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Thread: The 2007 Garden Thread

  1. #26
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    The mercury rose to 40 degrees today! Granted there's still about 5-6 inches of snow on the ground, but the garden is already started!!!!!



    What are we looking at in this photo? Well..... 6 'Copenhagen' green cabbage, 3 red cabbage, 4 green peppers, 1 parsley, 2 broccoli, 2 raab broccoli and about 26 petunias (so far). This weekend I will fill the remaining 9 empty cells with tomatoes - probably Roma VF and Sweet 100's and then I'll start the remaining flats of marigolds and zinnias!

  2. #27
    Cyburbian
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    Glad you found a use for that "Business Law" book

  3. #28
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by savemattoon View post
    Glad you found a use for that "Business Law" book
    Off-topic:
    Not to mention the upside down "Hits of the 70's" CD collection holding up the right side!

  4. #29
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    I just dug up my front walkway (old, old bricks and some pavers with pebbles between); roots were making it lumpy. Tomorrow I have to dig up several dozen more around a landscape area. They seemed like a good idea when I moved them there but the grass here overwhelms stuff like that so fast! Anyway, I'm freecycling the whole shebang this weekend.

    I am going to Lowe's tomorrow. I think I will look for some green pepper plants. They are the easiest veggie to grow here.

  5. #30
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    The mercury rose to 40 degrees today! Granted there's still about 5-6 inches of snow on the ground, but the garden is already started!!!!!



    What are we looking at in this photo? Well..... 6 'Copenhagen' green cabbage, 3 red cabbage, 4 green peppers, 1 parsley, 2 broccoli, 2 raab broccoli and about 26 petunias (so far). This weekend I will fill the remaining 9 empty cells with tomatoes - probably Roma VF and Sweet 100's and then I'll start the remaining flats of marigolds and zinnias!
    The temp got to 51 this afternoon, but unfortunately, there is still a good foot of snow in most places. It's been so nasty that I have no gardening spirit this year, but I'm hoping it'll come soon!

    Back in early January, farmers here in the Southern Tier were starting to tap their sugar maples and a few had collected some sap -- and then we went into the deep freeze for the second half of January, all of February, and all of March until today!!! It was -4 Monday or Tuesday! Sugaring season will be late this year!

  6. #31
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    The Great Pea Experiment



    The seedlings are progressing well indoors and should be able to plant the frost tolerant plants like cabbage and broccoli in another week and a half or so, but it always feels good to plant those first seeds of the season directly into the receiving earth. This year for the first time I decided to plant garden peas. I've always grown sugar snap peas (you know, with the edible pods) and still intend to plant those in about 10 days, but felt like trying some different varieties of peas to see how they grow (and taste!). What you see in the photo above are 28 'green arrow' peas which got sown on 3/18/07. I also have some 'wando' variety of pea seeds and will probably plant those tonight. I understand that around these parts the traditional time to plant garden peas is on St. Patricks day, so I'm pretty close to being on schedule.

    Oh, yeah, and we got a tray of seeds started last night of: zinnias, marigolds, snapdragons, lupine, and chinese lanterns

    Has anyone else planted their peas yet or intend to this spring?

  7. #32
    Zoning Lord Richmond Jake's avatar
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    A couple of pics of Twin Palms Vineyards. I'm thinking of petitioning the ATF for my own Appellation of Origin. Pompous of me, isn't it?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC00537 (3).jpg   DSC00539 (3).jpg  

    Annoyingly insensitive

  8. #33
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    The last couple days of spring-like weather was just a cruel tease. Fortunately the plants in my yard were not fooled. Looks like another week of winter, at least. But I have my catalog order already in and delivery should be next month - saskatoon blueberries, gooseberries, more asparagus and butterfly-loving plants.

    Oh well, a little more cold weather. At least we got to barbecue on Saturday.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  9. #34
    Cyburbian ssc's avatar
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    Lasagne garden anyone?

    Sounds like there are some seasoned gardeners on this thread! Has anyone tried lasagna gardening? We have terrible (clay) soil around our new house, so I thought I'd try the lasagna method of starting a garden - lay down newspaper, then cover with alternating layers of compost material and peat, then plant. I am planning on using the spent grain from hubby's brewery. I want to plant the basics - beans, peas, lettuces, tomatoes, pepper, squash, etc. Apparently no need to even let the compost cook first.... Sounds too easy to be true - is it???

  10. #35
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ssc View post
    Sounds like there are some seasoned gardeners on this thread! Has anyone tried lasagna gardening?
    I planted some dogwoods and rugosa roses in a lasagne bed last year, because the previous owners planted day lilies everywhere and they spread. Short of digging up the entire yard to pull them all out (inevitably I miss some), the lasagne method seemed to be the best option. So far, so good.

    I am jealous that you have spent grain to use. I used to buy this great stuff that was a brewery by-product; it worked great in the garden... can't remember what it was called... but I was disappointed to learn last year from our local nursery that the product is no longer available.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally posted by ssc
    Sounds like there are some seasoned gardeners on this thread! Has anyone tried lasagna gardening? We have terrible (clay) soil around our new house, so I thought I'd try the lasagna method of starting a garden - lay down newspaper, then cover with alternating layers of compost material and peat, then plant. I am planning on using the spent grain from hubby's brewery. I want to plant the basics - beans, peas, lettuces, tomatoes, pepper, squash, etc. Apparently no need to even let the compost cook first.... Sounds too easy to be true - is it???
    I’ve never needed to use the method myself (we have good loamy soils here) but have heard many good things about lasagna gardening. I’m very skeptical, though, of the claim that it doesn’t need to ‘cook’ for a season first; everyone I’ve ever talked to who’s tried it, let it cook for a year first.

    Clay soils can be a real problem for gardeners because most plant’s root systems can’t deal with the lack of air space between the colloidal particles. Soil prep for gardening is important because it 1) ensures plants receive adequate nutrition 2) retain water between particles 3) retain airspace between particles. Clay soils tend to have a high nutritive content but really suck at 2) and 3) and the plants pay the price. Lasagna gardening would allow you to effectively overcome the soil conditions by creating your own ‘new’ soil media.

    The only drawbacks I could think of are having to wait for a year (and it might be an instructive experiment to try planting your garden immediately without cooking, at worst you’d be out the cost of the seeds and the annoyance of experiencing crop failure for one season) and the generally unattractive appearance that lasagna gardens tend to have (wouldn’t be an issue for me, but mention it in case you were planning on installing it in the front yard to showcase your roses).

    Give it a try and share the results of your experiment with us all! We’d love to hear how it turns out.

  12. #37
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Thanks to the Cyburbia Community, we tried something new. I was reading this gardening thread and I thought (and it was touched on in the thread) "what a great thing to get my kids and I to try". So I did. We put together a nice little garden and believe it or not, something is growing in it (carrots, tomato plants, pumpkin plants, so far). My kids find this really interesting and helped create the garden and they keep it watered. It really has been a lot of fun, so....

    Thanks Cybubia for these off-beat threads.

    I will post a picture of our gardening enterprise.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  13. #38
    Cyburbian Big Owl's avatar
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    well i was bit by the garden bug and got a round to building the raised beds i've been planning for the last few years. I am trying the square foot garden method. I just have two 4' x 4' beds. I have the soil in one and i will do the other tomorrow night. Now i have to go and find out the sugested spacing for tomato plants and pepper plants. I believe Mel sugest 18" squares for those, does that sound right Maister?

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally posted by Big Owl View post
    well i was bit by the garden bug and got a round to building the raised beds i've been planning for the last few years. I am trying the square foot garden method. I just have two 4' x 4' beds. I have the soil in one and i will do the other tomorrow night. Now i have to go and find out the sugested spacing for tomato plants and pepper plants. I believe Mel sugest 18" squares for those, does that sound right Maister?
    Pepper plants are placed in 12" squares. Tomatoes are placed in 12" squares if they are an indeterminate (i.e. vining) variety and grow veritically, or are placed in 18" - 24" squares (I prefer 24" squares myself) if they are a determinate (i.e. bush) variety. I've noticed a lot of seed packets and transplant flats don't include this information, so if you're not sure what type of tomatoes you've got, don't hesitate to ask.

  15. #40
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    I have a garden question.... I planted a lot of seeds in each area. I have a lot of little plants. What I read says to pull out all of the extra ones so that you have the correct spacing....

    My question is, can I pull those extra ones and plant then somewhere else? Is it a waste of time?
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally posted by Flying Monkeys View post
    I have a garden question.... I planted a lot of seeds in each area. I have a lot of little plants. What I read says to pull out all of the extra ones so that you have the correct spacing....

    My question is, can I pull those extra ones and plant then somewhere else? Is it a waste of time?
    Not worth the effort. Put 'em in the compost pile.

  17. #42
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Garden Question: It is going to be in the 30's at night where I am this weekend....Should I cover the new vegetable plants? If yes, then with what? (I need to work on my farming skills)
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  18. #43
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by Flying Monkeys View post
    Garden Question: It is going to be in the 30's at night where I am this weekend....Should I cover the new vegetable plants? If yes, then with what? (I need to work on my farming skills)
    Upper 30's, I wouldn't worry. If it is supposed to frost, yes. You can cover with anything from plastic to towels. If the plants are fragile, put an empty coffee can or plastic cup over them. Make sure what you use can't blow off the plants.

  19. #44
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Flying Monkeys View post
    Garden Question: It is going to be in the 30's at night where I am this weekend....Should I cover the new vegetable plants? If yes, then with what? (I need to work on my farming skills)
    That depends on what vegetables you've planted - vegetables such as cabbage, peas, parlsey, radishes, spinach, lettuce, or broccoli are frost tolerant and require no special protection. Plants like beans, tomatoes, squash, potatoes, or heck, just about anything else need to be protected from frost. When covering plants there are two things to keep in mind: 1) make sure the covering material forms an effective cold air-barrier and 2) make sure the covering material does not crush the young plants.

    Old bed sheets make a very good barrier but can crush plants if they are too young or otherwise not yet sturdy enough to sustain the wieght of the sheet - it's a judgement call that you'll have to make. Plastic and newspaper can also be used to cover rows of plants, and styrofoam rose cones or coffee cans can be used to cover individual plants (if you've got a small garden and very young plants).

  20. #45
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Thanks, Oh great Garden Masters... We are new to this and your help is appreciated. I plan on posting a pic as soon as I get a new camera battery.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  21. #46
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    I've been gone for 3 days and my green and red bell pepper plants grew about 6 inches. I anticipate a good crop this year! My favorite veggies of all! Mix them with some sweet Vidalia onions.... yum.

  22. #47
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Zoning Goddess View post
    I've been gone for 3 days and my green and red bell pepper plants grew about 6 inches. I anticipate a good crop this year! My favorite veggies of all! Mix them with some sweet Vidalia onions.... yum.
    Then brown them all with some olive oil and mix it in an omelet. Good stuff.

    The biscuit household had great plans for a garden this year. But alas, the tearing out of the backyard has put a damper on that. So much for running a farmers market out of the house.

  23. #48
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    The other day I was looking at how leggy the cabbage and broccoli seedlings had gotten and feeling real guilty about not making the time to plant my cool weather vegetables on April Fools day like I had originally planned.....that is I felt guilty UNTIL IT SNOWED 3 INCHES ON THE 5th! Procrastination has its advantages sometimes.

  24. #49
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    It looks like our young plants made it through the little spring anomaly in the weather. We covered them every night and uncovered them every morning. The watermelon vines have now popped up.... And the cilantro and lettuce are growing all over the place.
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

  25. #50
    Cyburbian Flying Monkeys's avatar
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    Still no picture.... but this has become a real family type activity. My kids want to go check the plants in the morning and water them....then we all go out and check them in the evening when I get home. They are amazed at how fast stuff grows.

    I wonder though.... could I slip a few 'adult' seeds in the back there and grow some organic mary jane....just kidding
    What’s in a name? – Your reputation….:)

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