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Thread: Pickles: Heinz 57

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Pickles: Heinz 57

    I'm going to go home and fix myself a ham on rye for lunch. Naturally, I will have to have one of the dill pickles we canned in 2004 (25 freakin' quarts from only six cucumber plants, but that's a post for the vegetable garden thread). I hate to say it, but I actually like the taste of store-bought Clausen dills much more than our homemade pickles Maybe I'll try a different recipe next time we can pickles but in the mean time I have committed myself to not buying any store-bought pickles until we've depleted our own stores.

    When most people think of pickles they immediately think of pickled cucumbers. Pickling, however, is just a preserving process and any number of vegetables can be pickled and preserved. Ever had spicy Korean kimchee? Guess what, that's just pickled vegetables with hot spices. Pickled peppers are sort of popular in these parts - most grocery stores stock them. I've even tried pickled carrots once - they were actually pretty tasty.

    My all time favorite pickles, though were these Indian pickles (I wish I knew what they were called) I had at an Indian restaurant one time. What are some of your favorite types of pickle?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  2. #2
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    I don't like pickles

    or at least pickled cucumbers.

    To my knowledge I have not tried other types of pickled vegetables - but I don't know that I would like them- since I like cucumbers but not pickled cucumbers.

    How come cucumbers are the most popular pickled vegetable? Could you pickle fruit? That would be interesting.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Claussens are my favourite store-bought pickles. Unfortunately, can't find them in Edmonton.

    But my all-time favourite pickles are the ones that you get in REAL delis in NY/LA/etc., where they have big open pickle jars right at your table. I used to eat three or four pickles when I would go to Solley's in L.A.... god, those things were probably packed with germs from kids not using the tongs and just sticking their hands right into the jars, but who cares... they are delish!

    I hate sweet pickles, and can only stomach them as a little bit of relish in tunafish sandwiches. Otherwise, can't touch 'em!

  4. #4

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    Beets

    Anyone like pickled beets? I like 'em but my wife can't stand them. I like pickled onions too. When it comes to pickle pickles though, I like the Vlasic ones the best.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    The only thing I like pickled is my liver.
    Annoyingly insensitive

  6. #6
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    Is relish made of pickles? I like relish but hate pickles. Weird.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DPP
    Anyone like pickled beets? I like 'em but my wife can't stand them. I like pickled onions too. When it comes to pickle pickles though, I like the Vlasic ones the best.
    Off-topic:
    My husband & kids love these. I can't stand them. My mother-in-law makes them at home (in Nova Scotia) and then sends them out to us around Christmas every year. The giant jar (and the beet relish) last us pretty much the whole year. I actually like beets, but it's the cloves in the pickled beets that make me want to yak. Bleh.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Living with a number of Jewish friends in college, I have grown accustomed to Kosher Pickles only. I also only will buy Hebrew National hot dogs, sausages, and knockwurst.

    I may have to pick up some pickles tonight! Good snacks!
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    I've only recently come into the fold of enjoying pickles. Until about a year ago I didn't much care for them. The lunch room in our building serves sandwiches with a half pickle on the side. Now a sandwich isn't as good unless it comes with a pickle. Don't have a particular brand I love or hate.

    When my son was a toddler we went to the grocery and the cart was a little too close to the shelves. Bryce leaned out and before I could stop him he grabbed a big jar of pickles and CRASH down they went. Not only was the breaking jar loud as a gunshot, but there was a strong odor of pickle juice immediately. Before you could say "Clean up on aisle nine" a clerk appeared ready to clean up the mess. Bryce does love his pickles.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

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  10. #10
    Cyburbian dobopoq's avatar
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    I love pickles, but most of the major name brands use preservatives such as polysorbate 80 or sodium benzoate etc. I try to avoid preservatives as much as possible because of their links to cancer. In places like health food stores and farmers markets, you can track down preservative free pickles but the problem is compounded if you're living carfree.

    As for cucumbers, I love spicy dill pickles the most. Didn't used to like sweet pickles but a girlfriend turned me onto them. Pickled garlic relish is an orgy of taste for the mouth, but it also leaves an orgy of stank. Kimchi is also excellent. In small doses, pickled herring is a delicacy. Of course sushi is unthinkable without pickled ginger - mmmm. Pickled peppers? - I need to get ahold of Peter Piper.
    "The current American way of life is founded not just on motor transportation but on the religion of the motorcar, and the sacrifices that people are prepared to make for this religion stand outside the realm of rational criticism." -Lewis Mumford

  11. #11
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    My all time favorite pickles, though were these Indian pickles (I wish I knew what they were called) I had at an Indian restaurant one time. What are some of your favorite types of pickle?
    We love love love pickled food at our house and not the cucumber kind! The Indian pickle that you speak of at the restaurant was most likely a chili lime pickle. That is my personal favorite especially with garlic in it. At least one kind of pickle is commonly served with an Indian meal. Pickling is an art form in India due to the fact that many places have intermittent electricity and outside of the cities not a whole lot of people have refrigerators. Of the Indian pickles....my favorites are chili lime pickle, lemon pickle, and green mango pickle (goes well with breakfast fare). If you have an Indian food store near you I suggest you visit and raid the pickle section. Most come in jars or in mylar type pouches.

    The other type of pickles we eat are middle eastern. Spicy green beans, cauliflower, red peppers, olives, and eggplant are some of our favorites.

    I've canned the traditional dill cucumber pickles and mine turned out pretty tasty. I used the garlic dill pickle recipe from the Better Homes & Gardens Canning & Preserving Recipes book (ISBN 0696211505). Everyone that has tried them likes them.

    Cheers!
    Kim
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  12. #12
    Cyburbian
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    Pickled green tomatoes

    A few years ago, when frost was imminent, we pickled all the green tomatoes left on our plants. Put them on sandwiches for the next year. Couldn't hardly tell the difference between them and pickled cucumbers.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by savemattoon
    A few years ago, when frost was imminent, we pickled all the green tomatoes left on our plants. Put them on sandwiches for the next year. Couldn't hardly tell the difference between them and pickled cucumbers.
    Ahh...The green tomato, one of the main ingredients for chow chow. You Southerners should know about it and everybody else should try and get some. It's like pickle relish, only spicy and better. I for one will be taking a few jars from my parents basement during my next visit.

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    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by biscuit
    Ahh...The green tomato, one of the main ingredients for chow chow. You Southerners should know about it and everybody else should try and get some. It's like pickle relish, only spicy and better. I for one will be taking a few jars from my parents basement during my next visit.
    I like the spicy chow-chow. There is a Mennonite lady that is local and her family makes the best I've ever had.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  15. #15
    Cyburbian
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    I cannot stand pickles. If they get put on a burger or sandwich, I cannot eat it. Even the smell gets to me. Ithink pickles are the only food that I just cannot be around.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian
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    Ohh, pickling!! My family is very traditional German and have and still do pickle pretty much anything ever. The original pickled cucumber or course, but also pork hocks (pigs feet), chicken and turkey gizzards, liver, tongue, fish, eggs, heart, you name it. I got tricked into eating it when i was younger, but now can't stand the sight or ESPECIALLY the smell of any of it.

    I do love a good pickled cucumber though. My grandma made the best.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I like crisp, cold dill pickles. But not the limp, luke-warm wedges that restaurants seem to use as "garnish" on a sandwich plate.

    The only sandwich I can eat with pickles in it is a cuban.

  18. #18
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by imaplanner
    Is relish made of pickles? I like relish but hate pickles. Weird.
    Yeah, relish is chopped pickles, but I'll bet the reason you like relish better is twofold - one, it might be due to a texture thing; two, the most popular/familiar pickles to north american pallets are dill pickles. Relish is usually made from a type of sweet pickle recipe, it could just be that you like sweet pickles better than dill.



    Concerning the thread title, did you know contrary to popular belief that Heinz originally did not produce 57 varieties of pickles?
    http://www.snopes.com/business/hidden/heinz57.asp

    Quote Originally posted by biscuit
    Ahh...The green tomato, one of the main ingredients for chow chow
    I can't stand fried green tomatoes, but I like chow chow pickles. I guess imaplanner isn't the only wierdo around.

    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek
    Indian pickle that you speak of at the restaurant was most likely a chili lime pickle.
    It was sorta hot and I think it may have had garlicky taste too, come to think of it. It could very well have been a chili lime pickle.

    I'll bet you're right that Indians have maintained pickling as a fine art thanks in part to the scarcity/reliability of refrigeration as a means of preservation. Prior to refrigeration how could food be preserved? It could be dried, salted, stored in a cellar, or it could be pickled. Just about every European cooking tradition has its own pickling recipes, same thing with middle eastern cultures. I wonder if any regions/cultures in Africa pickled?

    Quote Originally posted by imaplanner
    Could you pickle fruit? That would be interesting
    Ever had watermelon pickles?

    Quote Originally posted by Richmod Jake
    The only thing I like pickled is my liver.
    Then I suppose you'd be interested in this:
    Quote Originally posted by food.com
    Another method of "pickling" chiles is to preserve them in liquor. This method has several advantages to it, including the fact that the process can be completed without using the stove. Also, alcohol tends to change the chiles less than vinegar. Simply cut or poke a hole in each chile and cover with your preferred liquor. Vodka, gin, vermouth, and rum all produce tasty results. Not only does this process preserve chiles, it also produces some very interesting drinks!
    Last edited by Maister; 21 Jul 2006 at 1:55 PM.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  19. #19
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    slightly ot

    I put up some cucumbers last year but I fermented them just like sauerkraut. They're OK, a little different. I think I'm going to make sauerkraut again this year. I throw in cayenne peppers before fermenting the kraut. Adds a little "bite."
    WALSTIB

  20. #20
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tom R
    I put up some cucumbers last year but I fermented them just like sauerkraut. They're OK, a little different. I think I'm going to make sauerkraut again this year. I throw in cayenne peppers before fermenting the kraut. Adds a little "bite."
    I plan to make my own sauerkraut for the first time this weekend. I just checked the garden and it looks like I've got a head of cabbage big enough to harvest now.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  21. #21
    I like pickled herring with raw onions on pumpernickel as part of a good dansk smorgasbrod. With gammeldansk to cleanse the palate and tuborg gron to wash it down. But then, only when I'm in danmark.

    Anything else pickled is not for me.

  22. #22
          Downtown's avatar
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    mmmm - brine pickles. salty deliciousness.

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Tom R's avatar
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    kraut

    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    I plan to make my own sauerkraut for the first time this weekend. I just checked the garden and it looks like I've got a head of cabbage big enough to harvest now.
    How big of a crock do you have? One cabbage might not be enough.
    WALSTIB

  24. #24
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
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    One of my strongest and fondest memories as a child is reachng elbow deep into a pickle barrel to fish out salt brine kosher pickles.

    About every year or two my parents make a batch of salt prine pickles and send me a gallon jar. You wash the salt/mold layer off of them, bite the crunchy skin, then suck the goopy middle out.

    As for other vegetables that are pickled beets (yum), string beans (depends on the recipe), hot peppers.

    Now for the weird list pickled pears, awesome with hand cut french fries and vinegar.

    Pickled crab apples, on there own.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  25. #25
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tom R
    How big of a crock do you have? One cabbage might not be enough.
    It's pretty small - maybe five quarts (tops). There's gotta be a recipe for a small batch of sauerkraut out there somewhere....
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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