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Thread: Teardown article

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Plus JNA's avatar
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    Teardown article

    Teardowns' have critics torn up

    Headline and Article from USA TODAY.

    Highlights:
    The National Trust for Historic Preservation has identified 300 communities in 33 states that are experiencing a rash of teardowns, a jump from 100 communities in 20 states four years ago.

    These preservationists are in effect trying to run other people's lives based on their aesthetic sensibilities,” says Roger Pilon, vice president for legal affairs at the libertarian Cato Institute in Washington, D.C. “Whose property is it anyway? To have property is to be able to use it in the way you want, provided you're not violating the rights of others.”

    There is so much outrage in communities over this practice,” he says. “People think they don't have tools to deal with it.” The trust has issued an online guide to help cities and residents oppose teardowns. Some of the tools: set-back requirements to limit the size of a home, design standards and zoning revisions.
    National Trust link:
    http://www.nationaltrust.org/teardowns/

    Is this becoming a issue / problem in your community ?
    or
    as metioned in the article -
    teardowns can be an antidote to sprawl because new homes are built in developed areas rather than on farmland miles from job centers.
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

  2. #2
         
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    Most of the tear down I see is moslty unavoidable and is being rebuilt properly. MOST of it.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    Yes, it is. Our community has drafted compatible infill ordinances to insure that teardowns are rebuilt in a compatible manner (height, stbacks, roof pitches, etc).

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    We just tear them down with no plans for the ground. End up with open lots and seas of parking. We call it "Progress by bulldozer"

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    We have been having about 150 residential teardowns a year for the last couple years, but most of what is being torn down is not very "historic" (1950s and 1960s ranches), so we're really not losing much "good" stock. Though, people still feel the "character" is being "ruined".

    I think that the phenomenon is 85% good for the localities.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  6. #6
         
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    I was in your neck of the woods today (Game at Fenwick then ate at Poor Phils) and I didn't see any recent construction or tear downs

  7. #7
    Member Wulf9's avatar
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    Historic preservation is not the preservation of buildings for "aesthetics," it is the preservation of information. In the case of a building, the most information that can be preserved is the building itself and the setting that building is in.

    The best way to illustrate this is to think about telling your present or future grandchildren about some part of your childhood. Perhaps you want to show them where you went to school. Maybe you went to an elegant two story brick schoolhouse. Here in California, most of those have been demolished for seismic reasons.

    So these grandkids can't imagine a two-story schoolhouse or an elegant schoolhouse, and you set out to show them the school itself. If it's demolished, you have to show them a similar schoolhouse. If they are all demolished, you have to show them a picture. If you can't find the picture, all you have is something they will consider to be a tall tale. "When I was a kid, we had schools made of brick, and they had inside hallways and lockers." (That's a California joke. New schools look like mini storage facilities. You have to carry all your stuff around in a backpack).

    So that's how it works. The item itself has the most information. Then a similar item. Then a picture. Then your foggy memory.

    There is a value to the past. But you don't have to save all of the past. A good way to look at it is that we as planners are stewards for a larger audience. If we have the only example of a historic resource with international, national, or statewide significance in our jurisdiction, we should be exceptional stewards. Folks will read about those events and resources and come to see them. We should try to keep them and their settings intact.

    If the resources are of representative importance (there are good examples elsewhere) or of local significance, we are stewards for local residents. I tend to think those are also extremely important. But, if they are demolished, we have only deprived a small audience of its history, and we don't need to be as exceptional stewards. Of course, that audience is the one that would most likely want to show their granchildren the school they went to, but it's small, nonetheless.

  8. #8
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by burnham follower
    I was in your neck of the woods today (Game at Fenwick then ate at Poor Phils) and I didn't see any recent construction or tear downs
    Actually, not where I live, where I work.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

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