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Thread: Schools in Canada

  1. #1

    Schools in Canada

    Here it is. A thread on schools in Canada that we've all been waiting for.

    Just to start off, who's studied in Canada and what's your experience with the program or school?

    Here's a listed of accredited planning schools:
    http://www.cip-icu.ca/english/academic/cdn_uni.htm

    But I'm also curious about people who might be in the field of planning who might have studied in another discipline too.

  2. #2
    Hi,

    I have graduated from UBC. It is a great program, known for its focus on sustainability. There are a wide range of courses, and you can focus into one of the four streams: urban, social, international, and I forgot the last one. The streams are there to guide you, so aside from the required courses, you don't have rigidly follow the suggested courses.

    I have considered University of Toronto as well.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian RubberStamp Man's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Wherever mediocore planning lurks
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    99
    Queen's for me - planning program had its ups and downs just like anywhere else.

    Strengths:
    - policy bias
    - Good place to learn land economics relationship with planning and real estate development/pro forma analysis.
    - Financial incentives was the best among other planning programs at the time.
    - social planning
    - negotiation and ADR specialist on faculty
    - opportunities to take courses from other faculties
    - provision of an office space with high-speed connection if you find that beneficial

    Weaknesses
    - the computer lab was awful, although we got to share the Geog dept's GIS lab, whch was pretty good.
    - No design space despite having two architects on faculty (both of which are focussed on aspects other than design) and a doctorate of design.

    The university life was great - awesome town to be a student. I recommend joining a varsity team or club there to round you out.

    Other degree in geography (urban, GIS, Remote Sensing).

  4. #4
    Cyburbian supergeek1313's avatar
    Registered
    Oct 2005
    Location
    City of Angels
    Posts
    107
    I'm at U of T now...

    Pros:
    You're in Toronto, so you have access to a lot of resources (i.e., good guest lecturers, case studies)
    The staff is very diverse in their interests
    Opportunity for collaborative programs (such as Env Sci & Community Dev)
    Funding seems good - at least for first year

    Cons:
    They don't have good graphics programs, so if you're interested in Urban Design it kinda sucks (and our profs don't know AutoCAD or any of the other programs)
    A lot of profs seem to be on sabbatical/maternity leave so there have been classes with spotty instruction
    You need an A- average to continue funding into second year so there's a lot of unnecessary stress
    Many of the professors have not worked in the planning field but rather studied it academically

    I heard that Ryerson is much more practical... Toronto's program has a lot of theory/academia. I have had profs with more of an experience-based background but it's a mixed bag. I'm fine in the program but it definitely has its ups and downs.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    30
    True that Ryerson has a much more practical program... but they only offer an undergraduate degree.

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