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Thread: Real Old School Road Trips?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Real Old School Road Trips?

    Are real road trips dieing? People will work hard to get from point A to point B as quickly as possible, and miss so much great stuff along the way.

    In the recent movie Elizabethtown, the main character goes on a road trip with the ashes of his recently deceased father. The trip was coordinated and guided by CD, by the main characters love interest.

    Along the trip he stops at the place that Martin Luther King Jr. was shot, the survivor tree in Oklahoma City, has a bowl of chili, has a beer at an old blues bar while hearing stories from the owner, and finishes his trip at the second largest farmers market in the world. So much history has been created in the small towns of America, and the world for that matter. But we often limit our selves to the big cities that is passed up by people on the interstate or in the plane.

    When was the last time that you went on a real old school road trip? What did you stop and see?



    Additionally, I would like to propose the Cyburbia road trip guide. What is there in your community, or surrounding community, that people should stop and see on their way to the next destination?

    We can then use Google Earth to map these out, connect the dots, and we have a road trip planner!
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  2. #2
    maudit anglais
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    Additionally, I would like to propose the Cyburbia road trip guide. What is there in your community, or surrounding community, that people should stop and see on their way to the next destination?

    We can then use Google Earth to map these out, connect the dots, and we have a road trip planner!
    Hmm...cool idea, I might even end up using such a guide this summer...feel then need to get out and see some stuff.

    My last "real" road trip - did some railfanning with a buddy back in the fall of 2000. Went from Toronto to just north of NYC via the CSX mainline, then followed the "southern tier" back up to Buffalo. Made a couple of side trips to see the northeast corridor, and "state line" tunnels on the MA/NY border.

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I think one of the most important litmus tests for evaluating the greatness of a road trip is how many good anecdotes emerge.... "Dude, remember that time when we were going to Ft. Lauderdale and stopped that night in a podunk town in Tennessee and you ended up porking the Sheriff's wife and when that Deputy busted the door down you held that bottle of Jack Daniels up and said....."

    Last great Road Trip for me was when me and two other friends went to Jacksonville, FL. We had memorable stops in Savannah, Valdosta, 'South of the Border', Wilmington, and Wash DC
    Last edited by Maister; 28 Feb 2006 at 10:24 AM.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  4. #4
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Marquette Michigan Road Trip Stage...

    If you happen to be driving along the north shore and you drift into the City of Marquette, follow Front Street into the historic downtown, past the Landmark Inn and the Peter White Library and up to the Worlds Largest Wooden Dome. The Superior Dome (1401 Presque Isle north of Fair, Marquette MI 49855) was created as a joint effort between NMU and the USOEC as a training facility. Operated by NMU, it stands 14 stories high, contains 781 Douglass Fir Beams, and can house over 16,000 for events ranging from graduation, car shows, and NMU football on a sold piece of artificial turf known as the Magic Carpet. The name comes from its ability to levitate just above the surface of the floor (with the help of small air jet holes in the floor), when being rolled up to expose a rubberized track.

    While your there, stand in the center of the dome look up, and clap your hands. If the dome is vacant, you will hear your hands a total of as many 8 times as the sound echo’s off the many surfaces and angles

    After your visit do the dome go across the street and stop into Jean Kays Pasties for lunch. (1635 Presque Isle Ave. Marquette, MI 49855) The business has been family owned since it’s creation in 1975 and is now owned and operated by the founders son Brian, and still sues the exact same recipes as they did 30 years ago. But the recipe it’s self has not changed since Brian’s Ancestors, a group of Finnish Minors in Iron Mountain would make these before work so they would have a hearty lunch at the bottom of the shaft.

    Continue on your journey and follow Presque Isle avenue to Wright Street take a right, to lake view, and take a left onto Lake View. This will bring you to Presque Isle Park. This scenic beauty on the shore of Lake Superior offer spectacular views of both the lake and the City of Marquette, and the parks design was guided by a letter written to local civic leader Peter White from Fredric Law Olmsted. While undeveloped, it has been home to residents for the past several thousand years as the Native American’s had a village on the island. If you follow the driving path around the island drive slow and watch for wild life. About two/thirds of the way around watch on your right for a second drive. Pull in, get out of the car, and follow the walking path out to “Black Rocks” as called by the locals. This rock out cropping is some of the oldest exposed rock in the world and is a sharp contrast from the native Marquette Sandstone that surrounds the out cropping and as allowed for steep cliffs to be formed. Many of the locals will use black rocks for rock jumping, or cliff diving into the cove. Be warned that the water is very cold, and this is not recommended in months other than August or September.

    On your way out of town follow third street south. You will pass back past the dome and into the college business district known as the “Village”. Pass through downtown and Washington Street up to the Marquette County Court House. (400 South Third Street, Marquette MI 49855) This 100 year old court house is made out of the Native Marquette Sandstone, Indiana Lime Stone, and granite and was home to a landmark court case dealing with the insanity of a jealous lover. The story was popularized by the Jimmy Stewart Movie Anatomy of a Murder, which was filled in the community and in the Historic Court House. President Theodore Roosevelt also awarded a six cent settlement in a libel suit against Ishpeming newspaper publisher George Newett.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  5. #5
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    ..and the road trips that you take with your kiddos are a blast on the backroads too. We took our, at that time 4 and nearly 2 year old on a short road trip on the state and US highways through south east, south central, and south west Wisconsin. Frequently, we ended up on county roads looping back upon ourselves etc. We can refelct upon the trip by talking of the wonderful fall colors on the hills around the Dells, Whitewater, Ft. Atkinson, and most notably in SW Wisconsin around Mineral Point. We often talk about how our short weekend road trip ended up with us staying at 3 different hotels in three different cities only seperated by 30-40 miles. The Dells, Madison, and Janesville, WI. We ordered in pizza, swam in various hotel pools, and the kids vividly remember details of the vacation.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    The road trip is certainly not dead. We take one every year, even if it is only a few days. My last great roadie was to the Fiesta Bowl in 2005. We spent new years in Vegas, alomst got arrested at Hoover Dam (I didn't know that hanging out of a car window taking pictures was illegal) ate at a small hole in the wall in the middle of Arizona, crashed a private party at Tallesin West on New Years Day, attempted to dock the space shuttle with the International Space Station at the Science Museum in Phoenix, and watched the Utes cap off a perfect season. The drive home included a complete 720 on a snow pack road (no injuries or damage to our or any other vehicles), a dip in Lake Powell (very cold in january), and lunch in Kanab.

    Other recent road trips: UT to Lake Tahoe, San Fran, Napa/Sonoma, and Yosemite. This was good because we didn't make any reservations, just kind of drove around until we found a cool place to stop.

    Jackson Hole, Red Lodge, Bozeman. This was a fun trip. We visited a lot of American West historical sites. Spending 3-4 days skiing from the road in the Beartooths. A great trip.

    I-40 through Colorado. This was fun too. Staying at Steamboat during the Cowboy skiing event. A lot of fun, and crazy.

    The biggest roadie was when I was 19, 3 friends and I travelled from UT t hrough Baja Mexico and up the California Coast to San Fran and then back home. We worked construction all summer (saving everything) and then left the end of August and returned the day before school started the end of September. What a blast. Most nights were spent sleeping on the side of road (with the exception of 5 days spend with dad in SD). We surfed just about every day, showered in the sinks at McDonalds, caught a Greatful dead concert in San Diego, admired the massive waves at the mavericks (no, we didn't attempt to get in the water). I wish we wold have had the foresight to record the trip, because it certainly would have made for an incredible documentary. Same grupd of frineds that went to the Fiesta Bowl. We are all married w/ kids now, but vow to keep doing roadies.
    Last edited by cololi; 28 Feb 2006 at 4:38 PM.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    Our last road trip was a lighthouse tour around Lake Michigan. That is when we found out 4th of July is not a good day to be in Michigan without hotel reservations

  8. #8
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I was a big fan of road trips. My friends and I used to criss-cross the country looking for new rivers to float. Good times and great adventures (and some not so good). Since marrying, though, the adventure has lost its thrill. I have to do all the driving, which is hard on my hip. The boy is restless. My wife considers a trip a waste of time if the destination isn't a city and the goal isn't shopping. I just can't get her to appreciate the charms of Custer, Idaho or Pony, MT, or any other crumbling ghost or near-ghost town, or natural wonder.

    As for my friends, they too no longer do road trips. One is dead (so doesn't travel). One is settled down and, like me, has a family that doesn't appreciate rambling. Lost touch with another, since he was the former brother-in-law of the dead one. Lost one due to the war in Iraq (he didn't go; we just haven't spoken since Bush invaded).

    My last road trip was seven years ago, when I interviewed for a planning job in Souix City. Two of my buds lived in Missouri, so we met up at the Harry Truman State Park and partied like it was 1999, which it was. The last time I saw one of them. He died a year ago.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    Well we always do road trips with my family for vacations, but there's still lots of things we're missing.

    Well, my dots to the Cyburbian road trip would be way out of route, but may guide people that want to come here. So that's a pretty good idea!

  10. #10
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    Try buying a house 350 miles away, I've done several road trips in the last couple of months.
    “As soon as public service ceases to be the chief business of the citizens, and they would rather serve with their money than with their persons, the State is not far from its fall”
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

  11. #11
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    I enjoy road trips. Even though I'm a person who likes to plan and be organised, I like it when I have a few days open to do whatever I/we feel like before we need to be at the final destination. I actually just did a couple of road trips in Oz although they were short and we didn't spend enough time exploring away from the main tourist traps. Stopped in to say hi to Rem and family after leaving Sydney

    I was thinking, while my boyfriend was driving and demanding I alert him to any potential items of interest otherwise he wouldn't stop driving , how so many tourists just drive through the main streets and see the main attractions, but that the fun, memorable stuff often happens when you venture off the beaten track.... I have a lot of good road trip memories.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Plus
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    Road trip history -
    back in '67 family drove cross country from NJ to California and back.
    college - drove straight through from NJ to Utah on I-80, made the round trip for 3 yrs.
    recent yrs
    - drove from Southern IN to Jersey Shore, have tried 4 different routes.
    - Natchez Trace Parkway, very worth the effort.
    Oddball
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    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
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    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
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  13. #13
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    My longest road trip was from Detroit to the Columbian Ice fields on the Alberta/British Columbia Border. Along the way we stopped at Teddy Roosevelt NP, Glacier NP, Waterton NP, Banff NP, Jasper NP, Lake Louise NP. On the way back it was Kaotanay (SP) NP, Crater's of the Moon NM, Yellowstone NP, Grand Teton NP, Jackson Hole Wyoming, Beartooth Pass, da Kewenaw (pre NP days), with a drive on Brockway Mountain Drive, a Stop at the Fort, then campin in Christmas (pre-casino).

    Took about two weeks.

    My craziest was in Ireland, no one wanted to drive cuz it would freak you out (right hand drive).
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  14. #14
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Now we need other people to fill list a few things that people should see in your community! Please list a short description of the place, (link if possible) and the address. I will start working with a few others to get these mapped out and have the information attached to each location.

    Every community has something that people should see. Some ideas is a bridge over a river, a building that has survived a city wide fire, a bar that has unique characteristics or people. One example would be in downtown York PA where the Articles of Confederation were signed, or a place that started a world famous product or food. Or even some location that has such a phenomenal since of place that you know about and that you are willing to share with us. An example of such a place is the rest stop on US-41 in the Upper Peninsula just north of Trenery. The water that comes from the old school pump is so pure and clean that it is not uncommon to see people filling massive containers for wine, beer, or just to drink. Apparently the pump is deep enough to hit an aquifer that is connected to shelves at the bottom of Lake Superior.

    See the Marquette Road Trip info as an example.
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    My longest road trip was from Detroit to the Columbian Ice fields on the Alberta/British Columbia Border. Along the way we stopped at Teddy Roosevelt NP, Glacier NP, Waterton NP, Banff NP, Jasper NP, Lake Louise NP. On the way back it was Kaotanay (SP) NP, Crater's of the Moon NM, Yellowstone NP, Grand Teton NP, Jackson Hole Wyoming, Beartooth Pass, da Kewenaw (pre NP days), with a drive on Brockway Mountain Drive, a Stop at the Fort, then campin in Christmas (pre-casino).

    Took about two weeks.

    My craziest was in Ireland, no one wanted to drive cuz it would freak you out (right hand drive).
    I made the EXACT same trip as you, in the '80s. I was just about to post about it. I made the same stops on the way there, but none of the ones you mention on the way back.

    Next summer my family reunion will be in Los Angeles, and we've already said we're taking the Route 66 way from Chicago to LA. We hope to squeeze in side trips to the Ozarks and the Grand Canyon on the way there. Coming back, we'll go through Vegas, Utah, Denver, Omaha and Des Moines.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Anyone got any good places in the of middle of nowhere (I mean Wyoming ) to drive through?

    Looks like Z Man is high-tailing it up north to Jackson Hole in a couple weeks.
    Wonder what there is to do there....
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  17. #17
    We stopped to see the Grateful God D*mned Dead!

  18. #18
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
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    This Bear will certainly second michaelskis Marquette road trip post. Let me add a few more Upper Peninsula gems.....

    Republic, Michigamme, And Moose.....West of Marquette you can hit the little dying town of Republic. Still has a couple taverns but the town is nothing like it used to be.....before the huge iron ore mine closed about fifteen (15) years ago.

    Michigamme is another old mining town, built on the side of a hill. You have to get off US 41 (turn south) to see the interesting part of this burg.

    North of Lake Michigamme you can wander up bumpy Peshekee Grade Road (I think that is the correct name) and look for moose. Go near dusk.

    Munising To Whitefish Point.....From Munising, MI, follow H-58 along the southern boundary area of the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. Wherever possible, take the side jaunts into the lakeshore area. Eventually you will work your way to Grand Marais, MI. There is a mini-brewhouse here!

    Follow H-58 along the rugged Lake Superior shore. Camp in incredible lakeside campgrounds such as Lake Superior Campground. When you get to 407, follow it to 410 and turn east. Follow 410, 412, and 414 to 500. Take a side jaunt on 412 (you may need 4WD for this if it has been raining) to the Crisp Point Lighthouse, considered the "most endangered" lighthouse in the states. (Watch out for a naked Bear who has been known to be in that vicinity. )

    Follow 500 down to M123 and hang a left. Proceed to Paradise and enjoy the taverns. North of town is the famous Great Lakes Shipwrecks Museum.

    Not In The Yoopee: The Irish Hills.....A great road trip is to grab a Michigan county map book and wander around all of the lakes and hills of the region in the southeastern part of the state known as The Irish Hills. As always, I can tell you where a good bar is.....smack dab between Devils Lake and Round Lake, on a spit of land only about a block wide.
    _____

    Side-bar maintenance mechanic note: On H-58, many years ago, this Bear and his ex were cruising along in a yellow CJ-5 Jeep. The linkage that operates the acelerator fell apart. I had to break a tree limb and bend a piece of green branch into the holes of the broken linkage parts. It worked and it enabled us to cruise into Grand Marais and find a real screw.

    Bear
    Occupy Cyburbia!

  19. #19
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    Anyone got any good places in the of middle of nowhere (I mean Wyoming ) to drive through?

    Looks like Z Man is high-tailing it up north to Jackson Hole in a couple weeks.
    Wonder what there is to do there....
    Not from the CO direction. I am taking it you are taking I-80 to Rock Springs and then whatever road heads north out of there? If you go all the way to Evanston and head up US 89, I've got a whole list. Otherwise, here is my list of must do's in jackson:

    Ski Jackson Hole and ride the tram. It is being yanked out this year. If you get fresh snow, the Hobacks are some of the longest, thigh burning powder runs you will ever take. Also, at the very least, look into Corbets Couloir, ski it if you can.

    Get a chocolate cream cheese muffin from the Bunery near the town square. Eat breakfast there too.

    Try to order a beer from a bar stool at the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar. Feel pissed off at how the bar tenders treat you.

    Take a sleigh ride through the elk refuge. Pretty cool.

    Ice skate on Flat Creek.

    That is just for starters. Let me know if you want more. I also think that there was someone on the cyburbia who was a planner from Teton Co that could probably give you some better, more local things to do.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Bear Up North
    Michigamme is another old mining town, built on the side of a hill. You have to get off US 41 (turn south) to see the interesting part of this burg.

    Bear
    Interesting... Any similarities with Sewell, the Copper mining town built on a slope (of a mountain though)? Here's the thread I did about it.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    ...........just had to throw this out there........

    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    Are real road trips dieing?
    tr.v. died, die·ing, dies
    To cut, form, or stamp with or as if with a die.


    Sorry mskis






    BOT: The best road trips are the ones you least expect. Good times.................
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I am a huge fan of road-tripping, whether for a week or just a day. Around Colorado I will head off into the mountains to seek out the small towns well off the beaten path. Someday I will post pictures of Victor, a great near-ghost mining town. A few years ago I drove from Wisconsin to New Mexico, almost entirely off of the interstate highway system. It introduced me to wonderful small towns like Hannibal, MO, Council Grove, KS, and Silver City, NM, along with a slew of natural places. Most of the route followed the original Santa Fe Trail. They key to a making a good road trip is to leave the interstate behind.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  23. #23
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal
    The key to a making a good road trip is to leave the interstate behind.
    Thanks to the interstate highway system, it is now possilbe to travel across the country from coast to coast without seeing anything.
    -Charles Kuralt

    I loathe the interstate. I only take it when making good time is important. I also rarely take the same route home as I took to my destination. Even if its a local trip.

  24. #24
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by cololi
    Not from the CO direction. I am taking it you are taking I-80 to Rock Springs and then whatever road heads north out of there? If you go all the way to Evanston and head up US 89, I've got a whole list. Otherwise, here is my list of must do's in jackson:
    Yes, but I was also going to go on some "Blue Highways" on the way back. Maybe cut through Riverton on into Casper.

    Ski Jackson Hole and ride the tram. It is being yanked out this year. If you get fresh snow, the Hobacks are some of the longest, thigh burning powder runs you will ever take. Also, at the very least, look into Corbets Couloir, ski it if you can.
    The tram is my reason for going, that and a free place to stay, I skied here in 2003 and have wanted to go back. The Hobacks were killer and I looked into Corbets.

    Get a chocolate cream cheese muffin from the Bunery near the town square. Eat breakfast there too.
    Will do that!

    Try to order a beer from a bar stool at the Million Dollar Cowboy Bar. Feel pissed off at how the bar tenders treat you.
    Been there, but didn't sit in the saddle. Treatment was "Okay". Drank Moose Drool outta the steel bottle.

    Take a sleigh ride through the elk refuge. Pretty cool.
    Sounds Romantic.

    Ice skate on Flat Creek.
    Gotta get my CCMs sharpened then? Cool.

    That is just for starters. Let me know if you want more. I also think that there was someone on the cyburbia who was a planner from Teton Co that could probably give you some better, more local things to do.
    I think I may have PMed him about the tram.

    My main reason is that the tram is closing and I have an old buddy there. He has to move from Jackson to take a job in Aspen (tough life) . Plus he and I haven't skied together in about a year and a half.
    My second reason is that I need to get the hell out of Dodge for a while.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  25. #25
    Cyburbian geobandito's avatar
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    I decided that my last semester break of grad school would probably be the last time I would have four consecutive weeks off for quite a while, so I convinced a friend to take a cross-country road trip with me. Since it was winter, we took the southern route - from Cincinnati to San Francisco and back. Major stops - Montgomery, Biloxi, New Orleans, Austin (Y2K New Years Eve where we got invited to a very bizarre lesbian house party), climbed Guadalupe Peak (highest point in Texas), White Sands NP, Phoenix, Joshua Tree NP, San Diego, LA, the Pacific Coast Highway, San Francisco. And we stopped at Hope, Arkansas, on the way back (seemed like the thing to do). Stayed in hostels, camped, and stayed with family. It was almost all new territory for both of us - saw Stealth fighters, a roadrunner, tumbleweeds for the first time. We did a website as we went along - a blog before the blog was invented. Some of the pics are missing now (and unfortunately some of the ones of gay-cliche me are still up) and a few rather fun details were left out since we knew the family back in Ohio would be reading it, but it's still in existence.

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