappers here and I have absolutely no clue.
    Don't worry, 'dunker-I'll pull up a rocking chair for you.
    When did I go from Luke Skywalker to Obi-Wan Kenobi?

  11. #36
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    yes, he cranks up Black Eyed Peas 'Lady Lumps' whenever it comes on because he knows I hate it!
    So basically you mean you have to hear it every twenty minutes, because that's how often they play it.

    Quote Originally posted by Dan
    On a related note, I think The Real World may be a good judge of the point that you start to feel disconnected with popular culture.
    Umm, maybe I shouldn't mention that I still watch this AND Laguna Beach. My husband gives me a very hard time about it, so I lied and told him the kids in LB were in college.

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Tide's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    I'm actually more in tune with today's youth culture than I was five years ago. This is due in part to the influence of Mskis. I'll sometimes let him pick the radio station when we're cruising the Mean Streets and I'll force myself to listen at least some of the time to his favorite top 40 station (yes, he cranks up Black Eyed Peas 'Lady Lumps' whenever it comes on because he knows I hate it!).
    Quote Originally posted by SW MI Planner
    So basically you mean you have to hear it every twenty minutes, because that's how often they play it.
    Just to set the record straight (excuse the pun) the song's title is really "My Humps". And I agree it is horrible, it's probably the worst song from their mostly mediocre second album.

  13. #38
    Cyburbian LorenzoRoyal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by geobandito
    (not knowing the names of The Real World casts anymore is somewhat liberating).
    (Slightly off topic): It doesn't matter what their names are since the casts are so equally dull and interchangeable.

  14. #39
    Suspended Bad Email Address teshadoh's avatar
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    Most of the bands I like now - were existing in the early / mid 90's or were from other bands from that era:
    Ween
    Radiohead
    Queens of the Stone Age
    Flaming Lips

    I pretty much stopped keeping up with popular music in the late 90's, the 'nu metal' & fake 'punk' sounds really started alienating me. As much as people hated Britney Spears, I could at least understand what she was, which is a slutty pop princess similar to Madonna, but Blink 182, Good Charlotte, and all those 'extreme' bands who all appear to be rocking out a lot harder than their actual music, it all completely confuses me. They all have the attitude but their music doesn't do anything for me.

    Which led to my interest in Lucinda Williams, Townes Van Zandt, Jimmie Dale Gilmour, etc. I have since become more interested in new music, in fact it might have actually improved since 2000. But overall I even listen to college music stations & wonder - is this what my parents felt like when I was younger? But it's not that I think the music is too loud, but loud for no reason.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian
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    wow... Napoleon Dynamite.... saw that.. laughed... although it's quite dumb, it's like that... nerdy dumb comedy... don't ask for an European intelectual film....

    Funny... I'm probably more close to US pop culture than Chilean pop culture... Heck.. I don't think many people around here have seen that movie, and many of those who have seen it wouldn't get it... It's just like SNL.. (when it was good and now... for all the tastes) Nobody gets it here...

    Although I wouldn't say that I'm "in" with the US pop culture, as I've never liked pop music like Britnee or any other airheads... but most of the bands I like are from the US

  16. #41
    Cyburbian
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    Who/what is a GwenStefani?

    I occaissionally pick up the local alt news rag, and I hwave to wonder when you needed a degree of some sort to be able to identify various music genres. I.e., what is death metal? Speed metal? Industrial hip-hop? The list goes on...
    "If you love something, let it go."
    What kind of crap is that?

  17. #42
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by greginboise
    Who/what is a GwenStefani?

    I occaissionally pick up the local alt news rag, and I hwave to wonder when you needed a degree of some sort to be able to identify various music genres. I.e., what is death metal? Speed metal? Industrial hip-hop? The list goes on...
    Most of us folks from the 90s remember her as the lead singer to No Doubt, which she still does occasionally while pursuing her solo act. She crosses back and forth a lot between the rock and R&B genres. No Doubt was fairly unique when it came out, but lost some of that when it came out from hiding around 2002-03.

    If you were into the grunge movement in the 90s, then you may also know that she married the lead singer from Pearl Jam, Gavin Rosdale(sp?).

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  18. #43
    Cyburbian Planderella's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Suburb Repairman

    If you were into the grunge movement in the 90s, then you may also know that she married the lead singer from Pearl Jam, Gavin Rosdale(sp?).
    Gavin's band is BUSH, not Pearl Jam.
    "A witty woman is a treasure, a witty beauty is a power!"

  19. #44
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    Wait Till I Turn Up My Hearing Aid.....

    You guyz and galz are so boss.

    First of all.....Gavin Rosdale was in Bush. They had a great CD in the late 90's, which included "Everything's Zen" and "Glycerine", both goode tunes. He was in Toledo about two (2) weeks ago, playing with his new band, at a small clubbe. I figured that if Gwen was on tour with him she would have stopped out to Hub's (in suburban Swanton) to party with this Bear.

    Second of all.....Radiohead's "OK Computer" is on my list of Top Ten Of All Time. But.....it is the only CD from the last fifteen (15) years that makes the list.

    And don't forget.....

    Coupes
    Four-On-The-Floor
    The Curly Shuffle
    "Lotta freaks!"
    Kingbiscuit Flower Hour
    Spiro Agnew
    Electric Avenue
    IBM Junior
    LSMFT

    Vote For Bearo
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  20. #45
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by teshadoh
    But overall I even listen to college music stations & wonder - is this what my parents felt like when I was younger? But it's not that I think the music is too loud, but loud for no reason.
    I was thinking about that on the ride home. I think the difference my pbetween us aging Generation Xers and our Baby Boomer (or, in my case, Silent Generation) parents is that I want to keep up with popular culture, but am frustrated doing so, and introspective about it. The Silent Generation folks that dwelled in my neighborhood, on the other hand, could care less; when popular culture stopped being relevant to them, they froze their tastes, and fell completely out of the loop. They don't express dismay about being our of touch; they just are.

    If I hear an emo band, I might not know the difference between one band and another, like I would have been able to with rock from the 1970s to the mid-1990s, but I know it's emo, and what the genre is about. I know who Btitney Spears and Christine Aguilera are. My parents and neighbors would not have know what new wave or punk were. They seemed completely clueless about even the biggest acts of the day; "Danny, I heard some people at work talk about this band, Iron Zeppelin. Ever hear of it?" "Do you listen to Leopard Skinner?"

    I'm afraid of falling into that camp; the equivalent of the old folks that wondered about those bands their kids listened to like "Arrowshirt" and "Van Heusen." Back in the 1970s and 1980s, when a band was big, it toured and played HUGE venues; places like Rich Stadium and Memorial Auditorium. Every week there was some huge concert. Now when a band is big, the size of that bigness seems much smaller; all but the few largest stars play small venues. Instead of Rush at the Aud, it's Papa Roach at the House of Blues. With the emo and indie genres, it seems like the less popular a band is, the more popular it is; people take pride in being fans of unknown acts rather than big stars. Outside of rap, if you're big, you're a sellout. Go figure.

    BTW, something to think abot: You remember Toni Basil?



    She's 62 years old.

  21. #46
    Cyburbian iamme's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tide
    Just to set the record straight (excuse the pun) the song's title is really "My Humps". And I agree it is horrible, it's probably the worst song from their mostly mediocre second album.
    Just to set the record straight that song's on the 4th album. The first one was really good, the second a little better than mediocre. I don't even want to comment after that.

  22. #47
    Cyburbian chukky's avatar
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    ^^ since only the latest two albums--Elephunk and the new one--have hit pop radio. And it was just for Elephunk the girl joined wasnt it? Whcih took them to a more mainstream sound.

  23. #48
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    I have been disconnected from my generation forever. I have always had more tendencies to favor the culture of Generation X more. Not so much the angst culture, but some of the popular culture. It seemed like you guys had the best of both worlds. You had all the 1980s pop-metal bands, the classic John Hughes movies, the 1990s grunge scene, the good rap of the early 90s, cool action movies like Ghostbusters, the family sitcoms, Ronald Reagan, and pretty cool fashion.

    The only thing I like about my generation is the old Nickelodeon and PBS shows and the Disney movies before 1995, which basically occurred only during my childhood. Once 1997 hit (when I was only 10), all the pop bands, one-hit psuedo-punk-rock, and crap hip hop artists took the scene, movies became giant echoes of their former selves, and television really started to suck.

    I am ashamed in my generation, or rather the crap that their selling us that nobody's buying. I live off nostalgia from the 1980s and early 1990s. Is that bad? Maybe...but I know that it's of greater quality and a lot more fun than the stuff they're spewing out at us today.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  24. #49
    Cyburbian
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    I love current pop culture. Real World, I watch it every week. I like Gwen Stefani (but dislike several of her songs, including the holler back girl song). I own Napoleon Dynamite. Anyone who hasn't seen or thinks this movie sucks needs a kick to the head. With lines like "Do you want a roundhouse kick from the head from a guy wearing pants like these" (the pants are american flag parachute pants) or "Tina, come eat your meat" (Tina is llama). maybe you have to be familiar with rural intermountain living to fully enjoy the comedy.

  25. #50
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan
    I was thinking about that on the ride home. I think the difference my pbetween us aging Generation Xers and our Baby Boomer (or, in my case, Silent Generation) parents is that I want to keep up with popular culture, but am frustrated doing so, and introspective about it. The Silent Generation folks that dwelled in my neighborhood, on the other hand, could care less; when popular culture stopped being relevant to them, they froze their tastes, and fell completely out of the loop. They don't express dismay about being our of touch; they just are.
    I don't think we're a "silent generation"; I think we just realize at some point that we're going to look like complete idiots if we try to keep up. Wouldn't you have been mortified if you were a kid and your parents were trying to act cool and be up on everything you were interested in?

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