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Thread: Dual MBA/planning degrees

  1. #1
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    Dual MBA/planning degrees

    I am currently waiting to hear from several different schools regarding applications for dual degree programs in business and planning. I have been working for several years at a small architecture/RE development firm in DC and would like to work as a project manager or for some quasi-governmental development/planning agency after grad school.

    Is the dual degree a good choice? I have also contemplated getting a MS Real Estate, but I feel that the scope of study in those programs might be a little too restrictive.

    What are everyone's impressions of these dual programs? Are there certain professions that these degrees gear one towards/pigeon-hole one into?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Mr. Shem
    I am currently waiting to hear from several different schools regarding applications for dual degree programs in business and planning. I have been working for several years at a small architecture/RE development firm in DC and would like to work as a project manager or for some quasi-governmental development/planning agency after grad school.

    Is the dual degree a good choice? I have also contemplated getting a MS Real Estate, but I feel that the scope of study in those programs might be a little too restrictive.

    What are everyone's impressions of these dual programs? Are there certain professions that these degrees gear one towards/pigeon-hole one into?
    I don't think the skill sets from each discipline are compatible. At least in the public sector I think a MPA (Public Admin.) would be more valuable. Even in real estate development/consulting I think a background in real estate, law, or public admin. in addition to a planning degree would be more valuable than an MBA. If you'd like to run a non-profit I would get a degree in non-profit management.

  3. #3
    Don't get a half MBA. You're not going to learn anything useful and you won't be able to compete against the hordes of people with full MBAs. Get some real, specialized skills, like a Masters in Urbanism or a Masters in Real Estate.

    What skills they'll teach you in a MBA program you can learn from the internet.
    In articles published in Business 2.0, National Post, the Chicago Sun-Times, and the Chronicle of Higher Education, Stanford Business School Professor Jeffrey Pfeffer stated that you may be just as successful in your career if you do a two or three week boot camp on business basics instead of a two-year MBA.

    Professor Pfeffer analyzed 40 years of research on the economic value of an MBA degree. He concluded that it does not guarantee a successful career or a higher salary. His research was published in the Fall 2002 issue of the Academy of Management Learning and Education
    http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north347.html

  4. #4
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Personally, I feel MBAs are overrated. I don't see it doing you a whole lot of good in the planning field. An MPA/MURP dual degree is far more useful and provides you with the personnel/budgeting background to go private sector without any trouble later on.

    That is just my opinion though.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  5. #5
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    I agree with the others. My fiancee works in HR and she refers to MBA's as "a dime a dozen". EVERYONE has an MBA.
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  6. #6
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    Why not, if you like both programs

    I considered the same option when I was applying to schools, but in the end the business schools that I got into didn't have the best planning programs. If you have the option to go to a business program that matches what you want from an MBA, and you like the planning program as well, then why not. On the other hand, I got into a very well-regarded MBA program, but not at the school where I wanted to go for the planning degree, and decided to pass on the MBA. Subsequently, I've heard from various real estate folks that having an MBA is only added value if you want to go into the investment side (ie rather than the development side), and in fact, employers may think twice if they see an "MBA" on your resume because it means "more expensive".

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