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Thread: grad school questions (as specific as poss)

  1. #1
    Cyburbian
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    grad school questions (as specific as poss)

    Hello! Which schools fit this criteria?

    -East coast
    -Preferably an urban setting, though an area such as Chapel Hill would not be excluded
    -Money is a consideration - so cost of living/tuition and availability of graduate assistantships is very important
    -Policy oriented program
    -Focus or courses related to economic and downtown development
    -Faculty involved in local community

    As of now: thinking about VT (Alexandria) and UNC. Columbia is another possibility but the thought of living in NYC seems daunting due to high cost of living.

    Thank you in advance!

  2. #2
    Quote Originally posted by ebina49
    Hello! Which schools fit this criteria?

    -East coast
    -Preferably an urban setting, though an area such as Chapel Hill would not be excluded
    -Money is a consideration - so cost of living/tuition and availability of graduate assistantships is very important
    -Policy oriented program
    -Focus or courses related to economic and downtown development
    -Faculty involved in local community

    As of now: thinking about VT (Alexandria) and UNC. Columbia is another possibility but the thought of living in NYC seems daunting due to high cost of living.

    Thank you in advance!

    VT(Alexandria) would be a good choice. Nice urban setting, cost of living in Northern VA isn't exactly cheap but is definitely affordable, and they have lots of money to give to students due to their "newer program" status. Plus the research center there is gaining credibility by the day and the professors, at least the ones that I met, were very impressive.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by mk1515
    VT(Alexandria) would be a good choice. Nice urban setting, cost of living in Northern VA isn't exactly cheap but is definitely affordable, and they have lots of money to give to students due to their "newer program" status. Plus the research center there is gaining credibility by the day and the professors, at least the ones that I met, were very impressive.
    Thanks for the feedback. The location is fabulous - the DC area is a lot of fun and Alexandria is an interesting area as far as historically preserved architecture goes.

    I also would hope that the VT program, being near DC, would draw adjunct professors with expertise in politics/policy (that being my undergrad background). However, I am concerned that the program is very small and perhaps the course selection isn't as varied as at other universities simply because you can't cross-register with other departments.

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    What about Virginia Commonweath (VCU) in Richmond? I think it is pretty affordable, especially in-state, and they might offer you some good financial aid.

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    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ebina49
    Hello! Which schools fit this criteria?

    -East coast
    -Preferably an urban setting, though an area such as Chapel Hill would not be excluded
    -Money is a consideration - so cost of living/tuition and availability of graduate assistantships is very important
    -Policy oriented program
    -Focus or courses related to economic and downtown development
    -Faculty involved in local community

    As of now: thinking about VT (Alexandria) and UNC. Columbia is another possibility but the thought of living in NYC seems daunting due to high cost of living.

    Thank you in advance!
    Look at Rutgers....I'm headed there in the fall. http://policy.rutgers.edu

    -Obviously it is on the East Coast.

    -The planning program is in the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. Pay attention to which school the planning program is located in at any university, it will tell you alot about what emphasis it has.

    -Although not located in an urban setting in the truest sense of the word EJB's building is new and is located in the downtown of New Brunswick which is undergoing renovation and revitalization. The planning program has been able to actively participate in the process. In addition the planning program has a huge stake in the redevelopment process of Camden, NJ.

    -Rutgers is a public institution with very reasonable tuition rates even for out of state students. I am not sure of the total number of students with funding but of the five schools I applied to they were the only ones that offered funding and even though it was not an assistantship it was enough to offset about 85% of my tuition/fees. The school itself appears to be committed to funding students and there is a wide range of funding opportunities. Housing comes in all varieties on or off campus and much of it appeared decently affordable for most people.

    -Much of the faculty lives in and are engaged in the community or surrounding communities of New Brunswick. EJB also is home to 20 research institutes.

    I will say that when I visited Rutgers for the admitted students open house that all of the graduate students we met (and they were alot) were very happy in the program and with the faculty and their experiences. All of the faculty are committed to the success of the students and the program and have been accessible from day one.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  6. #6
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by ebina49
    Hello! Which schools fit this criteria?

    -East coast
    -Preferably an urban setting, though an area such as Chapel Hill would not be excluded
    -Money is a consideration - so cost of living/tuition and availability of graduate assistantships is very important
    -Policy oriented program
    -Focus or courses related to economic and downtown development
    -Faculty involved in local community

    As of now: thinking about VT (Alexandria) and UNC. Columbia is another possibility but the thought of living in NYC seems daunting due to high cost of living.

    Thank you in advance!
    Florida State would fit most of this

    1) East Coast
    2)While not an NYC urban setting, the school is in a growing city of 170,000, most of the problems of a city much larger than that with a track that is for community development, and coursework in economic development.

    3) The program is a policy oriented program
    4) The faculty is an active part of the local community, A large number of the studio projects in the program involve working with local government on specific programs.
    5) Tuition isn't too bad, especially for In-state tuition, the cost of living is decent, and because you are in the state capital, there are numerous planning jobs available to gain experience in while in school.

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    Cyburbian njm's avatar
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    Columbia would probably be the last NYC program to consider if you're concerned about money. NYU (not much less) has a lot of VERY strong ties to the community. Hunter is a small school in a big university (CUNY) in a big city. The faculty may not be as involved, but the tuition is a song... and you're in a big city.

    Furthermore, Rutgers is part of a big city in a sense. At 50 mins by train from NYC, it is well within the commuting distance sphere of the city, and a lot of of NJ state's policy is steered by the NYC suburbs in the north (Rutgers is the state university in New Jersey.)

    When are you thinking about aplying for? I'm prepping for a fall 2007 admission to Rutgers... so I may wish you luck (but not too much luck)
    What luck! A random assemblage of words never sounded less intelligent.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
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    As of right now, I am planning to apply for fall 07. But I'm not 100% sure - I have yet to take GRE's - I have to start moving on all this stuff probably if I want to apply for that semester.

    edit - sorta nervous since my background is not planning - so no internship or work experience directly related - though a couple programs i've gone through are indirectly related.

    Quote Originally posted by njm
    Columbia would probably be the last NYC program to consider if you're concerned about money. NYU (not much less) has a lot of VERY strong ties to the community. Hunter is a small school in a big university (CUNY) in a big city. The faculty may not be as involved, but the tuition is a song... and you're in a big city.

    Furthermore, Rutgers is part of a big city in a sense. At 50 mins by train from NYC, it is well within the commuting distance sphere of the city, and a lot of of NJ state's policy is steered by the NYC suburbs in the north (Rutgers is the state university in New Jersey.)

    When are you thinking about aplying for? I'm prepping for a fall 2007 admission to Rutgers... so I may wish you luck (but not too much luck)

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