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Thread: Photoshop for Planners?

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Photoshop for Planners?

    Does anyone have any references on how to use Photoshop in a professional planning setting? Most of the stuff I've learned has been on the job, and I do a decent job, yet some basic things, like efficiently making dotted lines, are still a mystery to me. I can do some common planning-related tasks, like transforming an aerial into a colorful street schematic, but dotted lines and other sophisticated tasks are, right now, too time consuming.

    For instance, on the following image, I can easily make the colored polygons, but what if I want to make a dotted line go from the scanned photo to its representative block? I can't do it! Help!



    If anyone has some Photoshopping web links, tips, or knows of a publication geared toward architects, designers, and planners, please share! Thank you!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
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    i can help you.. but not yet

    no photoshop at work.

    i will respond to this at home... also, what version of photoshop are you using?
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Awesome!

    Boiker,

    I'm using 6.0. Thanks, I'll look for your reply!

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Photoshop for Planners - now that would be a course I would take. I have to admit that I generally do not use Photoshop for much more than photo manipulation. I will usually bring the image into a drawing program like CorelDraw or Adobe Illustrator, and do any line art in that program.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian jordanb's avatar
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    Just so you all know, there's a free program called the Gimp that has most of the functionality of photoshop (and some stuff it dosen't have). You could probably save your agency a little bit of cash by using it instead.

    The Gimp is now the preferred bitmap editor for Hollywood, I know, it was used for gollum and all that.

  6. #6
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Photoshop is really a bitmap manipulation image; it isn't intended for making maps or complex diagrams. Like what Mr. Stumpf said, you're better off using a vector drawing program like Adobe Illustrator or Corel Draw.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    I tried Illustrator on Friday and I was pleased with the results. But still, does anyone know of any links or publications for planners that give tips for Photoshop or Illustrator?

  8. #8
    Member green lizard's avatar
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    Originally posted by Alan
    planners that give tips for Photoshop or Illustrator?
    Here is a tip... Use powerpoint. Use the Photoshop to
    manipulate the photos, but put them together in Powerpoint.
    Then you can draw all the dashed lines you want. And if
    you spend a day or two fooling around with Powerpoint, you become a Powerpoint expert. (oh yeah, do a 'save as' on your
    photoshop file and save it as a JEPG or something that will
    import into Powerpoint.)

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I may disagree with using Powerpoint. Relative to Illistrator or Corel, it gives you less ability to add features, fills, text, etc. If you have the better software, use it.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Yes, I agree with Michael. Those Adobe products are powerful. Plus, any Illustrator document that you can create can easily be made into a Reader PDF document that you can print off any time or forward to friends who can give input.

  11. #11
    Member green lizard's avatar
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    Originally posted by Alan
    Plus, any Illustrator document that you can create can easily be made into a Reader PDF document that you can print off any time or forward to friends who can give input.
    Any document can be 'printed off' into a PDF file. I did not say
    use powerpoint to do a lot, just to assemble your elements
    together into different layouts for different uses.

    For example, I touch up a photo for future appearance.
    I create a map of the areas overlay district. I illistrate the setback
    reqerment. I can bring these into Powerpoint and assemble
    them into an informative group of slides. One shows the map and the improved pic as a 'pull-out'. One sldie shows the map
    and red dots where the setbacks are violated along with the
    setback illistration. And I can add all the titles and text to
    these slides without affecting the original illistrations.

    Just another approach...

  12. #12
    I would like to see a section over at www.cgarchitect.com for planners actually. Because, the types of illustrations they have to do for various schemes and projects are very specific indeed.

    An moderator or editor here at Cyburbia should actually get on to the Senior guy at cgarchitect and request a section for planners specifically. A section in Finish Work forums i think for posting graphics etc, to do with planning illustration and so on.

    You can reach him here:

    admin@cgarchitect.com

    Of course, there is a photoshop forum at cgarchitect too, and the posters there are really very helpful indeed.

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    I just picked up a great book, "50 Fast Digital Photo Techniques," by Gregory Georges. Doesn't cover everything I'm interested in, but it has already added to my repetoire of Photoshopping skills. It has a CD-ROM and some great sample images, before and after. Also has a free Adobe imaging program, not Photoshop, and expires after 30 days. I love it! It's on amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...510321-1962408 and only costs $18.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Originally posted by garethace
    I would like to see a section over at www.cgarchitect.com for planners actually...
    Great site! The discussion forum is awesome and everyone posts images and receives feedback. What an excellent community! I'm going to have to spend more time there. Thank you for the link!

  15. #15
    No trouble at all, and thankyou for the great discussion here at cyburbia - being an architect myself i have to deal with many, many different planning proposals in different offices i have worked in.

    I enjoy the more detailed aspects of architectural design - like the visualisation stuff as seen at cg architect, but i realise the need for a wider scope, or overview to the process of designing too.

    Particularly in the early stages of my desk, and on-site site analysis for a design problem.

  16. #16
    Cyburbian chasqui's avatar
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    Photoshop not the answer to all imaging

    I have to agree with the post that recommended Corel. The strong-suit of photoshop is raster images - ie pictures. Corel handles the vector stuff with ease. Corel is great once you have cropped and cleaned up your images in photoshop. I use photoshop a lot as a planner, but I do not recommend it for laying out a page or creating documents. I highly recommend it for creating small images, cleaning up photos, etc - but for design work, take your cleaned images into another program. You have a lot of page layout and design control with a program such as Corel.

  17. #17
    Cyburbian H's avatar
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    Re: Photoshop not the answer to all imaging

    Originally posted by chasqui
    I have to agree with the post that recommended Corel.
    I am without a doubt on the Corel team! But I still use photoshop for scanning.
    "Those who plan do better than those who do not plan, even though they rarely stick to their plan." - Winston Churchill

  18. #18
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Interesting Corel/Adobe debate. I started out with Corel, so have continued to use it. Last year, though, I purchased Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat and InDesign. I have switched over to Photoshop for most ohotgraphic work and use InDesign or Acrobat for documents. Most of my vector work I still do in Corel Draw. This is in part because many of the base images (maps, logos, etc.) that I already have are made with Corel, but I still do find it easier to use than Illustrator. Familiarity counts for a lot when you are pressed for time.

  19. #19
    Cyburbian DecaturHawk's avatar
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    Great thread. Does anybody use PaintShop Pro instead of Photoshop or Corel? PaintShop lets you manipulate both raster and vector objects on the same image, a' la Corel, but is hundreds of dollars cheaper.

  20. #20
    Corn Burning Fool giff57's avatar
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    I use Paint Shop Pro...

  21. #21
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Originally posted by jordanb
    Just so you all know, there's a free program called the Gimp that has most of the functionality of photoshop (and some stuff it dosen't have).
    I've played around with the Gimp on Windows and Linux (gawd, don't you love how Linux programs have names that are totally unrelated to their function), and it seems to have a steep learning curve. Really, no steeper than Photoshop, but the interface takes a bit of getting used to. The Gimp might be a good option for a graphics program for those who don't haver the bucks for a licensed copy of Photoshop.

    I assume that there are GPLed and open source filters available for The Gimp?


    BTW, do a google search for "photoshop tutorials", and you'll find quite a few decent guides for evertything from simple Web graphics to advanced techniques.

    Photoshop for Planners (tm), OTOH ... really, it involves knowing how to manipulate layers, skewing pasted elements, the eraser and paint tools, the magic lasso and selection wand tools, color manipulation, and gaussian blurs. Master those, and you've got about 80% of what a planner would use in Photoshop.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  22. #22
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Has anyone ever created a land use map exclusively in Photoshop, resulting in a JPEG image that can essentially be moved around from one computer application to another, like for instance, from Adobe Illustrator to Word to PowerPoint? Is a JPEG file the best format for this kind of portability?

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    I didn't use Photoshop, but instead Corel Draw to make this map:

    http://www.cityofwhitewater.com/cont...ityMap2004.pdf

    In addition to the original Corel format, I can export the map as a PDF file or any of a number of image formats including JPG or TIFF. If I had not done the original map several years ago, I would probably now have chosen to draw it with Illustrator. You will get a much better product with a vector drawing program as opposed to something like Photoshop.
    Anyone want to adopt a dog?

  24. #24
    Cyburbian Wannaplan?'s avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal
    I didn't use Photoshop, but instead Corel Draw to make this map
    That is a beautiful map! Well done! I like it!

  25. #25
    Cyburbian Doitnow!!'s avatar
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    Pardon me for asking! because I am not good in any of these-Photoshop, Corel Draw and Illustrator.
    Reading the posts in this thread has made me realise that so much can be done with them.
    So reactions are welcome.

    I had always felt that for accurate scaled maps you need to use the real vector drawing softwares like Autocad and all.

    The biggest problem of presenting AutoCad drawings is that while converting them into interchange format for use into Photoshop, Corel Draw or even Illustrator some of the data may be lost.
    I do all my map work in AutoCad or sometimes further into ArcView.
    Only for making logos and converting small sized and not so complicated maps I use coverted information and improve them using Photoshop, Corel Draw, Illustrator.

    Primarily I use:
    Photoshop: for improving Image Quality, Resizing images, conerting them into various formats.
    CorelDraw and Illustrator to to improve AutoCad made drawings and making them publishing friendly, or for for making images which can be used in powerpoint for presentations.

    The maps, drawings made in Photoshop, Corel Draw, Illustrator may be very good looking and easy to print, publish and I like the map Cardinal made but:
    1. How Accurate is that. I am talking about the polygons and the areas/regions?
    2. What about the scale? (I saw the linear scale at the bottom). Is this an indicative map and a different map is prepared for implementation of the plan?

    I wish I could make such beautiful maps( compliment to Cardinal) but can't as I am really not too good with any of Photoshop, Corel Draw or Illustrator. I always have to get it done through some other professional.
    "I do not fear computers. I fear the lack of them".
    -Isaac Asimov

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