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Thread: CU-Denver questions

  1. #1
    Member
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    CU-Denver questions

    I'm a Jr Econ major (3.8GPA) at Colo St. and am interested in a career in planning and desire to work in or near a ski town (CO/CA/UT/WA/OR). With that in mind, would CU-Denver be a good choice? Also, what are the Pro's & Con's between the Economic & Community Dev. Planning and Land Use and Environmental Planning? Further, could I expect or should I negotiate for any financial assistance?

    Thank you for your time!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Having just graduated UC-Denver I would advise going either the physical planning or Environmental planning routes, assuming you want to work in a ski-town.
    Which you choose should be based on personal pref and how granola the town you want to work for is.

    Another important step is getting an internship in a mountain town. I had several friends who were focused on working in the mountains, and most succeeded through contacts they had made. This more than anyother reason is a good reason to go to school there. One friend of mine spent a summer living in a basement while he worked as an intern, and the cities one planner spent a year and a half campaigning to fund a postion for him. He got it and is as happy as a clam.

    Most of the towns are fairly small, so try and get as broad an education as possible. Site Planning (an Landscape Arch course) and the development review class are both important. Keep in mind that in many cases the associate professors and professionals who teach a class or two are better than the teachers on staff.

    No idea about aid - I just took out loans.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian The One's avatar
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    Ahhh.....

    Quote Originally posted by MountainTOD View post
    Having just graduated UC-Denver I would advise going either the physical planning or Environmental planning routes, assuming you want to work in a ski-town.
    Which you choose should be based on personal pref and how granola the town you want to work for is.

    Another important step is getting an internship in a mountain town. I had several friends who were focused on working in the mountains, and most succeeded through contacts they had made. This more than anyother reason is a good reason to go to school there. One friend of mine spent a summer living in a basement while he worked as an intern, and the cities one planner spent a year and a half campaigning to fund a postion for him. He got it and is as happy as a clam.

    Most of the towns are fairly small, so try and get as broad an education as possible. Site Planning (an Landscape Arch course) and the development review class are both important. Keep in mind that in many cases the associate professors and professionals who teach a class or two are better than the teachers on staff.

    No idea about aid - I just took out loans.
    What the TOD said.....

    Ski area towns have much less to worry about when it comes to money....cash....the bling....because it tends to just be ROLLING in (but then again, it seems to never be enough ) .....compared to the other side of the tracks....Mountain towns that don't have ski areas and/or are having to deal with workforce housing issues and the spill over of providing services for the workers......Keep a close eye on the economic side of things, because if you end up working in one of these "secondary" towns (or county) in the mountains, you'll be well served to have the economic background that you seem to already have.
    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness."
    John Kenneth Galbraith

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    Working in a mountain town can be enjoyable, but don't expect to be able to live in the mountain town if it is a resort town. Way expensive.

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