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Thread: Notification requirements for boards, commissions, and hearings.

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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Notification requirements for boards, commissions, and hearings.

    When/if you send out mailed notices who do they go to? Is it just the property owner or the tenet? More so, what about multi tenet buildings such as apartments, duplexes, malls, office complexes and such with a set distance from the property in question? More so is it all the buildings and occupants within that zoning lot or property, or is it just those occupants whose specific location is within that set distance. (Such as only half the mall would be notified for some things?

    We are discussing the new requirements and trying better to understand who and how to notices some of these places, but wondering what everyone else does.
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    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Back when I was in the public sector, we did it this way:

    1) Mailed to owner of record, and stated in the ordinance that the owner of record info comes from the appraisal district/taxing authority - for both business and residential. In the case of a mall, it's the owner. With a strip center with several owner, then each had to be notified
    2) for condos: mailed to the condo's association ie homeowners group
    3) apartments: mailed to owner AND to tenants (waste of time, in my book - In the 2 years I was in charge of this, we didn't have any apartment dwellers come in)
    4) if a Homeowners Association was listed with the city for the area under notice, then we had to send one letter there. It was the HOA's responsibility to set up and update their info with the city

    Of course, this was all in addition to the signs on the property and the notice in the paper.
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    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    we only notify owners as shown in the most recent tax records - for condo's, notice will go to each condo owner -

    but no, we don't notify tenants on public hearings, we have no tracking here of businesses or renters of dwellings and our turnover is pretty high

    when I am doing a workshop on downtown issues, I do a door to door drop off of the notice with a personal hello and a verbal request to come - but that's just what I do because I am seeking input on an issue in their area, not because of an ordinance requirement

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    Cyburbian btrage's avatar
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    In the State of Michigan, taking into consideration the new Zoning Enabling Act of 2006, the rules are as follows:

    1. A notice of public hearing must be published only once, at least 15 days prior to the date of the public hearing (the old rules in Michigan were much more confusing). This applies to rezonings, special land use approval, PUDs, and the ZBA.

    2. For applications involving the rezoning of 10 or fewer adjacent parcels; for ZBA applications involving a specific parcel; and for all PUDs and special land uses, the notice must be mailed or personally delivered to the following persons at least 15 days before the public hearing:

    a. The applicant
    b. All persons to whom real property is assessed within 300 feet of the subject parcel
    c. The occupants of all structures within 300 feet of the subject parcel

    Notice must be provided outside of a municipalities boundaries.

    For actions involving 11 or more parcels, no mailings are required.

    For mulit-unit buildings, the new Zoning Enabling Act is somewhat vague. Our attorney has directed us to continue as under the former Act, which allows for the notice to be posted when there are 4 or more units in a building.
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    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by btrage View post
    For mulit-unit buildings, the new Zoning Enabling Act is somewhat vague.
    That is the issue that we are in right now. The rest of it we have down no problem.
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