Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Metal roofs

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    21,633

    Metal roofs

    Seems like we're seeing a definite uptick lately in roof replacements using galvanized steel. I figured this day and age no one would want a 'tin roof'. I mean, they're supposed to be noisy, comparatively expensive, and hot. Have steel prices dropped significantly in recent years? Is this perhaps something limited to the very local and what I'm seeing is the work of a skilled marketer? Has anyone else noticed any modest increases in metal roofs in their areas?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  2. #2
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    7,188
    I don't work with permits or anything like that so I don't have any hard numbers to cite, however I've definitely seen more houses with metal roofs in my area over the past few years, both remodels and new construction. I like the looks of them quite a bit, especially on smaller bungalows or farm-house style homes. There's a section of townhouses in our downtown that have metal roofs on them as well and they look pretty good. While the initial cost would be more expensive, I've got to imagine that they last longer and there is less maintenance.

    Having spent many hours in barns with metal roofs when I was a kid, I don't think they are nearly as noisy in the rain as a lot of people would expect that they are. Add in whatever attic insulation and sound dampening a house might have (compared to a drafty old barn that probably has nothing) and I doubt you would even notice the noise.

    The heat is a different matter though - they would definitely trap the heat inside in the summer so I would imagine homes with metal roofs must have some increased attic ventilation.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

  3. #3
    Cyburbian MD Planner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2002
    Location
    On the corner of Walk and Don't Walk
    Posts
    1,005
    Actually metal roofs generally can keep a house cooler than asphalt shingles even though it may seem counter intuitive. With proper insulation they also do well in winter helping to keep the house warm. The savings in the summer can be significant. They aren't nearly as noisy as people think they are. Keep in mind, it's not the same as a tin roof on a barn during a rainstorm. You may hear more noise during a heavy rainstorm but again, it's not like you're standing in a metal shed either. The cost can be almost double what you'd pay for asphalt but the odds of you ever replacing your roof in your lifetime are slim. There are even some tax credits and rebates for metal roofs right now as well. Plus it just can give your home a very distinctive look. Here where I work we have the largest historic district in the state and we see a lot of new metal roofs being installed to replace metal ones that are over 100 years old.
    He's a planner, he's a dreamer, he's a sordid little schemer,
    Seems to think that money grows on trees . . .

  4. #4
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Somewhere between the mountains and the ocean.
    Posts
    16,585
    I have learned that they are all the rage down here in the south. They are expensive but they can last forever. However, not all metal roofs are the same. The simple corrugated tin roofs that you see are not the same quality as a standing seam metal roof. The thickness of the metal is also a major factor in longevity.

    Depending on the color of the roof, they do result in cooler temps as the metal can reflect more heat than the asphalt shingles can (or so I have been told by a local architect). They also can powder coat them resulting in an extremely durable material that isn't as loud during storms and can extend the life of the roof to as much as 100 - 150 years.

    A new development near my apartment just ripped down a old farmhouse that was abandoned back in the 70's. The developer does a lot of work in the town I work for so I asked him about the house and why they could not save it. He said that the foundation beams were rotting from termite damage, however one of the contractors did save the wood from the 2nd floor and the metal roof because it was as tight as the day it was installed. He thinks the house was built some where around 1850.
    The most foolish thing one can do this fall is to vote for Clinton or Trump. Wake up, get out of the matrix, and send a message to the political establishment that you won't play their game.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Down by Dun Ringill
    Posts
    6,658
    Blog entries
    6
    Metal roofs can be a regional thing, too. The Acadian style house (seen in south Louisiana) traditionally has a high pitch, metal roof. I grew up in a toney subdivision that had a very active HOA and Architecture Controls Committee. It created a bit of a fervor when someone wanted to build an Acadian style house in the subdivision. Metal roofs were considered something black people and Cajuns did. But once it was up and people got used to it, it was fine and actually one of the nicer looking houses in the subdivision.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  6. #6
    Cyburbian WSU MUP Student's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Lowering the PCI in the Hills
    Posts
    7,188
    There are a few massive Tudor and colonial homes near me that were built in the 1910s and 1920s that have copper roofs. There are also a couple smaller very cool looking mid-century homes with copper roofs in the area. Many of the buildings on the campus of the Cranbrook Academy also have copper roofs, including (I believe) the Eli Saarinen house which is now part of the architecture school.

    I cannot even imagine what it would cost to put a copper roof on a house these days.
    "Where free unions and collective bargaining are forbidden, freedom is lost." - 1980 Republican presidential candidate Ronald Reagan

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 4
    Last post: 26 Mar 2009, 8:05 PM
  2. The use of metal buildings...
    Design, Space, and Place
    Replies: 14
    Last post: 10 Nov 2005, 12:43 AM
  3. Replies: 4
    Last post: 16 Feb 2005, 10:28 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last post: 08 Dec 1999, 3:56 PM