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Thread: Childhood Epiphanies

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
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    Childhood Epiphanies

    One of my daughters experienced a childhood epiphany relating to freedom of movement and self determinism. She finally learned how to ride a bike. Her twin sister has been riding for over 3 years, but finally at the ripe old age of 7, she learned. The looks of concentration and discovery on her face as she picked the skill up was priceless. It was akin to taking her first step.

    It was one of those episodes where you are sooooooooo glad to be a parent (plus she learned on my turf rather than her mother's ). This morning she was up and out of the door at 7:45 a.m. and as I sipped coffee on my porch she rode around the block.

    What are some other childhood epiphanies? When these occur, how do you feel as a parent?
    "And all this terrible change had come about because he had ceased to believe himself and had taken to believing others. " - Leo Tolstoy

  2. #2
    NIMBY asshatterer Plus Richmond Jake's avatar
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    ^^ Brings back great memories of teaching my two sons to ride a bicycle. Running along side them with my hand on the seat. Letting go. Watching them use the entire street to turn around.

    Teaching them to play catch and hit a baseball.

    Warm feelings. They better return my calls today.

    Oh, that reminds me. I'll find that picture of NeilJake after he fell off his skateboard and I'll post it. Ouch!


    edit: here it is. Happy go lucky kid.



    Damn near could be a caption contest image.....
    Last edited by Richmond Jake; 23 Jul 2006 at 10:54 AM.
    What would RJ do?

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I remember when my son stood by pulling himself up for the first time. He had been eyeing the coffee table and I could just see the chipmunks running on the wheel in his head. Next thing he does is grab the leg and pulls himself up. He had this amazed or shocked expression on his face and if he could have talked I'm sure he would have said "Wow!". Afterwards he got this big smile and he surveyed the room from his new vantage point from two feet above the floor.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister
    I remember when my son stood by pulling himself up for the first time. He had been eyeing the coffee table and I could just see the chipmunks running on the wheel in his head. Next thing he does is grab the leg and pulls himself up. He had this amazed or shocked expression on his face and if he could have talked I'm sure he would have said "Wow!". Afterwards he got this big smile and he surveyed the room from his new vantage point from two feet above the floor.
    His next will be when he starts to stack wood blocks!
    "I learned many great lessons from my father, not the least of which, was that you can fail at what you don't want, so you might as well take a chance on doing what you love." - Jim Carrey

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I really loved the day my son learned to dribble a basketball. He was 3 or 4, we were living with my mom, and we'd been working on it in Mom's kitchen. One day we were going for a walk and he wanted to bring the basketball and try it in the street. Ding! It worked, and every time we took a walk after that, he had to bring that ball along and dribble. It was soooo cute.

    The only epiphany I had as a kid was in middle school when I realized I was fat. School dance. It sucked. I went home that night and asked my mom to help me diet.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Hceux's avatar
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    One of the most striking childhood epiphanies that I ever had was the realization that I can actually graduate from elementary school, let alone high school or even university/college.

    It's hard to believe that one time in grade 5 I didn't think I had any hope to graduate from elementary school. Talk about the negative schooling environment that I was in!

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    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Learning about mortality and being alone and having to be self sufficient. I was 12.99 years old when my mom was injured in a bad work accident and had to have surgery on her spine. She almost died and had to spend 12 days in the hospital. I had to stay with the manager of the apartment complex sleeping on the couch because my own father wouldn't watch me for that long. I walked or rode my bike to the grocery store, learned how to cook, and took care of her while she recovered. I turned 13 a few days after she came home from the hospital. I bought a small cake, ordered a pizza, and invited my best friend over for the afternoon. Christmas came just two weeks after that and we had no money (my father convenviently petitioned the court to reduce his child support to $150 a month at that time). Someone we knew brought us a tree because my mom couldn't drive so soon after surgery. There was no money for gifts, I wrote her a letter telling her she was the best mom and it didn't matter because we were together. She wrote me one back. I found the one I gave her in her Bible after she died. She kept it for 16 years.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Big Owl's avatar
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    my almost 6 month old just found her feet within the last week so now she is on a mission to eat them.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian sisterceleste's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek
    Learning about mortality and being alone and having to be self sufficient. I was 12.99 years old when my mom was injured in a bad work accident and had to have surgery on her spine. She almost died and had to spend 12 days in the hospital. I had to stay with the manager of the apartment complex sleeping on the couch because my own father wouldn't watch me for that long. I walked or rode my bike to the grocery store, learned how to cook, and took care of her while she recovered. I turned 13 a few days after she came home from the hospital. I bought a small cake, ordered a pizza, and invited my best friend over for the afternoon. Christmas came just two weeks after that and we had no money (my father convenviently petitioned the court to reduce his child support to $150 a month at that time). Someone we knew brought us a tree because my mom couldn't drive so soon after surgery. There was no money for gifts, I wrote her a letter telling her she was the best mom and it didn't matter because we were together. She wrote me one back. I found the one I gave her in her Bible after she died. She kept it for 16 years.
    That is a very endearing story. My Mom died last January and I cleaned out my parents home in June for two weeks. I found things like love letters from my Dad to my Mom and other things that made me really miss my parents.
    You darn tootin', I like fig newtons!

  10. #10
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    I've harbored mild concerns that my boy was possibly color blind as he has demonstrated a surprising lack of ability to differentiate colors at age 2. We'd show him pictures of four different colored balloons and ask him to point to the red balloon...now point to the green balloon....which balloon he pointed to was seemingly random until last night. He had an epiphany where he comprehended the concept of color, now he always points to the right balloon.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  11. #11
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    When I learned that raw vegetables were more nutritious than cooked vegetables. Ha...I had science backing my dislike for cooked carrots.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

    Six seasons and a movie!

  12. #12
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    When I was in second grade I got out of school early one day a week to attend classes for my First Communion. I was going to a school that was all boys and the communion classes were held at a Catholic school that had boys and girls. In my communion class was the prettiest seven-year-old girl I had ever seen. She sat one row to my right and one seat behind. I noticed that if I looked at the TV mounted on the wall I could see her reflection.

    My epiphany was I discovered I really liked girls! Unfortunately, for my seven-year-old heart, she had absolutely no interest in me. More of a sad realization than an epiphany there. Cie la vie.

    Never experienced the stage where some boys find girls yucky. I pretty much thought girls, in general, were pretty great. As far as the proverbial cooties question, I figured if girls had cooties, I was okay with getting them too.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  13. #13
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I've harbored mild concerns that my boy was possibly color blind as he has demonstrated a surprising lack of ability to differentiate colors at age 2. We'd show him pictures of four different colored balloons and ask him to point to the red balloon...now point to the green balloon....which balloon he pointed to was seemingly random until last night. He had an epiphany where he comprehended the concept of color, now he always points to the right balloon.
    Maybe does not give a darn as to what color the balloon is. He just knows that he will not get a balloon, regardless of what color he picks. Or maybe there is something more sinister going on here. Maybe he realizes that you are being an over concerned parent who is in fear of the slightest potential learning setback and he is purposefully plotting and embarking on deliberate schemes that he knows will raise concern. I am sure that you will find that he fully documents all of this information with marker on the back of his dresser. He is doing this as a beginning stage and in the future he plans to expand Operation Loss of Sanity where your keys will start getting moved, or your coffee will be decaf, or the dog will be in the shower. Before long, he will be moving your car from the garage to the neighbor’s driveway, changing the time on your watch and clocks just long enough for you to see them before he sets them back to the correct time, and worst of all, rearranging furniture.

    His mental games are only starting... before long he will be in your head!
    "I learned many great lessons from my father, not the least of which, was that you can fail at what you don't want, so you might as well take a chance on doing what you love." - Jim Carrey

  14. #14
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    Maybe does not give a darn as to what color the balloon is. He just knows that he will not get a balloon, regardless of what color he picks. Or maybe there is something more sinister going on here. Maybe he realizes that you are being an over concerned parent who is in fear of the slightest potential learning setback and he is purposefully plotting and embarking on deliberate schemes that he knows will raise concern. I am sure that you will find that he fully documents all of this information with marker on the back of his dresser. He is doing this as a beginning stage and in the future he plans to expand Operation Loss of Sanity where your keys will start getting moved, or your coffee will be decaf, or the dog will be in the shower. Before long, he will be moving your car from the garage to the neighbor’s driveway, changing the time on your watch and clocks just long enough for you to see them before he sets them back to the correct time, and worst of all, rearranging furniture.

    His mental games are only starting... before long he will be in your head!
    Just wait until you have a kid.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  15. #15
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Speaking of young children. My favorite (or least favorite, depending on my mood), is when a child, usually sometime around a few months after turning a year old, realizes that when Daddy asks her to please come here and give me whatever she's holding, she really doesn't have to and instead runs away and tries to hide in the corner.

    It's actually pretty funny and cute. The first sign of stubbornness.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    I've harbored mild concerns that my boy was possibly color blind as he has demonstrated a surprising lack of ability to differentiate colors at age 2. We'd show him pictures of four different colored balloons and ask him to point to the red balloon...now point to the green balloon....which balloon he pointed to was seemingly random until last night. He had an epiphany where he comprehended the concept of color, now he always points to the right balloon.
    If you haven't figured it out yet, kids will do whatever they can to aggrivate the hell out of their parents!! My daughter did the same thing and I too was convinced that she was colorblind. Well, the little turd is fine and I am on to other worries!!

    I don't have one defining moment - every day with her is magical. Yes, even her meltdowns. I love her and appreciate her so much, but especially now as I don't see her every day. I have her 60% of the time, so probably 4-5 days a week, and I think she is just amazing!!
    Quote Originally posted by btrage
    It's actually pretty funny and cute. The first sign of stubbornness.
    Yah, myy daughters first sign was when she was in utero. Seriously, I swear she would stop moving on purpose for hours on end just to freak me out. She didnt' disappoint either - she has been, and continues to be, very stubborn and very independent. At least she comes by it naturally!

  17. #17
    Cyburbian Queen B's avatar
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    As a parent of grown adults the best thing that happens is that they grow up and suddenly their parents becaome smart again. Or you hear that you might have at least done a couple of things right. But don't expect to hear it from thier mouths, it usually comes from someone else that they love.
    It is all a matter of perspective!!!

  18. #18
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Queen B View post
    As a parent of grown adults the best thing that happens is that they grow up and suddenly their parents becaome smart again. Or you hear that you might have at least done a couple of things right. But don't expect to hear it from thier mouths, it usually comes from someone else that they love.
    So there is hope? I remember once when I was about 25 that my mom said "I like you a lot better now than 10 years ago."
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  19. #19
    Cyburbian craines's avatar
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    Hearing my oldest daugther naming a tree to her friend use the plant genus and species.

    Been teaching my youngest daughter how to swim and at first she was a bit apprhensive but as of yesterday swam her first full length and dived off the edge (something she did completely on her own). It was at that point that i realized everything else gravy and that those momemts are what it is about.

  20. #20
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Always hated (and still do) negotiating with car sales people but taught my oldest son to be a hardliner and not fall in love with a car until AFTER it's yours by doing all the negotiating for him on his 1st car while he was just a 17 year-old spectator. It almost killed him because he really wanted it. But he learned and actually enjoys making the deal. Now he's 35 and I just tell him what I want and what my bottom line is. I don't even go to the dealership until the deal is ready to close. Life is good.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ofos View post
    I don't even go to the dealership until the deal is ready to close. Life is good.
    Please, tell me your techniques.........

  22. #22
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    Please, tell me your techniques.........
    I'd tell you but then I'd have to...start another thread!

  23. #23
    Cyburbian DrumLineKid's avatar
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    Son #1 is 21y.o. and has been treating the Kids Mom and I OK. The Kid, however, hasn't received his brains back from the aliens. He has been an obnoxious SOB, pays little attention to me unless it is to tell me I've done something wrong and is totally disrespectful to his Mom. Any suggestions how I can force an epiphany? I thought about drilling into his head, but the battery on the drill went dead.


    DLK
    "There are people in every time and every land who want to stop history in its tracks. They fear the future, mistrust the present and invoke the security of a comfortable past which, in fact, never existed." RFK

  24. #24
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DrumLineKid View post
    Any suggestions how I can force an epiphany?
    Is the Kid still at home? My son's epiphany began with a hard boot out of the house into reality after dropping out of Party Hearty U. It still took a few years of life on his own and a divorce to realign the synapses. Sadly, that's not a whole lot different than my own life experience which took longer than his.

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