Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: A few questions about the planning profession

  1. #1
    Member
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3

    A few questions about the planning profession

    Reading some of these threads, I can see that this is a very diverse career, and there is very little tedious repetitive work. This excites me, and at the same time, it worries me, so with that said,

    Question #1: How do you learn how to do everything you do? It almost looks like you're juggling multiple jobs. Does it look more overwhelming than it is?

    Question #2: From what I understand, there is no particular shortage of jobs. Is this true?

    Question #3: Salary. It is important that when I start a career, I am self sufficient and can sustain a family. Being European, my family would frown upon my wife earning more than me, and not being the main "bread winner". (No offense to any ladies out there).

    Question #4: This is something that definetely interests me, and appeals to me, but it isn't something I've been dreamin about since I was in diapers. How did YOU decide you wanted this as a career?

    Question #5: Any differences between American and Canadian urban development?

    Question #6: Anything I LOVE doing, I have become the best at. That being said, how difficult is it to climb to the top of the business?

    Sorry for all the questions!

    Edit: Can't change the the title! I meant a FEW questions lol
    Last edited by Yureeka47; 03 Dec 2006 at 6:54 PM.

  2. #2
    Cyburbian donk's avatar
    Registered
    Sep 2001
    Location
    skating on thin ice
    Posts
    6,958
    1) The easiest way to learn everything is by osmosis, it just sort of happens, and then people tell you how to fix the things you may not be doing as cleanly as they should be done.

    2) In Ontario and especially the GTA right now there are lots of jobs.

    3) This may be an issue. Planners to start make high 40's low 50's so depending on what your wife does. Planners top out in teh high 70's, unless you are a partner or high level manager.

    4) I am a disillusioned planner so I best not comment.

    5) No comment, no expereince

    6) Climbing to teh top is pretty hard, unless you are a total standout or kiss up well.
    Too lazy to beat myself up for being to lazy to beat myself up for being too lazy to... well you get the point....

  3. #3
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Down by Dun Ringill
    Posts
    5,895
    Blog entries
    6
    Question #1: Most planners get a basic philosophical and practical education in the university, then learn the rest on the job.

    Question #2: We have a shortage here in Montana. Hard to find qualified people. Might be because we are out on the boonies and don't pay asd well as back East or on the Pacific Coast.

    Question #3: It is a middle-class government job. Pay isn't outstanding, but the benefits make up for it some.

    Question #4: I decided for it as a career by being involved on the other side of the table working on many of the same issues, and thought I could do more and get paid if I became a planner

    Question #5: Don't know.

    Question #6: Not sure. Being at the top isn't all its cracked up to be sometimes. It is the guys on top of the stagecoach that get shot first when the Indians attack. I am the number 2 man in my department and that is where I want to be. Took me about four years at my current job to get there and two years previous to that.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  4. #4
    Cyburbian munibulldog's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Where 8 Mile hits Lake M1
    Posts
    278
    1: There is a lot to learn, there is no end to the learning.

    2: It depends where you are. There are not too many jobs in MI right now.

    3: You won't get rich working as a public servant. But it is OK middle class wages.

    4: I liked working with maps and started studying geograpy. Currently I do almost no mapmaking.

    5: Yes. Americans want enough land to turn their 18 wheeler around on. Canadians don't seem to mind living next door to someone.

    6: In this job, the elected officials are at the top, and as paid staff you are expected to defer to their wisdom.

  5. #5
    Member
    Registered
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the replies, they are very helpful! I think that it's important that a future career of mine has a certain level of creativity... so a few more questions.

    Is an Urban Designer and an Urban Planner completely different?

    Do you ever do any designing? (parks, new suburbs etc.)

    Is there a difference in salary between the two careers?

    If I'm interested in Urban Design, am I at the wrong forums? lol

    Thanks again, the quicker the replies the better! I have to submit my University application soon. Sorry for taking so long to reply, I work 75 hours a week

  6. #6
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    in a meeting
    Posts
    8,451

    answers in blue

    Quote Originally posted by Yureeka47 View post
    Reading some of these threads, I can see that this is a very diverse career, and there is very little tedious repetitive work. This excites me, and at the same time, it worries me, so with that said,

    Question #1: How do you learn how to do everything you do? Planning background, internship, and an entry level position and work your way up It almost looks like you're juggling multiple jobs. yes, that's why I like it Does it look more overwhelming than it is? it can be over the top, but again, that's why I like it

    Question #2: From what I understand, there is no particular shortage of jobs. Is this true? I just posted an entry level position and got about 90 resumes, so I'm not sure

    Question #3: Salary. It is important that when I start a career, I am self sufficient and can sustain a family. Being European, my family would frown upon my wife earning more than me, and not being the main "bread winner". (No offense to any ladies out there). as the principal bread winner in my house and female, I can't relate to this kind of thinking anymore

    Question #4: This is something that definetely interests me, and appeals to me, but it isn't something I've been dreamin about since I was in diapers. How did YOU decide you wanted this as a career? I fell in while studying to be a chemist and switched my major and so glad I did!

    Question #5: Any differences between American and Canadian urban development? to avoid an internaitonal incident, I will not touch this one!

    Question #6: Anything I LOVE doing, I have become the best at. That being said, how difficult is it to climb to the top of the business? not difficult, just keep your head down, work hard, be humble and you'll do fine
    Sorry for all the questions!

    Edit: Can't change the the title! I meant a FEW questions lol
    Quote Originally posted by Yureeka47 View post
    Thanks for the replies, they are very helpful! I think that it's important that a future career of mine has a certain level of creativity... so a few more questions.

    Is an Urban Designer and an Urban Planner completely different? yes, urban design is a faction of landscape architecture or architecture, where urban planners are just that

    Do you ever do any designing? (parks, new suburbs etc.) a little, more often I am red lining other people's work

    Is there a difference in salary between the two careers? not sure

    If I'm interested in Urban Design, am I at the wrong forums? lol nope, you can stay

    Thanks again, the quicker the replies the better! I have to submit my University application soon. Sorry for taking so long to reply, I work 75 hours a week
    Good luck with it all!

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 1
    Last post: 24 Sep 2012, 2:09 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last post: 28 May 2010, 10:11 AM
  3. What is the planning profession really like?
    Career Development and Advice
    Replies: 12
    Last post: 19 Aug 2008, 8:01 AM
  4. Planning as a profession
    Student Commons
    Replies: 6
    Last post: 20 Sep 2007, 1:38 PM
  5. Urban planning as a profession
    Make No Small Plans
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 08 Sep 2004, 10:49 AM