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Thread: Limiting second homes to control housing costs

  1. #26
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    slightly OT:

    Detroit - that was one of the arguments against regulating them - people that stay a week will shop locally for goods, spend more, less impact than a hotel - and it offers an option for travellers that are families (for me, having 3 kids, one still napping, so I am definitely in a house rental) - but that argument didn't go too far, unfortunately

  2. #27
    Cyburbian SGB's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by DetroitPlanner
    I can tell you that the County and the township love the owners of secondary properties. In Michigan these are deamed as non-homestead houses, and can be taxed at not only a higher taxable value, but a higher millage as well. In short, these are cash cows as I pay roughly double what a similar priced homestead property would in the property taxes that run the schools and many of the other services of the county. By limiting 2nd homes, you would curb sprawl, but you would also bite the hand that feeds you.
    While I haven't seen the studies myself, I've heard anecdotally that second homes are pretty much equivalent to light industrial lands in terms of their low net cost of community services.
    All these years the people said he’s actin’ like a kid.
    He did not know he could not fly, so he did.
    - - Guy Clark, "The Cape"

  3. #28
    Cyburbian
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    MRod305
    residents who want to buy a home have a right to afford that home BEFORE investors and out-of-towners have a right to buy a second home

    Well I would disagree with you on the right, not sure they should... Though I would not disagree with incentives to help raise home ownership. Many existing homeowners benefit from speculative buying and increased property values. Isn't that one way to measure how well a planning department is working? To me it is, if the community is well planned typically it will protect and even boost property values. So to me it is a double edged sword...

  4. #29
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jaws
    Newspapers are about the worst possible source of news for anything. You can find the latest on housing at http://thehousingbubbleblog.com/
    From a July 23 posting on this blog:
    "Most speculators have moved on to other housing markets like Boise, Idaho, and Albuquerque."

    Invasion of the property snatchers!
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday
    From a July 23 posting on this blog:
    "Most speculators have moved on to other housing markets like Boise, Idaho, and Albuquerque."

    Invasion of the property snatchers!
    ...who drive up the prices of homes for people who live there because that is where their from. My sentiments exactly! "Property snatchers"... I like it.

  6. #31
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    Do second home areas see prices increases? Sure, but in what manner is there a legal means to limit the second home market? They already pay higher mortgage rates then Owner Occupied and do not get Homestead exemptions (in FLA), so what is a local planning dept. able to do? Planning for affordable housing is one thing, but limiting the purchasing of housing to "locals only" is another... sounds a like the grounds for a 'Bubba Network', if you ask me.

    (PS. IMHO, if someone has the means and desire to buy a second, third or even fourth home, I think they have the right to do so. There are second homes in my family on the beach and on on a lake and I have enjoyed them very much, they have been the site of many family get togethers. I do not wish to give them up to O.O. residents at all... sorry).
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  7. #32
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by H

    (PS. IMHO, if someone has the means and desire to buy a second, third or even fourth home, I think they have the right to do so.

    I agree. But I think its unfortunate that some people have the means to buy second, third and fourth homes where many other people can't affoprd their own home and in many instances can barely even afford to rent a home.

    I was driven out of my home town where all my family lives because as a young professional starting out in the world I could barely even afford to pay the rent. As a result I now live a thousand miles away from my family.

  8. #33
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by imaplanner
    I agree. But I think its unfortunate that some people have the means to buy second, third and fourth homes where many other people can't affoprd their own home and in many instances can barely even afford to rent a home.
    I also agree with what you say, which is why I am pro 'affordable' and 'inclusionary' housing policies (opposed the the second home limitations).
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  9. #34
    Cyburbian
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    Shrugs.

    As much sympathy I may have for small town residents getting priced out due to an influx of second homeowners and investors who skyrocket local housing prices, let us not forget that probably for every resident who's priced out, there's another local resident making a fortune, whether from selling his house to out of towners or catering to the needs of the tourists. Additionally, the often higher property taxes paid by the second homeowners fund local government services and schools, which are not utilized by these homeowners who also can't vote in local elections.

    High housing prices isn't a particular phenomena to small resort towns. Many suburban counties and towns in the major metropolitan areas are also suffering from a lack of affordable housing largely through population growth (see California, the NY and Washington suburbs), yet I have yet to hear politicans and planners in, say, the Washington suburbs, advocate laws preventing new arrivals from buying houses.

    Despite the disparate diversity of beliefs and values in this country, a few key principles are generally agreed upon by most people and one of them is the right of a private homeowner to sell to whoever he or she wants. Planners and politicians can regulate the use of a property, but they can't regulate the right of a property owner to sell the said property at an X amount of money.

  10. #35
          bluehour's avatar
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    My two cents (Euros, really):

    In County Donegal, Ireland, the number of holiday homes became an issue in the 1990s. In the 2000 County Development Plan the Council required that each housing applicant demonstrate a "local housing need" when wanting to build outside of villages. This didn't work, and Holiday homes have continued to proliferate (both in villages and in the countryside).

    Now the Council is proposing (and should soon publish) a County Plan wherein each village is limited to 20% holidays homes, and if this threshold is past then most developers will be S.O.L. The Council is now also requiring those who get planning permission for a "local housing need" to sign a legally binding agreement that they will live in the house for 7 years before selling it on.

    A different perspective, for sure.

    I doubt that these new tactic will work; but hope that they do.

  11. #36

    Limiting 2nd homes

    It's primarily a money issue. Think for a moment how much those second homes contribute to tax revenues, without putting as much of a burden on services as a year-round resident. Think of the costs (savings) of NOT educating school-aged children.

    Talk to folks on Martha's Vineyard or Nantucket about the absurd amount of community facilities they have, that part-time residents pay for!

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