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Thread: Transplants: How has life been for in the South?

  1. #1
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    Transplants: How has life been for in the South?

    In the past 5 to 10 years, I've notice a great number of people have moved to the South form other parts of the country and the world. I've wandered how people from these areas felt about there new area, and how it differs from where they are originally from.

    Are you from another part of the country such as the Northeast, Midwest, or elsewhere in the U.S. or the world, and have relocated to the South? What area (e.g., city, town, or region) of the South do you live? Furthermore, how has life been for you here (again, in the South) compared to where you originally come from?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    I'm from the northeast and moved to south Florida, albeit a part of the region that has more in common with Alabama/Georgia than the Miami/Fort Lauderdale. Basically it's pretty southern in character though this is changing as more transplants move in. One thing I have noticed is that people are much friendlier than up north yet violent crime is way more common. Is this the southern hospitality paradox?

  3. #3
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    As a native Southerner I feel compelled to say, "stay home dirty carpetbaggers."

    Only kidding of course.

    Another question, along the same lines, I would be interested in is how are Southerners who have moved away coping?
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  4. #4
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by H
    Another question, along the same lines, I would be interested in is how are Southerners who have moved away coping?
    My mother, born and raised in Memphis, has had a tough time finding decent fried okra in her 30 years in Denver. But we do have hot pepper vinegar!
    She is enjoying dry weather.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN
    My mother, born and raised in Memphis, has had a tough time finding decent fried okra in her 30 years in Denver. But we do have hot pepper vinegar!
    In Colorado, Utah, and California, you can't get grits in chain restaurants that normally serve it. I tried to order grits in Bakersfield, CA and was told "I have only had ONE woman every ask me for that in all my years working here." I said "That was probably me. I was here about a year ago and I think I did try to order grits then too."

  6. #6
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    Things we've noticed (moving from large northeastern city to small southeastern city)*:

    1) People are much nicer and easier to meet and hang out with
    2) People get outdoors much more frequently (tennis, camping, beach, boating, etc.)
    3) Farm fresh produce and home cooking (esp. BBQ) are much more prevelent and common
    4) The pay for unskilled and/or blue collar jobs is extremely low (even for firemen and police officers)
    5) The job market is much less robust and companies behave less professionally when hiring
    6) Some relatively common things are really hard to find (bean sprouts, sake, butcher, florist, etc.)
    7) Many people drive with a complete disregard for pedestrians and bicyclists
    8) Religion (particularly Christianity) is much more openly discussed (even at work)
    9) Taxes, utilities, and insurance are not much cheaper, while housing and most services are much cheaper

    *Disclaimer: This only reflects our personal experience after eight months of living in the South. It is not intended as a blanket statement. We also moved from an extremely dense troubled urban neighborhood in a very large city to a medium-density neighborhood close to the downtown of a small historic city.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    I've actually had grits several times here in Chicago. It's probably a lot like getting Pizza on the west coast though (which is to say, it's red and it's round but it ain't pizza! ). The only chain that I know that comes up this far north and serves it is Cracker Barrel but it's turbo kitsch.
    Reality does not conform to your ideology.
    http://neighborhoods.chicago.il.us Photographs of Life in the Neighborhoods of Chicago
    http://hafd.org/~jordanb/ Pretentious Weblog.

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    Quote Originally posted by jordanb
    I've actually had grits several times here in Chicago. It's probably a lot like getting Pizza on the west coast though (which is to say, it's red and it's round but it ain't pizza! ). The only chain that I know that comes up this far north and serves it is Cracker Barrel but it's turbo kitsch.
    Hey...just because it doesn't weigh five pound per slice doesn't mean that West Coast pizza isn't "pizza."

    I went to school in the (upper) south (Virginia) and my first job was in Tennessee. People were indeed quite friendly, but I didn't find it all that easy to meet people-as a single guy, the strong family and church orientation made it more difficult in some ways. For example, workplace friendships were not very strong at my job in Tennessee when compared to out here in California.

    Pretty limited, short term experience, of course.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Man With a Plan's avatar
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    The South has been great! I moved from the Boston area to Northern Virginia a year ago and it's been a great experience! I have never met more liberal, open-minded people in my life! In addition, the citizens demand progressive planning.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Man With a Plan
    The South has been great! I moved from the Boston area to Northern Virginia a year ago and it's been a great experience! I have never met more liberal, open-minded people in my life! In addition, the citizens demand progressive planning.
    Do you think NoVa really qualifies as the south though?

  11. #11
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller
    Do you think NoVa really qualifies as the south though?
    It's south of the Mason-Dixon line...therefore it is part of the South.

    End of story....no debate.

    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller
    Do you think NoVa really qualifies as the south though?
    I was going to say the same thing, but refrained. Just because a city/region has a large number of non-southerners it does not magically transform into the North. Virginia is clearly in the South, as is all of North Carolina and Georgia. Certain areas of the South may not meet all of the "qualities" and/or "stereotypes" of the South, that does not mean they are not part of the South.

    Man With a Plan did not claim to live in the "Deep South."

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Man With a Plan's avatar
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    Great question- With its location south of the Mason Dixon line, Magnolia trees, red soil, and bungalow houses, it looks like the South to me. However, some of the people from the Deep South who have moved here say it's the North. Studying geography, I was always taught that Virginia is a Southern state.


    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller
    Do you think NoVa really qualifies as the south though?

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Plus PlannerGirl's avatar
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    NoVa is on the map as in the South but the mindset is NOT at all very southern. The rest of Va thinks NoVa could go to hades in a handbasket with the rest of the carpet baggers.

    Yup Im from the south but live in NoVa-this is NOT a good representation of the South at all.
    "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Ben Franklin

    Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming 'WOO- HOO what a ride!'"

  15. #15
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Loudoun and some of the western burbs may still have some southern resemblance but the closer you get to the beltway its anywhere USA for the most part IMO. And I think the sprawl in NoVa is actually worse than Broward...

    Sorry, I'm in a trolling mood if you haven't noticed (stupid traffic engineers )

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    MZ, If you know where to look you can get grits in restaurants in Colorado. Granted you will never find them at Denny's. I did had some with my biscuit, gravy, ham and eggs just this past Sunday morning. I grew-up on grits even though I was raised west of the Missouri River.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian dandy_warhol's avatar
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    i'm from the North. went to grad school in the South. and am eager to return to the North.

    i enjoyed living in New Orleans, with the exception of hurricanes. but i enjoy the Northeast much more. mostly because of interregional mass transportation, the proximity of many great cities, the belief that christianity is not the only religion, and snow.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian Michele Zone's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Senior Jefe
    MZ, If you know where to look you can get grits in restaurants in Colorado. Granted you will never find them at Denny's. I did had some with my biscuit, gravy, ham and eggs just this past Sunday morning. I grew-up on grits even though I was raised west of the Missouri River.
    When passing through, one does not have time to go searching for a restaurant with a particular food. I rarely eat a big breakfast, except when traveling. At such times, grits is pretty important to me. I don't eat grits "all the time" or anything. I have been known to substitute ...um....cooked corn meal, which has some fancy Italian name that I can't recall right this second. (Polento??)

  19. #19
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Michele Zone
    (Polento??)
    Close, polenta. You can also slice polenta and fry it. Very, very good.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Originally from the west coast (born and raised on the northern California coast), I moved from the northwest to the Deep South a little over two years ago. Itís been a wonderful experience and I have no regrets. Very friendly people (Iíve mentioned in other threads that there really is something about Southern hospitality), I like the climate (except the hurricanes, of course), lower cost of living, and good work environment. I have nothing but positive things to say about my new home (except for the limited wine selection).
    Annoyingly insensitive

  21. #21
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Sigh... I moved from FL to Mass. for college. What a shocker. I came back as soon as I could. That's something that has rarely been studied, except for post WW-2 African Americans moving north. It is such a culture shock for everyone else, too.

    I don't know why Yankees freak out when they move to the south anymore, it's overrun by Yankees by now, anyway, so they shouldn't feel any different, except for the climate (bitch, bitch, bitch....)

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