Urban planning community | #theplannerlife

+ Reply to thread
Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: How many is too many (job history)

  1. #1
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Snarkville
    Posts
    6,599

    How many is too many (job history)

    I know that changing jobs too much can look bad on your resume. Is there a general rule of thumb where employers may pass you up because you've moved around too much in too little time?

    What things would an employer be looking at when a potential employee has changed jobs somewhat frequently and would a resume with many job changes be passed over at first glance?

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    41
    How frequent? Someone changing jobs every year would concern me greatly, while every two to three years might be reasonable. It really depends upon the reasons the moves are made. If the resume shows evidence of career advancement or unique work experiences, it would be seen as a positive. It just depends.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,192
    Quote Originally posted by Citizen Kane View post
    How frequent? Someone changing jobs every year would concern me greatly, while every two to three years might be reasonable. It really depends upon the reasons the moves are made. If the resume shows evidence of career advancement or unique work experiences, it would be seen as a positive. It just depends.
    On the flip side, how little is too little. I've been at my job for almost seven years and still love it. But, I am worried that when/if I do try to move on it will be difficult, even though I can show advancement.

  4. #4
    Cyburbian imaplanner's avatar
    Registered
    May 2004
    Location
    Snarkville
    Posts
    6,599
    Quote Originally posted by SW MI Planner View post
    On the flip side, how little is too little. I've been at my job for almost seven years and still love it. But, I am worried that when/if I do try to move on it will be difficult, even though I can show advancement.
    I am of the opinion that a longer stay at a job and less career moves is potentially a good thing - as it shows that you can be committed and have significant accomplishments with an employer. I'm afraid that moving around too much (every 2 years or so) might look bad because it might show a lack of committment?

    But I am not a manager or in charge of hiring decisions.

    (maybe some of the resident big cheeses could respond? )

  5. #5
    Cyburbian Masswich's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Ocean to the east, land to the west
    Posts
    1,220

    Also Depends on Your Level of Experience

    Quote Originally posted by Citizen Kane View post
    How frequent? Someone changing jobs every year would concern me greatly, while every two to three years might be reasonable. It really depends upon the reasons the moves are made. If the resume shows evidence of career advancement or unique work experiences, it would be seen as a positive. It just depends.
    I think this is generally right. However, the length of time spent at each job should be consistent with your level on the responsibility ladder. If you move around every year or two (or even more) when you're young, that's OK and shows that you are exploring. That's especially understandable if you move on because you want a higher challenge.

    However, if you do it when you're higher up, it may show an attention span problem or an inherently dissatisfied person (not something I look for in an employee). On the other hand it may be the result of bad employers, not bad employees.

    All that aside, as someone who hires people I'd be more inclined to look at what someone has done than how many places they've worked. References and pointed interview questions can help flesh out if they burned bridges. Maybe I am forgiving about this because I used to move around a lot?

  6. #6
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The Cheese State
    Posts
    10,074
    I agree with the comments about how long did you stay, and why did you leave. I have some short stays on my resume - the wrong field, a small town job to get my foot in the door, and an intolerable environment - but I also have three years in one job and eight in another. Each move was to a bigger community and after the first couple, always in a director's position. This has never hurt me when I sent out resumes. During interviews I have occassionally been asked about it, and answered well enough to get a job offer.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Townville
    Posts
    1,047
    The best answer is that it all depends. I have moved around a little more than average I suppose. But it may be different because I am on the private side--markets change etc...I never begrudge anyone who moves from one job to another, especially if it is a clear move up the ladder. If you make a move because its the best thing for you and your family, you have no one you need to answer to.

    I actually have had this discussion in an interview: Interviewer is concerned I would use the job as a stepping stone. Reasonable concern really at that point in time. I asked what kind of committment the employer wanted. Minimum 3 years they said. I responded that would be fine and that would like that 3 years guranteed, with bonus and increases, no 90 day probationary period. They declined. So did I.

    Point is there is nothing wrong with asking for committment--the employer just has to be ready to do the same.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Plus
    Registered
    Jun 2003
    Location
    curiosity
    Posts
    21,905
    Quote Originally posted by SW MI Planner View post
    On the flip side, how little is too little. I've been at my job for almost seven years and still love it. But, I am worried that when/if I do try to move on it will be difficult, even though I can show advancement.
    I have the same feeling only starting my 15th yr.
    After my 12th -Teh Man gave me a job title/no pay increase of Senior Planner.
    For me it hasn't been so much the advancement but the responsibilities given.
    In another community I might be pigeoned holed - here I have to be a jack of all trades.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Somewhere between the mountains and the ocean.
    Posts
    17,006
    This is an interesting thread in that it is something that has worried me. I have been in the same Zoning and Code Administration job for a bit more than 3 years now, (along with a year as a planner I from my previous employer),

    By the time I go to get another job, I will have my masters and my AICP. Will enforcement side of the past three years be a negative if trying to get into the private sector?
    If you're not growing, you're dying. - Lou Holtz

  10. #10
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where Valley Fever Lives
    Posts
    8,138
    Blog entries
    1

    Hmmmm......

    I think short term jobs at lower levels will hurt more than short term jobs at higher levels. I agree it depends on the type of job and whether you move up the ranks. If your resume shows movement every year to three years with increased pay and title.....who cares, it would seem obvious that you have ambition. Employers that respond to this type of resume are more likely to reward ambition than fear it....and that should be a good thing.
    “The way of acquiescence leads to moral and spiritual suicide. The way of violence leads to bitterness in the survivors and brutality in the destroyers. But, the way of non-violence leads to redemption and the creation of the beloved community.”
    Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
    - See more at: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-ph....r7W02j3S.dpuf

  11. #11
    Cyburbian SW MI Planner's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    3,192
    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post
    This is an interesting thread in that it is something that has worried me. I have been in the same Zoning and Code Administration job for a bit more than 3 years now, (along with a year as a planner I from my previous employer),

    By the time I go to get another job, I will have my masters and my AICP. Will enforcement side of the past three years be a negative if trying to get into the private sector?
    You've been there 3 years now! Wow, that went fast. I would say that wouldn't be a problem - you were working on your masters and have your aicp. I would say staying there another 5 years without advancement might be an issue.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Somewhere between the mountains and the ocean.
    Posts
    17,006
    Quote Originally posted by SW MI Planner View post
    You've been there 3 years now! Wow, that went fast. I would say that wouldn't be a problem - you were working on your masters and have your aicp. I would say staying there another 5 years without advancement might be an issue.
    Yes, another 5 years would be an issue. If that happens everyone can come visit me in the insane asylum. (Code Enforcement is the my nemesis)
    If you're not growing, you're dying. - Lou Holtz

  13. #13
    Cyburbian DetroitPlanner's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Where the weak are killed and eaten.
    Posts
    6,247
    I've just past 15 with my current employer. I love my job and consider my pay and working conditions adequete. I wolrk for a big office, in a big city (my hometown), doing cool stuff. Growing up a poor kid in the inner-city was the reason why I wanted to get into planning. Why would I want to leave?
    We hope for better things; it will arise from the ashes - Fr Gabriel Richard 1805

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Clore's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Nether
    Posts
    193
    Glad this thread is here! I'm considering a position after a year in my current one- this is definitely a move up, with much more responsibility and working on a regional scale, with "manager" in the title versus "coordinator". I've been agonizing over this for a few weeks... this job kind of dumped in my lap and I'm working up the nerve to accept and give my notice....
    ...Moving at the speed of local government

+ Reply to thread

More at Cyburbia

  1. Replies: 34
    Last post: 07 Jan 2013, 10:47 AM
  2. History of sports
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 8
    Last post: 12 Sep 2011, 9:40 PM
  3. Local History
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 22 Sep 2008, 1:24 PM
  4. History
    Perry's Cantina (archive)
    Replies: 2
    Last post: 25 Aug 2001, 12:12 AM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last post: 11 Nov 1999, 9:58 AM