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Thread: Hope VI

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Planner Hottie's avatar
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    Hope VI

    Is there a discussion somewhere here about other cities' experiences with HUD and Hope VI projects?

    ALL of this city's public housing has been declared non-conforming by the Feds (meaning that costs of rehabbing the units would be too high - the method used for determining these costs is also problemmatic) and we now have to rebuild all of them in the Hope VI model.

    Well many of us have come to the realization that the Hope VI model does not best serve the lowest income residents in our community. These people are effectively edged out of the last option that was available to them, due to stricter rules that are designed to make the "mixed income" scenario work.

    Ironically (or not), these sites also happen to be prime real estate now that people are moving back downtown. The market rate component of the model does not need that much coercing to buy into these developments.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian iamme's avatar
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    The reduction of subsidised housing is the biggest of this program. However, the increase in quality of the new subsidised housing is great. I'm not just talking about the units' structural quality but the fact that there isn't the concentration of poverty that there was before.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Planner Hottie's avatar
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    The Hope VI projects that are underway here are beautiful developments, using highest quality materials and promoting the tenets of New Urbanism. They are energy efficient, spacious and nicely landscaped. Everyone wants to live there. Unfortunately, not everyone can - not if you have a record, bad employment history (even if there is disability) and there's even one that won't take you if you have any debt. The new developments have next to zero former resident return rate. They admit that it's very hard to get back in. And HUD is cutting funding for case management.

    --------

    Can I assume by the lack of replies that everyone else has had positive experiences with Hope VI? I should say that our experience is still relatively new, and I am still hopeful that things will shape up in the future.

    It (demo-ing all the old public housing) also seems to have had the effect of turning almost all existing neighborhoods against infill development. In the historically lower income areas, they all assume that these will be used for Section 8 housing.
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 14 Dec 2005 at 5:13 PM. Reason: double reply

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    hope VI

    Theses nice looking developments(projects) are all well and good. The fact is that they are designed so only 5%-15% of the original tenants actually reside in the new housing and many of them may leave after subsidies are used up. So what happens to the tenants that used to live in the original public housing projects? Some areas have argued that the tenant relocations have actually de-stabilized other areas of the community. I guess Chicago Cabrini Green could be a example. I am sure these type of projects create great photo ops but does it really solve the problem of the greater picture? Sounds like state sponsered gentrification anyway.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by nemo31
    what happens to the tenants that used to live in the original public housing projects? Some areas have argued that the tenant relocations have actually de-stabilized other areas of the community. I guess Chicago Cabrini Green could be a example. I am sure these type of projects create great photo ops but does it really solve the problem of the greater picture? Sounds like state sponsered gentrification anyway.
    HOPE VI, when operating in tandem with Section 8 vouchers, succeeds in increasing the mobility of low-income residents, reducing concentrations of poverty that would otherwise beget a culture of low expectations, and maximizes locational choice among the poor, opening doors that were otherwise closed by bureaucratic inertia and apathy.

    Certainly, HOPE VI is not a cure all. But the program theoretically allows the returning low-income residents to enjoy higher quality living spaces and the non-returning low-income residents to break free of their complacency and, with the help of Section 8 vouchers, locate in more stable, amenity-rich neighborhoods with better schools, better transportation, proximity to job centers, effective policing, and functional social networks. This chapter in US housing policy could potentially help public housing residents to feel more like human beings then case numbers, more like members of society instead of social outcasts.

    Of course, there is a considerable dearth of data to study where the displaced residents are going, what most explains their locational decisions and whether or not their displacement has catalyzed instability in other neighborhoods. More research is desperately needed.

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