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Thread: Go to a different university for graduate school?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Go to a different university for graduate school?

    Why do so many people say that you should go to a different university for graduate school? I don't see why it is so necessary.
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Plus
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    In my case it was that grad school had a planning degree, had in-state tuition, and other factors.
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  3. #3
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Hmmm....

    If you seek a PhD, consider mixing it up a bit......Having the same professors for two or three degrees would get old......I think.....plus, the academic world most likely has a stigma attached to staying at the same school....ask H (Who to this day I'm bummed that I didn't get to meet in St. Aug. ) Smaller schools would have the same professors teaching the same classes only with a higher level number attached.....example, while in undergrad, my advisor taught Quant. Geog. to undergrads and grads, often in the same class, the diference being that undergrads could view the equations during exams, grad students had to memorize them all (I had to do this in methods 1 at a different school) Going to a different university could only add credibility to your degrees I would think..... Don't some universities only have a PhD program (officially?) while others have terminal Masters degrees?
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  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus Salmissra's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNA View post
    In my case it was that grad school had a planning degree, had in-state tuition, and other factors.
    Ditto. I didn't have to move, and could keep my job.
    "We do not need any other Tutankhamun's tomb with all its treasures. We need context. We need understanding. We need knowledge of historical events to tie them together. We don't know much. Of course we know a lot, but it is context that's missing, not treasures." - Werner Herzog, in Archaeology, March/April 2011

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    I think that, in many cases, the real issue is whether your undergraduate institution has an appropriate graduate-level program for what you want to study.

    In addition, as The One mentioned, going to another school exposes you to different professors, different perspectives, and to a different school culture. Having a broader range of experiences can only help you later.

  6. #6
         
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    Yep, I think difference schools is important to see different perspectives. Economics provides a good example. Two of the leading schools of Economics, UChicago and UCBerkley are so different that they have different names of the type of econ they practice (Saltwater and Freshwater, litterally, this was in my Intro to Econ Book) and those thoughts are generally shared by those schools around them

  7. #7
    Hey, if you don't wanna do it, don't do it. I'd jump at the opportunity of moving. I wish I could go to a different school every year.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian RubberStamp Man's avatar
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    I agree with the other postings - go to a different school for each degree - broader range of education and life perspectives, particularly if you have to live in a new town - one aspect I would consider important in the field of urban planning, having travelled and lived in different settings. Academically if you go on to your PhD it is usually preferred if you went to a different school.

  9. #9
    I don't think this applies only to grad school, but I think everybody should get out and explore something new every once in a while.

    As it relates to grad school, you really want a different perspective on things. Professors have been studying the same thing for their whole academic career, they are more or less stuck into a particular mindset. Learning from different people let's you see things in a new perspective, and you'll probably learn more that way too.

    Travelling abroad isn't 'necessary' nor is education either, but both of them definitely have their benefits in life, and we should learn from them.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Ok, what if you are kind of tied to your current city at the moment and your other choices are not as good of schools for what you're wanting to do?
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  11. #11
    Classic cost-benefit analysis I suppose?

    Whichever option wins out in the end -- just make sure you take everything into account, like the suggested mentioned in above posts (and more below possibly..!).

  12. #12
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by The One View post
    If you seek a PhD, consider mixing it up a bit......Having the same professors for two or three degrees would get old......I think.....plus, the academic world most likely has a stigma attached to staying at the same school....ask H (Who to this day I'm bummed that I didn't get to meet in St. Aug. ) Smaller schools would have the same professors teaching the same classes only with a higher level number attached.....example, while in undergrad, my advisor taught Quant. Geog. to undergrads and grads, often in the same class, the diference being that undergrads could view the equations during exams, grad students had to memorize them all (I had to do this in methods 1 at a different school) Going to a different university could only add credibility to your degrees I would think..... Don't some universities only have a PhD program (officially?) while others have terminal Masters degrees?

    Agreed on all accounts ... including not meeting in St. Aug.

    Seriously, there are only so many classes and so many teachers, if you stay in the same school you hear the same angles over and over, moving around mixes up the ‘pot o knowledge’ and thus makes you more well rounded, as well as keeping you more invigorated.
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  13. #13
    Cyburbian RubberStamp Man's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jread View post
    Ok, what if you are kind of tied to your current city at the moment and your other choices are not as good of schools for what you're wanting to do?
    Well then it seems the more important question is whether you can relocate or not. Not sure how you would determine what schools are better than others, but if you can relocate and you find your choices limited then apply to those schools you feel are more in line with what you want.

  14. #14
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    discover the world

    I was able to see the world through going to school: Michigan, The Netherlands, Ottawa, and Calgary. Talk about learning about different planning techniques!!! Expose yourself to as many different urban and rural planning forms as you can. Plus, once you get to the Masters level you are steering your degree anyways.
    Good luck in your choice.

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