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Thread: Insitutional master plans

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
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    Insitutional master plans

    What communities have requirements for "Institutional Master Plans" for hospitals, universities, or other large institutions? What is required in them? How much force do they have?

    I know that Boston and Cambridge require them. I am especially interested in how they can be used to help manage growth and change in locations where such uses are exempt from traditional zoning.

  2. #2
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    In my 2nd ring suburb of Chicago, we require that all institutionally zoned properties require a PUD review process. Within that process we want the entity (a large regional hospital in our case) to develop a 5 year masterplan for the expansion of the campus with allowances for permit review of specific building desgins to fit the building envelopes in the masterplan.

    We do this to management the impacts (esp. traffic) of the increase in intensity of the site on the adjacent properties and roadways.

    5 years is a reasonable timeframe because of the nature of change within the healthcare industry.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

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    Cyburbian mike gurnee's avatar
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    Any decent institution already has a master plan. Rather than require, I think it best to draw them into the comprehensive planning process, initiating communications. It may take years and a few retirements (try getting a public school district to come to the table), but keep plugging away.

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    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mike gurnee View post
    (try getting a public school district to come to the table)
    Yeah...State chartered entities (public schools, public universities, DOTs, etc) are the hardest to get, because they are usually exempt from local regulations and know it.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    The ends can justify the means.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    I don't require it, but I ask very nicely to get a copy of one - and the hospital has me come to some of their meetings on them to "check in", which is great, and the College of the Atlantic ans the Jackson Laboratory both gave me their Master Plan

    I think towns should offer to be there to help and support them in a "white dove" kind of way but also to say "hey, let's look at regulations that help meet your needs and still protect what the Town needs to protect", it should be coordinated

    when I worked for a firm that did campus planning exclusively, one of the first stops I made was to the local planning department to say hello - (then to the student union to find out where the beach was so I didn't locate the new science building there )

  6. #6
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    New Mexico now requires that all public school districts have a master plan that conforms to a consistent strusture. It emerged after a lawsuit filed by districts that had been slighted on building improvement funding (a leaking roof for 4 years at a reservation school while others were getting new gymnasiums, for example). To create an equitable system for distributing funds, the state create the Public Schools Facility Authority which tracks all the districts' needs and doles out funds according to priority projects. If they do not do a plan and if it is not done according to a specific format (for cross-comparison), they do not qualify for state funding. To facilitate the process, the state does offer technical assistance funding so districts can hire firms to compile the plan.

    http://www.nmschoolbuildings.org/

    These facility masterplans do not necessarily integrate with municipal Comp plans, though, except to the extent that they both use the same population/demographic projections to estimate future demand.

    I don't know if this is what you had in mind...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

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    My undergraduate alma mater, Carleton University, has created several 'master plans' throughout its history. Had the 1960s master plan come to fruition, the whole campus would have looked like a modernist housing project. Thankfully, the more recent master plan is a touch more friendly.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian natski's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by mendelman View post
    Yeah...State chartered entities (public schools, public universities, DOTs, etc) are the hardest to get, because they are usually exempt from local regulations and know it.
    Kinda the same over here- Many universities are located on Federally owned land and are exempt from state planning laws- notwithstanding they usually provide a master plan anyway in order to make the local Councils aware of what is going on, and the universities find them beneficial for their own planning needs.
    "Have you ever wondered if there was more to life, other than being really, really, ridiculously good looking?" Zoolander

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