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Thread: books on international planning/ urban development

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    61

    books on international planning/ urban development

    Hi all,

    I'm looking for some suggestions on good books about international planning/urban development, more interested in development in third world or developing countries. I've read and liked "Shadow Cities."

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    61

    interesting

    Quote Originally posted by urbanleopold
    Hi all,

    I'm looking for some suggestions on good books about international planning/urban development, more interested in development in third world or developing countries. I've read and liked "Shadow Cities."

    Thanks.
    I thought it was interesting that this post got a fair amount of views but no responses at all.

    I still think "Shadow Cities" is a pretty good example of a readable book that at least gives some interesting examples of urban development abroad. The only other one I was really able to come across at the Portland Public library was a bit outdated but still interesting. It's called "Victims of development" by Jeremy Seabrook. It's basically critical of the impact of globalization on developing countries, and it was published in 1993, but it gives some interesting snapshots of development in third world countries and mostly talks about environmental consequences and the displacement of the poor as a result of development.

    Why does there seem to be so few books on international development (not referring to international aid or even globalization specifically, but simply the development of cities in foreign countries)? Is it simply not explored very much? Is everything written about it really dry?

    Maybe I should post this in another forum?

  3. #3
    Not particularly related to urban planning, but Hernando de Soto's The Mystery of Capital is a great exploration of the property and economic mess in the third world. Succinctly said the reason why globalization made some countries rich and not others is a problem of individual rights and bureaucratic incompetence. If I recall correctly it can take a year's full-time work to get a legitimate business license in Port-au-Prince.

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