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Thread: Growth corridors

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
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    Growth corridors

    Hi,
    I have started working on this project titled the 'Growth Corridor' to be proposed along an intra city highway circling the city ( 8-Lane and Access Control, 162 kms long, 2 kms wide- 1 km on either side, Urban Area population around 6 million, 50% of this proposed road stretch goes through open land but with high urbanisation potential ).

    I am looking for similar works, case studies across the globe.

    I am at the beginning of a very short project period so this is the only time I can really do some searching. Once the work starts then it will be just drawing up the plans and regulations.
    Its a very tight project deadline.

    I am thinking of proposing a single zone (but multipurpose/mixed use)
    Would like to concentrate more on regulations based on specific use request-plot size-road width-setbacks. Less of control more of regulation.
    Encouraging large sized projects which would help infrastructure development apart from providing housing, employment and recreation.


    Looking for inputs from anyone

    Thanks
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

  2. #2
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    Oh my. Uhm. Growth corridors come up fairly often but the scale of what you are tackling is rather large. And it would seem to be a concentric ring, which, really, isn't THAT different from a corridor in its function, so that's alright.

    The amount of potential land for urbanization ringing a 162km roadway is just incredible. Hundreds of square kilometres if not more. I'm afraid I don't know anything of that scale that could aid you.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian natski's avatar
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    In Sydney, a ring road, connecting all major motorways has been completed. By completing this, our state government is using this corridor to establish a global economic corridor throughout the city.

    There are to be employment hubs and economic activites located along this corridor- well some are already established, but this new road, will provide increased opportunities for the corridor.

    Its all apart of the Sydney Metropolitan Strategy, a google search should give you some info!
    "Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?" Zoolander

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
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    Growth Corridors?

    Quote Originally posted by natski
    In Sydney, a ring road, connecting all major motorways has been completed. By completing this, our state government is using this corridor to establish a global economic corridor throughout the city.

    There are to be employment hubs and economic activites located along this corridor- well some are already established, but this new road, will provide increased opportunities for the corridor.

    Its all apart of the Sydney Metropolitan Strategy, a google search should give you some info!
    Thanks Natski. This sounds similar. I'll do a search. The plan is to link this corridor to the main core city with radially outward roads and then finally come up with a larger metropolitan area plan.

    Thanks abrowne! Yes you are right its just not a corridor but then what do we call it. Its one of a kind case till now.
    The term has been fixed as a corridor because it runs along the ring road. The land proposed to be under special regulation is more than 300 sq kms and this plan might add millions more in populationin the next decade or more.
    Population and urbanisation of this scale is something we have to to tackle in our country.

    It might sound too big therefore its more important to come up with simple but effective regulations macro level plan with enough and efficient circulation so that the character along the highway looks planned and proper.

    The urban area already has three Development Plans in force.
    Therefore this projectised approach is very good for fast development but has to be integrated into the overall development plan network of the city-region.

    It would be difficult to get into specific 'Use' related issues right now.
    The conceptual framework needs to be robust and in line with the overall economic policy of the city/state.

    Real estate is another major factor about which I might discuss later. Its something internal and local so that will probably be taken care of by discusiing with various stakeholders (the whole range of consultations)

    I will be looking for more comments

    Thanks
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

  5. #5
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    I'm curious as to how much of this is centrally planned - does the state have the power to set expected densities and layout and the like? Can the state, alongside the highway, construct rail transit routes? How much of this is left to develop on its own?

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    Look for information on a plan proposed for the Washington DC metro area in the late 1960s, the Wedges & Corridors plan produced by the Maryland-National-Capitol Park & Planning Commission. (MNCPPC).

    Much of the development in Montgomery County Maryland has followed the guidance of this plan. Development Corridor along a corridor containing MD-355 (6 lane rd) and Interstate I-270 (twelve lanes, limited access), and a subway line. There is increased development allowed at nodes, near subway stations, and in specific communities further out than the subway goes. This may be larger in scale than your project.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by abrowne
    I'm curious as to how much of this is centrally planned - does the state have the power to set expected densities and layout and the like? Can the state, alongside the highway, construct rail transit routes? How much of this is left to develop on its own?
    The highway right of way is acquired for 'public purpose'.

    Most of the land falls within the legal jurisdiction of the existing Urban Development Authority(UDA), thus making the regulations enforceable through this UDA.

    All proposals are worked out by the UDA, which then passes it on to the government which approves it and sends it back for enforcement.

    The State enacts a legislation or a special government order to notify the intent of the project and the land extent to be affected and also the plan itself.

    The Development Act specifies the procedure and there are provisions for public objections and suggestions.

    The UDA takes the help of the state government to keep some of the govt. lands for developing projects on its own or through PPP (Public Private Partnerships)/JVs.
    Rest of the lands/projects are undertaken by the private sector on their own. (around 60-70% of the share for development)
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

  8. #8
    Cyburbian abrowne's avatar
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    So is it likely, then, that the highway will be the only major mode of transportation or will Public-Private Partnerships (P3s as we call them) fill in the gap with rail and whatnot? Transportation capacity would be my chief worry in an area this large.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by abrowne
    So is it likely, then, that the highway will be the only major mode of transportation or will Public-Private Partnerships (P3s as we call them) fill in the gap with rail and whatnot? Transportation capacity would be my chief worry in an area this large.
    The intra city highway (as I call it, the government calls it the ring road) is a 8 lane divided carriageway with separate ROW for rail link.
    This rail link will be connected to the proposed North South and East West MRTS corridors

    This ring road will be connected by 29 or so radially outwards high capacity roads(without any rail link). The transportation policy is still road centric although we are now moving towards rail based(MRTS). India is one of the fastest growing 2 wheeler and 4 wheeler markets in the world.

    So the transportation capacity is supposedly taken care.

    The envisaged models for development are:

    1.The Ring Road would either be built by the UDA or given to a private company on BOT or BOOT basis. This will be decided sometime soon. A part of the highway also connects the IT precinct of the city to th upcoming International Airport.

    2. The 29 or so radial roads emanating from the centre of the city and touching the ring road is being taken up as a separate project by the UDA by own funds, state funds as well as central(federal funds) under a special federal scheme.

    2. The land development within affected zone(under the new regulations) will be developed exlcusively by the UDA/State in some cases and in some cases by a JV with a private company. THE UDA/State retain the upper hand this way or around 30% of the land development.

    3. Only in lands already owned by the private sector would incentives be given for the private sector to develop large projects ( integrated townships, IT parks, commercial nodes, residential areas, recreational areas). This kind of development would constitute atleast 60-70% of the total development.

    4. The macro infrastructure will be providede majorly by the UDA/State thorugh abovementioned options/styles and a large part of micro level infrastructure would be provided by the private sector( which falls within the large projects they would do)
    Large projects by he private sector would mean provision of basic physical as well as social infrastructure thus reducing the burden on the government. For encouraging the private sector in doing this incentives are being looked into.


    Right now I am trying to see similar cases around the world and in anycase develop a land use plan, circulation plan and regulations report backed by a strong concept( forward looking)
    The next stage would be getting into the details

    Thanks abrowne. I wish others can chip in too.

    I am looking for more inputs from cyburbia.
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

  10. #10
         
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    Of course its not a direct fit, but Copenhagen's "Finger Plan" of the '60s and '70s built up around narrow bands along commuter rail and freeway corridors. Basically, the existing city center formed the palm of the hand, and five "fingers" extended outward along the rail lines.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
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    thanks abrowne skyfire and chrisg

    I am noting down everything and looking for more.

    Probably would want to start a thread on planning regulations in the Land Use, Zoning and Development Control section in some time.
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

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