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    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Thanksgiving for a newbie

    I'm going to my first ever Thanksgiving celebration at my friend's place this week (she's from Kansas). Thanksgiving is not traditionally celebrated here. She doesn't want us to bring anything, but I'd like to if there is something little (and traditional) that I could take, maybe to remind her (and my other friend from Virginia) of home. Any ideas?? What are traditional foods for Thanksgiving?

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    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes w/ marshmallows, durkin greenbean casserole


    mmmmmm. i can't wait for thanksgiving!!
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    You can’t go wrong with Wine and a nice pumpkin pie with whipped cream!
    Not my monkey, not my circus. - Old Polish Proverb

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    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    You can’t go wrong with Wine and a nice pumpkin pie with whipped cream!
    Oooh I can make that! I have a great recipe. And from scratch too, none of this canned pumpkin stuff!

  5. #5
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    Your Virginia friend might appreciate either a pecan, or a sweet potato pie. That is if you can get either pecans or fresh sweet potatoes in New Zealand this time of year. If not, a nice wine to complement the turkey would be thoughtful.

    Just remember, turkey might be main course but the meal is truly all about the sides. So load up on the casseroles, mashed potatoes and stuffing. Those will be the first things to go.

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Great minds have pondered this very question . You can read all about it here
    http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showt...nksgiving+poll
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  7. #7
    make some chex mix. That's a great snack/appetizer.
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  8. #8
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Great minds have pondered this very question . You can read all about it here
    http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showt...nksgiving+poll
    Thanks, that is helpful.

    Oh wow, this sounds yum! Thanksgiving at zman's sounds like the place to be:
    -regular turkey in the oven (for authentic gravy)
    -smoked turkey with Grand Marinier glaze (fun to start drinking that in the morning, smoked all day long)
    -cornbread (southern, not yankee cornbread) and sage dressing
    -southwestern, spicy dressing (with southern cornbread)
    -real cranberries
    -mashed potatoes (now that a beautiful girl from Idaho attends dinner )
    -green beans
    -Hungarian sausage, rice, and sauerkraut casserole
    -pumpkin, cherry, and lemon pies
    Quote Originally posted by ssnyderjr View post
    make some chex mix. That's a great snack/appetizer.
    What is this chex mix you speak of?
    Last edited by Maister; 21 Nov 2006 at 3:22 PM. Reason: merged posts

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    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ssnyderjr View post
    make some chex mix. That's a great snack/appetizer.
    Chex mix and Durkee green bean casserole? Marshmallows? Whipped cream on pumpkin pie?

    Thanksgiving is supposed to be about tradition and making things from scratch (at least once per year).

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jmello View post
    Chex mix and Durkee green bean casserole? Marshmallows? Whipped cream on pumpkin pie?

    Thanksgiving is supposed to be about tradition and making things from scratch (at least once per year).
    yes, but durkee green bean casserole is one of those things, like canned cranberry jelly, that becomes a family tradition. we don't do the green bean casserole but that cranberry jelly is a MUST.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNL View post
    Thanks, that is helpful.
    Oh wow, this sounds yum! Thanksgiving at zman's sounds like the place to be:
    Gee thanks JNL. You're welcome anytime.
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  12. #12
    Quote Originally posted by jmello View post
    Chex mix and Durkee green bean casserole? Marshmallows? Whipped cream on pumpkin pie?

    Thanksgiving is supposed to be about tradition and making things from scratch (at least once per year).
    OK JMello (as witnessed at age 8), we'll start from scratch - Go into the coop in the back yard and grab two of the chickens. Lay them over a wooden block, and have your uncle chop their heads off and watch them run and fly around for the next 2 minutes. Once they are done convulsing, grab the carcas and pluck its feathers, they pull hard, so you may want to use plyers. Next you will want to take out the innards. The best way to approach this is to enter thru the 5-hole (hockey term). Once you have all that out, it is good to rinse out the inside of the bird. Then you insert the dried bread crumbs, sage, celery, seasoning, etc. into the bird's new cavity. Bake at 350 for an hour (like everything). NOW THERE"S TRADITION.

    Or you could go to my Uncle's in Missouri where we actually hunted down our (wild) turkey that year. My aunt deep fried it with shake and bake - yum yum. Do you want the details of that "tradition" too?
    Who's gonna re-invent the wheel today?

  13. #13
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by dandy_warhol View post
    yes, but durkee green bean casserole is one of those things, like canned cranberry jelly, that becomes a family tradition. we don't do the green bean casserole but that cranberry jelly is a MUST.
    We make the candied cranberries from scratch and do green beans and bacon instead of the casserole.

    Quote Originally posted by ssnyderjr
    Or you could go to my Uncle's in Missouri where we actually hunted down our (wild) turkey that year. My aunt deep fried it with shake and bake - yum yum. Do you want the details of that "tradition" too?
    Yeah! I plan to hunt and prep my own turkey one day. I just have to convince the wife.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Trail Nazi's avatar
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    Martha Stewart's website and allrecipes.com has great ideas for traditional Thanksgiving sides. For some areas of the country, there are different types of traditional side dishes. In the South, we love anything sweet - so sweet potatoes (with tons of brown sugar) usually topped with marshmallows is a great way to go. Also, the way the green beans are prepared - casserole or with ham, whatever, can vary.

    Have fun at your first feast. They are really fun and a great way to pack on a few extra pounds.

  15. #15
    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Trail Nazi View post
    In the South, we love anything sweet - so sweet potatoes (with tons of brown sugar) usually topped with marshmallows is a great way to go. Also, the way the green beans are prepared - casserole or with ham, whatever, can vary.
    i was watching America's Test Kitchen on PBS this past weekend and they were doing Thanksgiving dishes and one of the recipes was for Pecan Candied Sweet Potatoes. they said that the candied pecans were a nice change from the marshmallows, plus the crunchy texture was a nice contrast to the mushy sweet potatoes. it looked delicious!! you can get that recipe, and others, on their site.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNL View post
    I'm going to my first ever Thanksgiving celebration at my friend's place this week (she's from Kansas).
    From where in Kansas. Odds are I'm related to her.
    "And all this terrible change had come about because he had ceased to believe himself and had taken to believing others. " - Leo Tolstoy

  17. #17
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
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    Every year I make Sweet Potato Casserole, which is basically mashed sweet potatoes (w/ egg, butter, etc) with a crunchy topping of brown sugar, flour, butter and pecans. YUM!!

    Also, my family used to make this sweet potato thing. Not sure where it came from?? You take cooked sweet potatoes (canned if your not a purist like jmello ) and mash them with pineapple juice. Lay the pineapple rings on a cookie sheet and place a scoop of the sweet potato/pineapple mixture on top of each ring, and then put a marshmallow on top of each of them and bake it. They are so yummy!

  18. #18
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Budgie View post
    Odds are I'm related to her.
    Off-topic:
    Heyyyyy......waitaminute! I just realized something. Budgie, is there some particular reason you chose to play the banjo as a musical instrument?

    I believe these boys are related.
    Plunksville isn't in Kansas by any chance is it?
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ssnyderjr View post
    OK JMello (as witnessed at age 8), we'll start from scratch - Go into the coop in the back yard and grab two of the chickens. Lay them over a wooden block, and have your uncle chop their heads off and watch them run and fly around for the next 2 minutes. Once they are done convulsing, grab the carcas and pluck its feathers, they pull hard, so you may want to use plyers. Next you will want to take out the innards. The best way to approach this is to enter thru the 5-hole (hockey term). Once you have all that out, it is good to rinse out the inside of the bird. Then you insert the dried bread crumbs, sage, celery, seasoning, etc. into the bird's new cavity. Bake at 350 for an hour (like everything). NOW THERE"S TRADITION.
    But be careful not to burst the stomach when removing the innards! - the juices will ruin everything. And save the gizzards and liver - grandpa's favorite. Once you have the big feathers off, you can also pour boiling water on the skin. It makes the skin tense up and the small feathers easier to remove. If you're lucky, the nerves will still be active and it will jump a bit...

    I also recommend a good sweet potato or squash pie - my favorite, and an interesting alternative to pumpkin.
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  20. #20
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNL View post
    I'm going to my first ever Thanksgiving celebration at my friend's place this week (she's from Kansas). Thanksgiving is not traditionally celebrated here. She doesn't want us to bring anything, but I'd like to if there is something little (and traditional) that I could take, maybe to remind her (and my other friend from Virginia) of home. Any ideas?? What are traditional foods for Thanksgiving?
    Off-topic:
    Didn't you ask this same question last year? Or am I thinking of someone else? Why do I have this strange feeling of déjà vu?
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  21. #21
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Rumpy has a long memory.

    Quote Originally posted by Rumpy Tunanator View post
    Off-topic:
    Didn't you ask this same question last year? Or am I thinking of someone else? Why do I have this strange feeling of déjà vu?
    Off-topic:
    I had to do a search after you said that! You planted a seed of déjà vu in my head... but I can't find anything except a post of mine in the thread 'Your holiday menu' last year, where I discussed what I was serving for Christmas dinner. I'm pretty darn sure I've never been to a Thanksgiving meal with turkey and all the trimmings! Can't wait


    Since posting this morning, my offer to make pumpkin pie has been greatfully accepted by the host... better make sure it's a good one!

    And Banj... I mean Budgie, I asked my friend which part she is from and she replied: "Ulysses, Kansas. It is in the very southwest corner of the
    state. (the best part )."
    Last edited by JNL; 21 Nov 2006 at 10:08 PM.

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Rumpy Tunanator's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNL View post
    I had to do a search after you said that! You planted a seed of déjà vu in my head... but I can't find anything except a post of mine in the thread 'Your holiday menu' last year, where I discussed what I was serving for Christmas dinner. I'm pretty darn sure I've never been to a Thanksgiving meal with turkey and all the trimmings! Can't wait
    Maybe it was something about cooking something Christmas related for your friend, or something like that. Or maybe it was 4th of July something another. Oh well. Something seemed very familiar........
    A guy once told me, "Do not have any attachments, do not have anything in your life you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you spot the heat around the corner."


    Neil McCauley (Robert DeNiro): Heat 1995

  23. #23
    Cyburbian JNL's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Rumpy Tunanator View post
    Or maybe it was 4th of July something another. Oh well. Something seemed very familiar........
    Aha, you're right, found this: http://www.cyburbia.org/forums/showt...t=25293&page=2
    Quote Originally posted by JNL
    I have been invited to a 4th of July barbecue which I'm looking forward to (which will be interesting since it's mid winter here). Not quite sure what to expect? Any tips on something I could surprise them with to remind them of home?
    Quote Originally posted by biscuit View post
    Your Virginia friend might appreciate either a pecan, or a sweet potato pie. That is if you can get either pecans or fresh sweet potatoes in New Zealand this time of year. If not, a nice wine to complement the turkey would be thoughtful.
    Thanks for the suggestions! Yep I can get pecans, and we have our own variety of sweet potato (kumara) available year round. A little bit of trivia:
    Kumara in the history of New Zealand

    The kumara has a long history of cultivation in New Zealand. Brought here by the early Maori settlers over one thousand years ago from its Pacific Island source, it was widely grown especially in the semi-tropical regions of the North Island. Archeological diggings at the Waipoua Forest near Kaipara have revealed kumara cultivation from very early Pre-european Maori times.

    The Maori managed kumara growing with great horticultural skill, making use of the ideal growing climate and controlling kumara caterpillar with the use of tamed black-backed seagulls. Kumara caterpillar could devastate a crop almost overnight, hatching in their thousands. Pre-European Maori grew several different varieties of ‘bush’ kumara, but compared to the varieties we eat today, were very small in size, being no bigger than a person’s finger.

    The kumara we eat today has evolved from a larger American variety which grows on a creeping vine. It was imported in the early 1850’s, and was quickly adopted by the Maori for its superior size and taste. Over time a dark red variety developed and named Owairaka Red.

    In most other countries they are called sweet potatoes. New Zealand kumara are available in red, gold or orange varieties, each with a deliciously different colour and taste. The majority of kumara is grown in Northland. http://www.kumara.co.nz/about.shtml
    Last edited by JNL; 21 Nov 2006 at 10:26 PM. Reason: added more info

  24. #24
    Cyburbian nerudite's avatar
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    Pumpkin bread is my fave Turkey day food, especially with shopped walnuts in the bread. Yum!

  25. #25
    Cyburbian AubieTurtle's avatar
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    Little Richard can clue you into what's expected on Thanksgiving:
    http://youtube.com/watch?v=Em-b0wQzQ-0
    As democracy is perfected, the office of president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron. - H.L. Mencken

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