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Poll results: Which city?

Voters
19. You may not vote on this poll
  • DENVER

    13 68.42%
  • SALT LAKE CITY

    1 5.26%
  • None of the above

    4 21.05%
  • These Cities Would be Best Compared with... (your opinion below)

    1 5.26%
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Thread: Trying my hand: Denver versus Salt Lake City

  1. #1
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Trying my hand: Denver versus Salt Lake City

    Well, I wanted to get some opions on this. Mainly for thoughts on my home city (and old friend) Denver, but I wanted a comparison.

    I chose Denver and Salt Lake City because they are two western State Capitals and are up against the mountains. The size and demographics are different, I know, but thought these two would be a good comparison.

    I will withhold my opinions (biased as they may be) until some reponses for this thread are compiled.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  2. #2
    Cyburbian dobopoq's avatar
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    Zman, what are you asking us to vote on? Which city - What? Which we prefer and like more, or something else?
    "The current American way of life is founded not just on motor transportation but on the religion of the motorcar, and the sacrifices that people are prepared to make for this religion stand outside the realm of rational criticism." -Lewis Mumford

  3. #3
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dobopoq View post
    Zman, what are you asking us to vote on? Which city - What? Which we prefer and like more, or something else?
    Which one you'd prefer. Preference could be a myriad of issues like living or visiting, climate, people, things you heard. Just what your preference or opinion would be.

    Thanks for the help, this is my first time trying these.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus
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    I like both of them, but I voted for Denver because I had lived/went to school there 88-92.










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    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
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  5. #5
    Cyburbian gicarto's avatar
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    I want to go on vacation to Denver sometime in the next couple of years.
    Trying to get my grubby hands on as much stimulus money as I can.:D

  6. #6
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Well.....

    Denver, because I'm more familiar with the City. I have spent some time in Salt Lake (Winter Olympics and visiting relatives.....yes, the one has relatives in Utah....several now in fact..... ) Salt Lake seems to be a VERY nice place and I would not hesitate to live there, or in Utah for that matter.....a state with great natural beauty I think the "church" was wise not to overtly proselytize during the Olympics (at least I didn't see any of it). I think if I were to live anywhere in Utah, Salt Lake would be the most "comfortable" place (assuming I don't win the lottery and could live at one of the ski areas ).
    Skilled Adoxographer

  7. #7
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
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    Never been to either place. I won't comment based on heresay.
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  8. #8
    Cyburbian
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    I really like Denver. In terms of development and land planning overall, I think it beats SLC hands down. I love the downtown area in Denver. it puts SLC to shame. I REALLY like the fact that the citizens of Denver and the vicinity made it pretty clear that they think expanded transit options are necessary and voted to spead up the construction of it. I like the Pearl St. neighborhood just north and west of University of Denver (Is it called the Pearl District?). Jerusalem Cafe kicks ass. I have considered on many occassions moving to Denver.

    But,

    SLC has two major personal factors for me. The biggest is family. While I do have some cousins in the Denver area, our immediate families live in SLC. With two young kids and lots of cousins and friends with kids their age, the pull to stay is very large. The proximity to the mountains is also very important to me. The mountians in Denver are just a little too far away. My neighborhood is ideal, very walkable, great neighbors, very little "church" influence, close to a bus that goes directly to the light rail line, close to the University of Utah, a great schools, etc. Plus we have what, a million less residents?

    If I took out the personal reasons, and zoomed out from my own personal bias on the two places, I think Denver has a lot more going for it, but SLC is certainly making strides in that same direction (not the suburbs though, the suburbs in SLC suck ass). I think I have to vote for SLC because that is where I live.
    Last edited by cololi; 03 Nov 2006 at 12:38 PM.

  9. #9
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    I vote for Denver, though I have never been to either city, and I don't mind voting on hearsay alone.

    I give Denver the thumbs-up simply because of the pictures I've seen of the Stapleton redevelopment.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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  10. #10

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    It's Denver By a Landslide!

    Speaking strictly from the aspect of "enlightened self interest" it's the Mile High City. Have you ever tried to score a decent beer or even a legitimate cup of coffee in SLC? Virtually impossible....

  11. #11
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Miles Ignatius View post
    Speaking strictly from the aspect of "enlightened self interest" it's the Mile High City. Have you ever tried to score a decent beer or even a legitimate cup of coffee in SLC? Virtually impossible....
    Easy now. You just have to have a phd in "Identifing the righteous, worthless legislation and gtinget around it". It is offered at the University of Utah. No question our liquor laws are irritating, confusing, and not visitor friendly. Try living with them every day. I don't mind the hard liquor rules, but the 3.2 beer (except at state owned liquor stores) and not being able to buy a bottle of wine in the grocery store gets to me, or being able to bring it in from out of state. Our local breweries win a decent amount of awards at the GABF every year, so it can't be that bad.

    Coffee, cmon, we have some great locally owned coffee shops with very talented baristas who can serve up the joe. I'm not talking the starbucks that are on every corner either.

  12. #12

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    So Noted!

    Cololi: Indeed - I've had Wastach's superb "Polygamy Porter" which shows that the Beehive State can generate some mighty fine beer in addition to having a sense of humor!

    My comment harkens back to a frustrating experience while on a business trip to West Valley a few years ago. On a weekday evening, I must have driven for miles looking for beer and coffee but to no avail.

    Next time, I'll be better prepared with information in advance - like knowing Wasatch's brewpub south of downtown isn't open during the evenings....

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    If given the choice between Denver and Salt Lake, I would choose Albuquerque.

    There are many ways these communities are similar. Physical setting is one (generally). Denver, I think, does offer quicker access to more appealing mountain settings.Neither is a particularly friendly place, and the planning communities in each tend to be overly egotistical. This last comment applies to the private sector (planners, architects, developers) and to about half of the communities. Get away from the metro areas and ski towns and these people tend to become more down to earth. Both places are also expensive, and while the urban environment is good, it falls far short of the character you will find in older cities to the east.

    ALbuquerque is a place where anyone can feel that they can come in and get comfortable. It is an inexpensive place to live, and the city has plenty of character. Its one drawback is the distance to any really great scenery, but two hours still puts you in the mountains.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  14. #14
    Cyburbian
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    Hard to answer, and therefore a good question for comparison.

    From a professional perspective, denver. there's stapleton, there's downtown, there's the wynkoop area...

    from a recreational perspective, salt lake. the skiing is incredible! the desert is incredible! the mountains are incredible!

    from a personal perspective, denver. i could never, ever, ever, ever, live in a city where, as the joke goes, separation between church and state is only one block. I never realized how pervasive the mormon thing is until i spent time in salt lake. no way, no how.

    I suppose i'd have to go with denver, though i'd rather pick seattle. Or, even closer to denver, fort collins.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by vaughan View post
    I suppose i'd have to go with denver, though i'd rather pick seattle. Or, even closer to denver, fort collins.
    Fort Collins, eh? Interesting. As I have lived near Fort Collins for almost 7 years now, I have actually become quite clastrophobic in big cities. I may now choose Fort Collins over Denver too..
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  16. #16
         
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    I have been to Denver and have driven through SLC. I went to 6 FLags in Denver, strange place to me, its in the middle of the City, 6 Flags here in Missouri is way out in the middle of nowhere. There wasn't a whole lot particularly appealing about either city in my opinion.
    Z - I really did like Fort Collins and Loveland. Both were very nice and much cleaner than I remember Denver being.

  17. #17
    I just returned from a weekend in Denver. It was my first time in Colorado. As I recently moved to Portland, OR, I was interested to check out another medium-sized city.

    A caveat: the impressions that follow are based on a single weekend spent in Colorado and one afternoon Downtown, so they are superficial at best.

    The civic building area, with the park in-between the capitol, courthouse(?), public library, art museum, et al, is very nice, and I enjoyed walking around there. But as we made our way toward the 16th street mall, I noticed that the downtown was dominated mostly by office buildings, and therefore was desolate due to lack of both an interesting street wall and people on a Sunday afternoon. Perhaps I wasn't passing through the right part of town; I did see an area that seemed to be inhabited by several cafés and bars when we were driving around in search of a parking spot.

    The 16th street mall was quite nice, as were the free buses running through it. I appreciated the fact that Denver seemed to be taking steps to curb panhandling, as that is a big problem in Portland. The planning seemed to leave a little to be desired. One interior mall walkway lead out onto a busy street with no crosswalk, even though the walkway continued on the opposite side.

    The areas around Denver (I was staying with friends in Aurora) exhibited freakish sprawl and big box stores popping up to an extent that I have never seen. One can see a long way out on the Colorado prairie: all the better to see a crowded and uninterrupted sea of rooftops.

    As we were leaving downtown, we drove through a very nice residental neighborhood, with a mix of modest-looking apartment buildings and older victorian homes. I wish I knew what the area was called or where it was, but I was doing more sightseeing than navigating.

    The architecture in Denver seemed hodgepodgey to me. While there were some handsome structures (and some not), it appeared that many of the office buildings had been designed to be monumental, without much regard for the style of the surrounding buildings.

    Overall, my Denver experience was pleasant, but it made me long for my new home in Portland. (I cannot comment on SLC, as I have never been there.)

  18. #18
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Alaithea View post
    Overall, my Denver experience was pleasant, but it made me long for my new home in Portland. (I cannot comment on SLC, as I have never been there.)
    Interesting, despite Portland being a mecca for lots of Planning Ideals, I longed for Denver while having a pleasant experience in Portland. Must be my own opinions.

    Good perspective though, and I always like hearing impressions of my hometown from others.

    A note on the architecture: As Denver and Colorado's Front Range is made up of a hodgepodge of people, it has been hard to pin down a "typical" architecture to follow, especially when trying to establish guidelines in a zoning code.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  19. #19
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN View post
    I always like hearing impressions of my hometown from others.
    I agree. I find it interesting to see how people develop a perception (either good or bad) of a place that they have spent little if any time in.

  20. #20
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    Having spent minimal time in Denver and being very familiar with Salt Lake, I think I'd say Denver because its a little more urban, and Salt Lake just seems like suburbia to me. (That's Salt Lake proper, the real suburbs are sooo bad, but so is Highlands Ranch) Still, Salt Lake has a lot of nice things going for it, the scenery is awesome, its close to lots of pretty things to look at and fun recreational things to do. Rocky Anderson, I think, has done a whole bunch of good for the city and its gonna be a shame to see him leave. The downtown area is improving a lot, I think, but still there's really not a whole lot there. (The temple is the biggest deal there, and you really can't do anything there anyways.) Salt Lake has some nice residential areas, but what SLC really has going for it is the people (and I don't mean just the Mormons). I feel comfortable everywhere there, but somehow I'd still say Denver. I didn't see much of it, but what I did see I liked better.

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