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  1. #1
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    Someone recently told me I was a natural architect but I am more interested in city and regional planning; what do I do now?
    bud...


    I ac cidentally dug up and responded to an old post by Dan as follows. Since this was my first post I thought it best to place it in my introduction to avoid continuing the old post string. Anyway in case you missed it, Dan, I’d still like to know how you discovered you are a natural born architect.

    2006-03-17, 10:11 AM #8
    Natural born architect

    Dan,
    How does one know from their birth that they are born to be an architect, i.e., that they are as you say you are?
    Bud...
    +++++
    2001-08-22, 4:31 PM #6
    Quote:
    Originally posted by Dan
    Monday, April 16, 2001 - 11:54 pm
    As a natural-born architect, I, like so many of you, have ideas for a better (or at least I am looking for ideas) built environment...

    2006-03-17, 10:20 AM #9
    Posts: 373 "Design with Nature," by Ian McHarg--a classic and still relevant today.

    2006-03-17, 10:23 AM #10
    Moderator note:
    Dan did not post that originally....it was a repost from the "old" cyburbia in 2001.
    NHPlanner

    2006-03-17, 11:15 AM #11
    NHPlanner,
    I found that post and this site in a yahoo search for "natural born architect" after someone recently told me I was a “natural architect” which they describe as one who is an “intuitive organizer, …having a profound sense of responsibility”; and I would like to learn how to magnify my calling and also how to get paid for it, if possible. Anyway, this site is very pertinent to my interest in the cause of architecture and the problems of city planning. I hope to learn from it as well as to contribute to it as time allows. I am glad to meet you.
    Bud…
    +++++

    2006-03-17, 12:45 PM #12
    That is interesting. Architects are creative and very good at visualizing things in 3 dimensions.
    CosmicMojo

    2006-03-20, 9:57 AM #13
    Architects are responsible for coordinating the work of all design professionals in the building process and should relate to the entire built environment. Their training in three dimensional design would apply to building design or urban design but not necessarily to urban or city and regional planning which is two dimensional; but we can visualize how to build on sloping or wooded sites in sympathy with nature so that bulldozing is unnecessary and sometimes foolish. I am sad to say architects have been unable to maintain responsibility in the site selection process due to the complex problems of financing and politics and traditions of helter-skelter haphazard growth on a regional scale. That innate, inborn sense of responsibility I mentioned above may explain why I could not go along with the general abandonment as well as how I eventually and intuitively came to see a way to solve the problem.
    bud...

    2006-03-20, 11:45 AM #1
    Someone recently told me I was a natural architect but I am more interested in city and regional planning; what do I do now?
    bud...


    Here is a link to my bio - http://www.geocities.com/douglas36601/bio.html

    Quote Originally posted by bud
    2006-03-20, 11:45 AM #1
    Someone recently told me I was a natural architect but I am more interested in city and regional planning than in building design; what do I do now?
    bud...
    In 1957 I was a senior in Architecture at Texas A&M when in the last semester we were given a problem in city planning. Frank Lloyd Wright's Broadacre City concept appeared to be the only genuine solution. Still I could not relate it to the problem we had been given. Someone suggested that the only way to get a grade in the course was to fake it. Unable to solve the problem in the six weeks allotted I withdrew from college. A year later, in 1958 I entered the Taliesin Architectural Fellowship as an apprentice to Frank Lloyd Wright and remained for 14 months. I worked for other architects to complete my training. While completing my internship there was a copy of the December 24, 1965 issue of Life magazine floating around the office - featuring the problems of city planning. One article was titled, “Everything Grows up Every Which Way and No One’s In Charge". I asked an architect in the office where I was working why architects did not take charge; he replied, “Because we have to make a living”. In June of 1966 I opened an office. While waiting for a client I resumed my research in city and regional planning. In a letter to the Governor of Texas about this I received his commendation along with information about the Regional Planning Commission (AKA, Area Councils of Government). In 1977 I finally got a concept. After working out the details I thought I was ready for business in 1988; but it seems I may not be very well suited for the world of commerce even with, or because of the degree I had in business management (ignorance is bliss). Entering business can be a rather complicated process with a number of political and traditional barriers that I still have to adjust to or overcome. I cannot implement the solution by becoming a part of the problem. I believe this can be overcome by following the laws already on the books.

    bud...


    Since it was created by the banking industry early in the past century the City Planning Profession has operated on the pretense that they know better than Architects how to plan cities. I believe Bankers sincerely want to solve this problem but there are probably unconscious motives namely that they enjoy the power of money and that they have a vested it in growing it; the lu st for dominion goes along with that motivation in those whose minds are governed by that passion; As land owners they generally control site selection and thus they dom inate the building industry. Architects cannot compete with them in that respect nor can City Planners even if they wanted to - they would first have to deny their “creator”.

    Architects, as they are educated could not solve the problem of planning for rapid machine age growth in the 20th Century and by their own admission neither has City Planners. Meanwhile the big boys who make the money have us contending with each other rather than cooperating.

    The role of the architect is to coordinate the building process especially the neglected first step namely, Site Selection - this should be done according to an orderly and systematic and streamlined plan. Now the accepted method is to fake it; Bankers have thereby assumed the role of the architect by default. Has everyone become too jaded to accept such a plan, now? If you will I think I have it. Otherwise you may not even want to know about it. But for those who will I have good news. It is self evident; please bear with me.

    bud...

    Last edited by NHPlanner; 23 Mar 2006 at 3:53 PM. Reason: multiple replies consolidated. Please, don't keep replying to yourself and bumping the thread...see the board rules (http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showthread.php?t=14714)

  2. #2
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    hmmmmmmmm.......Welcome from Chicagoland!!!
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  3. #3
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    Thanks

    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    hmmmmmmmm.......Welcome from Chicagoland!!!

    I see no bias

  4. #4
    Cyburbian big_g's avatar
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    Welcome from the Chesapeake Bay!

  5. #5
    When I was in high school they gave everyone a personality test that was supposed to tell them what their future careers could be.

    My results came out with only one career: architect.

    I don't regret telling that test to shove it. If I had listened to it I would now be dressing in black turtlenecks discussing the deconstruction discourse of form with people who can barely afford to eat.

    I'd still like to be an architect, but I know that in the world we live in there is no such thing as architecture anymore. The only way to realize my dream is to change the world, and change myself. I don't need 6 years of graduate school to be an architect. Thomas Jefferson didn't need it. Palladio didn't need it.

    In the meantime you need a job. City planning is as respectable as any other and will put your architectural skills at work.

  6. #6
    Member CosmicMojo's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by bud
    Since it was created by the banking industry early in the past century the City Planning Profession
    err...
    Planning as a profession is actually rooted in the social and housing reform movement to improve living and sanitation conditions and beautify the city. It is more related to social work in it's deepest roots and couldn't be further from the banking industry.

    I suggest Krueckeberg as reading if you really want to learn about the history of planning in the United States.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally posted by CosmicMojo
    err...
    Planning as a profession is actually rooted in the social and housing reform movement to improve living and sanitation conditions and beautify the city. It ...couldn't be further from the banking industry.
    I believe I got that from an Encyclopedia or a book on Banking. Bankers have a vested interest in promoting the welfare of the building industry. Housing was a big social problem at the turn of the last Century; therefore they put their money (and they have it all, don't you know?) into solving the problem as they saw fit. Have you ever wondered why and how they control Congress concerning "Banking and Housing." See the US Code.

    bud...


    Quote Originally posted by big_g
    Welcome from the Chesapeake Bay!
    Thank you very much.

    bud...

    YHWH provides - http://www.geocities.com/douglas36601/YHWH.HTML

    Quote Originally posted by jaws
    When I was in high school they gave everyone a personality test that was supposed to tell them what their future careers could be.

    My results came out with only one career: architect.
    I wonder how they found that out? My high school shop and drafting teacher said I could be an architect after I asked him; I think it was just after I saw the movie The Fountainhead when it came to my hometown about 1950-51.

    After all these years in the profession, I thought it remarkable when I recently found out that it was my destiny according to planetary configurations at the time of my birth - http://www.geocities.com/douglas36601/bio.html ; and that it led me to this forum as I explained above.

    bud...

    YHWH provides - http://www.geocities.com/douglas36601/YHWH.HTML
    Last edited by NHPlanner; 27 Mar 2006 at 12:14 PM. Reason: triple reply

  8. #8
    Member CosmicMojo's avatar
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    more available on the history of Planning at the APA website

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