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Thread: Unexpected Quotes from Historical Figures

  1. #1

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    Unexpected Quotes from Historical Figures

    I was reading a little essay on this particular historical figure, and I was struck by the following quote. So, I thought an interesting ongoing thread would be "Unexpected Quotes" that don't meet your expectations for the person in question. Kinda verbal "Guess the City"

    So, let's try mine:

    “It is but equity, besides,” he wrote, “that they who feed, cloath and lodge the whole body of the people, should have such a share of the produce of their own labour as to be themselves tolerably well fed, cloathed and lodged.”

  2. #2
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    I was reading a little essay on this particular historical figure, and I was struck by the following quote. So, I thought an interesting ongoing thread would be "Unexpected Quotes" that don't meet your expectations for the person in question. Kinda verbal "Guess the City"

    So, let's try mine:

    “It is but equity, besides,” he wrote, “that they who feed, cloath and lodge the whole body of the people, should have such a share of the produce of their own labour as to be themselves tolerably well fed, cloathed and lodged.”
    Ben Franklin? Him, or Karl Marx!
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    Ben Franklin? Him, or Karl Marx!
    Nope. Same general era. The mythologized version of him is popular among the "libertarian" CEO set.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Alexander Hamilton??????????
    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany"

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally posted by btrage
    Alexander Hamilton??????????

    Nope

    Hint: He was (sorta) a European who rarely left his hometown and ended up wroking as a government inspector.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
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    Adam Smith? I have a vague recollection of something along those lines from my undergrad years...

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    Quote Originally posted by Bubba
    Adam Smith? I have a vague recollection of something along those lines from my undergrad years...
    Ding Ding Ding! Bubba gets a prize. The Prophet of Laissez Faire never spoke at all about the "invisible hand"


    Nor, on the other hand, would he be thrilled by today's voracious State (40% in the UK, I read).

    Anyone else have any strange and wondrous quotes....feel free.

  8. #8

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    Here's another one, less unexpected this time, but still amazing.

    The ethic of conservation is the explicit abnegation of man's dominion over the Earth. The lower species are here for our use. God said so: Go forth, be fruitful, multiply, and rape the planet--it's yours. That's our job: drilling, mining and stripping. Sweaters are the anti-Biblical view. Big gas-guzzling cars with phones and CD players and wet bars -- that's the Biblical view.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian AubieTurtle's avatar
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    There are few, I believe, in this enlightened age, who will not acknowledge that slavery as an institution is a moral and political evil.
    Of course, when you read the rest of the letter this quote comes from, it doesn't seem as out of character.
    As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron. - H.L. Mencken

  10. #10
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    I would not be surprised if George Washington once said, “Please allow me to puff on this fine joint”
    The most foolish thing one can do this fall is to vote for Clinton or Trump. Wake up, get out of the matrix, and send a message to the political establishment that you won't play their game.

  11. #11
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis
    I would not be surprised if George Washington once said, “Please allow me to puff on this fine joint”
    Nor would it surprise me, as both he and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  12. #12
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Newt Gingrich once stated that he thought FDR was the greatest American president, believe it or not.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    I'll have to find some of those gooooood quotes from Martin Luther about the virtues of good beer, just for those preachers whom are a wee bit too deep into the 'Hellfire and brimstone' side of Protestantism.



    Mike

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Bubba's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mgk920
    I'll have to find some of those gooooood quotes from Martin Luther about the virtues of good beer, just for those preachers whom are a wee bit too deep into the 'Hellfire and brimstone' side of Protestantism.
    Here you go:

    "We old folks have to find our cushions and pillows in our tankards. Strong beer is the milk of the old."
    -Martin Luther

  15. #15
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by BKM
    Here's another one, less unexpected this time, but still amazing.
    That would be the one and only Ann Coulter.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  16. #16
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner
    That would be the one and only Ann Coulter.
    Therefore, she's a a whole case of fubar!!!
    Last edited by mendelman; 12 Apr 2006 at 12:31 PM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    Nor would it surprise me, as both he and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp.
    This reminds me of a story about a farmer growing hemp and finding his roadside plants were constantly being "liberated". He put up a sign that read" You'd have to smoke a joint the size of a telephone pole to get a buzz from this stuff". IIRC, the liberations stopped shortly afterwards.
    No longer for better. No longer for worse. And certainly not for lunch.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian illinoisplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman
    Therefore, she's a a whole case of fubar!!!
    I think she was over-exaggerating and possibly being sarcastic.
    "Life's a journey, not a destination"
    -Steven Tyler

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally posted by illinoisplanner
    I think she was over-exaggerating and possibly being sarcastic.
    I doubt it. Her public persona is to be this offensive (Liberals as Traitors, Nuke "em all and convert 'em to Christianity, etc). Whether Mann Coulter really believes this schtick in her heart of hearts, only god can answer.

  20. #20
    The Adam Smith myth?
    Adam Smith did not found the science of economics, but he did indeed create the paradigm of the British classical school, and it is often useful for the creator of a paradigm to be inchoate and confused, thereby leaving room for disciples who will attempt to clarify and systematize the contributions of the Master. Until the 1950s, economists, at least those in the Anglo-American tradition, revered Smith as the founder, and saw the later development of economics as a movement linearly upward into the light, with Smith succeeded by Ricardo and Mill, and then, after a bit of diversion created by the Austrians in the 1870s, Alfred Marshall establishing neoclassical economics as a neo-Ricardian and hence neo-Smithian discipline. In a sense, John Maynard Keynes, Marshall 's student at Cambridge , thought that he was only filling in the gaps in the Ricardian-Marshallian heritage.
    Into this complacent miasma of Smith-worship, Joseph A. Schumpeter's History of Economic Analysis (1954) came as a veritable blockbuster. Coming from the continental Walrasian and Austrian traditions rather than from British classicism, Schumpeter was able, for virtually the first time, to cast a cold and realistic eye upon the celebrated Scot. Writing with thinly veiled contempt, Schumpeter generally denigrated Smith's contribution, and essentially held that Smith had shunted economics off on a wrong road, a road unfortunately different from that of his continental forbears.

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