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Thread: What style of architecture is this?

  1. #1
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    What style of architecture is this?

    Can someone tell me what style of architecture is found on Acorn St. in Boston?
    I'm interested in finding a house similar to those elsewhere.

    I would provide an image, but the forum will only allow me to if I post 5 messages first.

  2. #2
    You can upload your image at http://imageshack.us and link to it.

  3. #3
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    The forum won't allow me to link images until I post 5 messages. If you google "acorn street, boston", you will get several photos of the buildings there.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Luca's avatar
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    If this is it

    http://www.ronsaari.com/stockImages/...cornStreet.php

    It is domestic Georgian architecture (British 18th/early 19th-century classical style used in average brick houses.

    Society Hill in Philly is full of this as is London (not always as pristine).

    It's a style you can sell to 99% of people anywhere. quite practical and sturdy.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Errrrr......

    CUBIST Maybe..............

    Looks good, kind of reminds me of some areas in Frederick Maryland......
    “The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community.”
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
    - See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-ph....r7W02j3S.dpuf

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    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Luca View post

    It's a style you can sell to 99% of people anywhere. quite practical and sturdy.
    Except traffic engineers and elected officials (at least in 90% of the metros in the U.S.). Talking of course about the daring urbanism.

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    Cyburbian Random Traffic Guy's avatar
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    Don't forget the fire chiefs.

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    Cyburbian Jess's avatar
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    Federal style??

    British influence " Federal style" town houses built in the late 1820's mostly made of red bricks. Prominent architect known for this is Cornelius Coolidge.
    Similar types of style are also found long Chestnut St. & Beacon St., but Acorn is the most picturesque.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Luca's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    Except traffic engineers and elected officials (at least in 90% of the metros in the U.S.). Talking of course about the daring urbanism.
    I'm sure you are right. But why would you let a traffic engineer decide what a city looks like? It's like letting plumber decide how your bathroom should look...

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I am finding myself mostly agreeing with Jess, in saying that it is Federal style. The fan light over the door and the twelve-over-twelve window lights are some characteristics of this. It is also fair to say that there is a mix of styes, with the Greek Revival pediment as an example. It would be much easier to make an assessment if we could see more of the facades. Unfortunately, the narrow passage prevents this. The buildings on one side or the other might be knocked down to improve sight lines and circulation.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
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    I also have heard it called Federal style. The Beacon Hill area of Boston is full of streets and buildings like that.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Jess View post
    British influence " Federal style" town houses built in the late 1820's mostly made of red bricks. Prominent architect known for this is Cornelius Coolidge.
    Similar types of style are also found long Chestnut St. & Beacon St., but Acorn is the most picturesque.
    And, in fact, the buildings on Acorn Street were designed by Cornelius Coolidge himself, according to WalkBoston (PDF link):

    Acorn Street – late 1820s. Perhaps Boston’s most picturesque appearance. Modest red brick Federal style town houses designed by Cornelius Coolidge for shopkeepers, artisans and the like border narrow, cobblestone-paved way. On the north side of the street are brick walls that enclose some of the “Hidden Gardens of Beacon Hill.”

  13. #13
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Luca View post
    I'm sure you are right. But why would you let a traffic engineer decide what a city looks like? It's like letting plumber decide how your bathroom should look...
    Unfortunately planning for land use/urban design and transportation tend to take place in separate universes. In most local governments (albeit in generally less progressive zip codes) the traffic engineer is seen as the only legitimate expert on transportation.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Luca's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    Unfortunately planning for land use/urban design and transportation tend to take place in separate universes. In most local governments (albeit in generally less progressive zip codes) the traffic engineer is seen as the only legitimate expert on transportation.
    He is. What I'm saying is that, as with any expert, you tell them the outcome you want and they set it up for you. If your desired otucome is "cars driving unhindered at highway speeds while manitaning some safety" then they will strike down a quaint old lane and build limited-access thruways. If you tell them the desired outcome is "traffic able to move at no less than 5-15 MPH (ona verage) and safe at that speed but only subject to pedestrian requiremens" they will produce a different set of guidelines, presumably.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Luca View post
    He is. What I'm saying is that, as with any expert, you tell them the outcome you want and they set it up for you. If your desired otucome is "cars driving unhindered at highway speeds while manitaning some safety" then they will strike down a quaint old lane and build limited-access thruways. If you tell them the desired outcome is "traffic able to move at no less than 5-15 MPH (ona verage) and safe at that speed but only subject to pedestrian requiremens" they will produce a different set of guidelines, presumably.
    I completely agree. But it is always easier politically to widen roads than follow plans. It certainly not cheaper and results in crappy development but it is the path of least resistance for City Hall.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    I completely agree. But it is always easier politically to widen roads than follow plans. It certainly not cheaper and results in crappy development but it is the path of least resistance for City Hall.
    Just dropping in to remind everyone that if they actually had to pay for the consequences of these decisions, they would make the economically sensible decisions instead of the politically convenient ones.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally posted by Luca View post
    I'm sure you are right. But why would you let a traffic engineer decide what a city looks like? It's like letting plumber decide how your bathroom should look...
    Excellent point, Luca.

    I think that is why most American cities look, on the outside, like plumbing networks that should be hidden behind the walls or underground.

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