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Thread: Lack of state level growth management in Midwest

  1. #1
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    Lack of state level growth management in Midwest

    Are those states not as concerned about preserving open space, farmlands and natural resources?

  2. #2
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    There are so few State acts, I don't know how you can point to just the Midwest as an example.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
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    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by acchhhoooo
    Are those states not as concerned about preserving open space, farmlands and natural resources?
    Well, Illiniois has a great resource in the Forest Preserve Districts, which were enacted in 1913 by state law.

    The Forest Preserve district of Cook County is a great resource. It has saved, reclaimed, and/or maintianed tens of thousands of open space and environmentally important natural corridors here in Chicagoland. Not only does Cook County have ample forest preserves, but DuPage and Lake counties also have wonderful foret preserves.

    Additionally, Metro Cleveland has a wonderfully interconnected metro park system.

    Also, please elaborate about what you mean. Of course they are concerned, but it usually occurs at more localized levels (metro, county, muni., etc.)
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Ha!!!

    Quote Originally posted by acchhhoooo
    Are those states not as concerned about preserving open space, farmlands and natural resources?
    Yeah, it worked so well here in Florida, why not subject those poor midwestern bastards to the same future!! Miami Dade County is holding hearings these next couple of weeks to determine "when" to break the so called growth boundary and allow "limited" development further west.....
    Skilled Adoxographer

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    Cyburbian PlannerByDay's avatar
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    Growth management in Michigan like many other states in the midwest can be difficult because there are so many levels of government ( Towns/Villages/Cities, Townships, County, and Regions) that do their own planning and don't plan regionally. The lack of communication with regards to planning can lead to a City not seeing any growth due to tight restrictive zoning while the adjacent township is going gang busters. Until the two units of government work with eachother growth management will be lacking.

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    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by acchhhoooo
    Are those states not as concerned about preserving open space, farmlands and natural resources?
    You ought to do some research before you level such a claim like, "lack of state level growth management in midwest," especially considering the ban you received for being so difficult in that thread you created about the AICP. Your derisive comments about the midwest are not appreciated.

    There are a handful of Michigan programs that local municipalities can use for the purposes you list:

    Right to Farm Act

    Michigan Farmland Preservation

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    Quote Originally posted by Wanigas?
    You ought to do some research before you level such a claim like, "lack of state level growth management in midwest," especially considering the ban you received for being so difficult in that thread you created about the AICP. Your derisive comments about the midwest are not appreciated.

    There are a handful of Michigan programs that local municipalities can use for the purposes you list:

    Right to Farm Act

    Michigan Farmland Preservation

    Thank you for your response. Michigan was the only state I found with a state growth management act. So what part of "lack of state level growth management in midwest" is innaccurate. If you are offended by the question, enough to use a threatening tone, maybe you shouldn't read the post. Question still stands, the midwest still is a pristine rural environment with a huge farming community, maybe more so than in any other region. THAT is the reason why I pose the question, if it wasn't obvious.

    Quote Originally posted by The One
    Yeah, it worked so well here in Florida, why not subject those poor midwestern bastards to the same future!! Miami Dade County is holding hearings these next couple of weeks to determine "when" to break the so called growth boundary and allow "limited" development further west.....

    I like hearing about Florida's gma, it has defintely effected the development pattern in that state. Whether or not the state chooses to uphold previous decisions is the reality of the process, but having that process is good...right?
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 23 Nov 2005 at 3:20 PM.

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    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by acchhhoooo
    Thank you for your response. Michigan was the only state I found with a state growth management act. So what part of "lack of state level growth management in midwest" is innaccurate.
    Logically, if it exists then there's not a lack.


    the midwest still is a pristine rural environment with a huge farming community, maybe more so than in any other region. THAT is the reason why I pose the question, if it wasn't obvious.
    Have you ever actually been to the midwest? You think it's called "the rustbelt" because of rusty farm equipment?

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    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    Logically, if it exists then there's not a lack.




    Have you ever actually been to the midwest? You think it's called "the rustbelt" because of rusty farm equipment?

    I know the population vs land area vs rural vs built environment and after looking at that, the area is basically open space compared to other areas in the U.S. I'm not denying the existence of cities and previouse industrial development in the midwest. The area is not L.A. or Atlanta so it seems like the perfect opportunity to ward off these types of developments before they occur. I hear a lot about mixed use developments, cluster developments, things of that nature on this website. Why are those things important? The smaller communities, they are not going up but out. Does this sprawl have to become a huge problem before it is addressed or should it be addressed prior to it becoming a problem? NOW is the perfect time to logically start addressing those issues on a regional (statewide) scale before it is a major problem. Maybe growth is not an issue in the midwest because its pro development or maybe no substantial development is occurring because of no substantial population growth in the region. Maybe local planning agencies cannot financially handle meeting state mandated development requirements. WHY, WHY why is the question. AND THANK YOU FOR YOUR RESPONSE JORDANB.

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    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Observe a map of states with State Level acts:



    The question should be why are there just 11 states with an act. Why ask about the Midwest? Looks like plenty of other resource rich areas "don't care either.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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    your map is inaccurate, if you don't wanna keep to the topic at hand, please don't post or a moderator (giff) will shut my thread down.

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    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by acchhhoooo
    your map is inaccurate, if you don't wanna keep to the topic at hand, please don't post or a moderator (giff) will shut my thread down.
    The map was a result of a quick web search. The information was from the Sierra Club. What other States have State Level Growth management? Your post was on State Level Growth Management, the map deals with the topic.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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    Cyburbian
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    I think that most state legislatures lack the cajones to adopt state wide growth management plans, particularly states that have a lot of non urban land areas (like the midwest and intermountain west) and also have a strong attitude towards private property rights. Also, a lot of local governements do not like having anything mandated from the state or the federal govt. even if the mandate will have positive impacts and results, particularly over long periods of time.

    Local goverments make sprawl the problem that it is by having large lot sizes and not allowing for innovative land planning. The use of TDR's, clustering, form based zoning, etc all result in less land consumption. The sprawling of cities is a continual and inevitable output of growth and has been a problem forever. With proper planning and development guidlines, the negative impact of growth can be mitigated. It is unfortunate that not every level of govt. sees this.

    I think ecological and sustainable planning will increase in popularity in the near future so hopefully regular joes will embrace those concepts better and maybe some momentum towards state wide preservation programs will result in more states adopting growth management practices that have teeth.

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    Quote Originally posted by giff57
    The map was a result of a quick web search. The information was from the Sierra Club. What other States have State Level Growth management? Your post was on State Level Growth Management, the map deals with the topic.

    your incorrect map does show the lack of state level growth managment in the mid west compared to other regions of the country BUT that is not the ISSUE. The issue is WHY THAT IS THE CASE. Based upon your response or nonresponse in this instance, maybe the answer simply is, the preservation of open space, farmlands and natural resources is not a high priority in these areas due to their vastness. THANKS for your response giff. Maybe some fellow cyburnuts can help you find the missing state.

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    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by acchhhoooo
    The issue is WHY THAT IS THE CASE. Based upon your response or nonresponse in this instance, maybe the answer simply is, the preservation of open space, farmlands and natural resources is not a high priority in these areas due to their vastness. THANKS for your response giff. Maybe some fellow cyburnuts can help you find the missing state.
    I know that our Island state is missing. I have since found that there are 13 now. Looks to me like the West/Southwest has a bigger issue. Those places actually have a growth problem. Iowa has bantererd the issue about, but with really only a couple of areas with much growth, the legislature hasn't seen the need to enact anything. Surprisingly enough, Planners played a role in the defeat of the bill. Planners (particularly the Iowa APA) didn't think the bill went far enough. A few of us would have liked to get a bill on the books and then tweaked it. Who knows what the correct way is. The Farm Bureau also has a problem with rural zoning. They want to protect farmland, but want to permit farmer Bob to develop his land when he is ready to retire.

    In short there is no simple answer.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  16. #16
    Cyburbian
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    The bigger question for debate ought to be is whether, in fact, the top down, state mandated, growth management approach is an appropriate approach. Some of us prefer philosophically home rule. Further, I think the jury is still out on whether state mandated growth tools are more effective than alternatives. Florida is a great example. We have plenty of very smart planners in Cyburbia who have raised some doubts about tools such as concurrancy, etc...

    Based upon your response or nonresponse in this instance, maybe the answer simply is, the preservation of open space, farmlands and natural resources is not a high priority in these areas due to their vastness
    My point, in part, is that preservation of open space and state mandated programs do not have to be co-dependent.

    as an aside, i would propose ask you acchoo to provide more of a setup in your thread posts. It would help all of us, I think.

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