Urban planning community

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 35

Thread: Thy neighbors

  1. #1
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    18,044

    Thy neighbors

    I’ve always liked the idea of having a good rapport with one’s next door neighbors. Trouble is, in my current locale I seem to be surrounded by a strange assortment of sociopaths, hermits, and general nutjobs . We have plenty of friends in the neighborhood that occasionally stop by for dinner, go with us to see fireworks, reciprocally borrow tools/lawn furniture/cooking materials, or attend the occasional back yard bbq, but our immediate neighbors do not seem at all interested in establishing any contact with us (huh, maybe they don't like the shade of red we painted the cinderblocks our 1973 Olds Cutlas is sitting on?).

    How about the rest of you, does anyone enjoy that special Barney & Betty Rubble/Fred & Wilma Flintstone relationship with their next door neighbors? What level of interaction do you have with them?
    Last edited by Maister; 09 Feb 2007 at 10:53 AM.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  2. #2
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    At the moment I am sure mine are irritated with me (hanging garage doors with moving blankets along the top...

    For the most part I like all my neighbors. The ones directly across the street are selling thier home but we had a lot of fun over the past 6 years. When I first moved in, the ex and I threw a really big party, his band played, we invited all the nieghbors and ever since we have all had a great relationship. The one right next door are old and senile, they drive me crazy, constantly inviting me to their church and bringing lists of canidates for me to vote for during every elections (I am jewish and democrat, they are some other religion and republican, obviously thier suggestions don't get far with me). Other than that, there are about 11 kids on the cul de sac and a few teenagers that babysit. We don't do much socially but we do have little make-up/jewelry parties, birthday parties and in the summer on Sunday evneings we all sit outside and drinkt together.

  3. #3
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    18,044
    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra View post
    .... and in the summer on Sunday evneings we all sit outside and drinkt together.
    Okay, this is a good example of how wierd my neighbors are. One time I was sitting on the front porch on a summer day and enjoying a bottle of brew and my neighbor across the street walks by. I ask him if he'd like a cold one and he says 'no thanks, don't touch the stuff' (for the record it was Michelob and not some microbrew, either). Okay, no biggie the guy doesn't drink beer I think. Trouble is, in the following weeks we can't help but notice the guys herby curby is overflowing with trash on pickup day...yep, there must have been five or six empty cardboard beer cases in there .
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  4. #4
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    Quote Originally posted by Maister View post
    Okay, this is a good example of how wierd my neighbors are. One time I was sitting on the front porch on a summer day and enjoying a bottle of brew and my neighbor across the street walks by. I ask him if he'd like a cold one and he says 'no thanks, don't touch the stuff'. Okay, no biggie the guy doesn't drink beer I think. Trouble is, in the following weeks we can't help but notice the guys herby curby is overflowing with trash on pickup day...yep, there must have been five or six empty cardboard beer cases in there .
    Maybe the wife or kids drink??? Maybe he had a party?? Maybe he doesnt like you

  5. #5
    Cyburbian zman's avatar
    Registered
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    9,028
    Blog entries
    2
    A fine assortment of factory and brewery workers, young professionals, and police, fire, low-level govt. workers, people who latch onto the latest "get rich quick scheme". But we all seem to get together and get drunk, play softball, and have a good time. Actually for my sprawling/ex-farmland suburban communtiy wrife with vinyl siding, snout noses, and minivans w/ NASCAR stickers in the windows, the sense of community has not been stronger. Take that APA snobs!
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

  6. #6
    Cyburbian boiker's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2001
    Location
    West Valley, AZ
    Posts
    3,895
    My neighbors are great. There is a mix of young, old, and middle. Some kids, some not. Some married, some single. The neighborhood throws a labor day BBQ on a dead-end (or should I be PC "no outlet") near my house.

    The adjacent neighbors are great with helping out, baking goods, borrowing tools and what not. I couldn't ask for a more comfortable situation. I have yet to find the crazies or NASCAR nuts.

    We have an artist, a writer, laborers, doctors, teachers, janitors and cleaning professionals, stay-at-home moms, accountants and an urban planner. Really, an incredible economic and social variety that would make the CNU drool.
    Dude, I'm cheesing so hard right now.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Planit's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    In a 480 square foot ex baseball nacho stand
    Posts
    7,239
    Let's see,
    *neighbor in back rarely see and gone alot
    *to the left, we don't have much interaction - they are the ones with the leaf blower fetish
    *to the right, nice people alittle older and their grandson plays with Wee P when he's there
    *one door down, single girl with bf whom we have bent the elbow with on occassion
    *across the street are the parents of the leaf blowers

    To be honest, everyone is our 'hood are nice and we all wave and say hello with the cursury small talk when we're out walking
    "Whatever beer I'm drinking, is better than the one I'm not." DMLW
    "Budweiser sells a product they reflectively insist on calling beer." John Oliver

  8. #8
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    18,044
    Quote Originally posted by Jaxspra View post
    Maybe the wife or kids drink??? Maybe he had a party?? Maybe he doesnt like you
    He's 60 something and lives by himself. Never married. No kids. near as I can tell no friends either. I'm sure he doesn't like me.....or probably any other human being for that matter
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  9. #9
    Cyburbian Budgie's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2000
    Location
    Sans Souci
    Posts
    5,265
    When I was in grad school we and the couple next door used to have meal together, play cards and hang out together 3 or 4 times a week.

    7 years ago we used to share a backyard with a family and our 7 kids (our 3 and their 4) would play all the time. We'd spend lots of time hanging out in the backyard and had a fire pit for late night partying. I used to walk home for lunch and would end up hanging out at their house. The kids and I still visit them frequently. They've seen me go through some crap and I've seen them work through family and medical stuff. Lifelong family friends....

    Neighbors now, we do a lot of porch sitting, trying recipes out on eachother, 3 times a year we have a BBQ, fish fry or nut fry. Usually there's a fire and I get to play DJ. We let eachother know when we're out of town, we care for eachothers dogs, I shovel the snow for the block and my neighbors mow the vacant lot next door. It's very nice.
    "And all this terrible change had come about because he had ceased to believe himself and had taken to believing others. " - Leo Tolstoy

  10. #10
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    Oh I forgot, the neighbors behind us...never see them and when I do they are anything but friendly and then to top it off, I told my oldest not to shoot his paintball gun near any of the houses....I pick the thing up to shoot it one afternoon and of course, good 'ol mom shoots the neighbors, white vinyl sided house with neon pink paint....didn't set a good example, I let the rain that evening wash it away...there were a few other paint ball events with two of the neighbors behind me and the 11 kids on the cul de sac...they aren't too fond of me

  11. #11
    maudit anglais
    Registered
    May 1997
    Location
    Odd-a-wah
    Posts
    6,586
    Got along okay with our neighbours at the old place. Mixture of older and younger people.

    We're renting an apartment right now while we get settled and I want to seriously injure both the upstairs neighbours (who must weigh 500lbs each and wear combat boots all the time) and the guy next door who has friends over 2-3 times a week until the wee hours. His balcony, where his buddies go to smoke, is in close proximity to our bedroom window.

  12. #12
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    18,044
    The type of housing and neighborhood can have an impact on the sort of rapport one has with their neighbors I’m sure. The tightest knit community I ever experienced was barracks life. Naturally, when one’s very life depends on their neighbor one makes the utmost effort to build the strongest bonds possible. I thought life in the dorm was interesting too, less of a cohesive bond than the barracks, but it seemed like there was more fun/good times social interactions with neighbors in this environment than any other. Moving to an apartment building after just getting married we had a good rapport with many people in our unit and had lots of cookouts and pet sat for each other, but also experienced some animosity (seems like hating anyone who lives directly above is mandatory)
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  13. #13
    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
    Registered
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Down by Dun Ringill
    Posts
    5,989
    Blog entries
    6
    I've mentioned before in forum that one of my neighbors doesn't care for us. Apparently I am not as zealous about lawn maintenance as they are. They once offered to loan me their lawn mower. They didn't seem to have a problem with the other neighbor who kept a pit bull chained to a tree in their front yard and whose yard looks very white-trash. But I don't mow my lawn one week too long and they get their underroos in a knot.

    I also have two rental properties around me, so the turnover is pretty high on negihbors.

    My yard is flanked on the streetside by juniper bushes, which appears to be the deisgnated neighborhood depository for trash and beer cans. Of course I found a skateboard there, too. Thank you very much. I am sure my son will enjoy it in a few years.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

  14. #14
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    in a meeting
    Posts
    8,529

    Dude!

    I have a party neighborhood -

    Friday nights we usually have dinner and drinks with one or more of about 4 families on the street

    We have Progressive dinners about 4 times a year - one is tomorrow night

    There is a book club for the women and we are trying to get the guys to start a card game

    all in a subdivision of 2 acre lots on a public way surrounded by dedicated open space (we have 6 acres behind us) located 6 miles from downtown, an un-walkable (because there's no sidewalks, yet) 1.5 miles to 2 villages

    we have lucked out in our marriage about places we have lived in, we had a similar neighborhood but with lots less than 10,000 SF in Massachusetts

  15. #15
         
    Registered
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Funky Town, CO.
    Posts
    432
    I have some great neighbors. I live in a neighborhood that was established in the 1920s and has a mix of university faculty,staff, other gov. workers, a few students, some construction workers and a few retirees.

    This last Christmas I was out of state when we were hit by two snow storms that dropped well over 2 feet of snow. I expected that I would have to shovel for a couple of hours just to get my car in the driveway when I got home on New Years day. However, when I got back my driveway and all my sidewalks were clear. What a great gift. That sure saved my back. Since then I have tried to do some pay back by shoveling other neighbors sidewalks.

    I also have a couple of strange neighbors. One elderly woman has dug up her back yard in an effort to remove all the rocks from her property. Even if the rocks are four feet underground! It looks like a grave yard back there with holes and mounds of earth. Some times I see her digging a hole with only her head showing above ground. She then screens the soil and removes the rocks but never seems to fill in the holes.

  16. #16
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
    Registered
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Wishing I were in Asia somewhere!
    Posts
    9,810
    Blog entries
    5
    I live in grad family housing which is largely populated by foreign grad students. In my building I have to one side a Chinese couple that cooks stinky food and never acknowledges anyone even if you say hello. The couple across from me is also Chinese and they have twins that are about 2 years old and a disabled daughter who is 4..the little ones always knock on my door when she puts them outside because they are bugging her. Their neighbors are Korean, I've seen the man once. I don't think they sleep because the lights are on at all hours of night and day. My upstairs neighbor moved out in the middle of the night because she was behind on rent and very dirty (la cucaracha!). There is another Chinese couple who are pleasant when you see them in the parking lot, and there is a young single mother with ghetto friends that make all sorts of noise on Friday and Saturday nights. My favorite neighbor is the other lone caucasian lady who is a PhD candidate in French and her French hubby who is a jazz musician and plays the upright bass. I've seen him play a show and he's very good.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  17. #17
    Cyburbian
    Registered
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Section 14-12-7, 3rd PM
    Posts
    2,096
    Two doors west – Former HS teacher, we get along great
    One door west – Bible thumping vegetarians (NTTAWWT) with kids same age as our older ones, get along, share tools, and talk gardening, but no bbq’s or beer drinking.
    One door east – naked people moved out, ex-husband of naked people fixing place to sell.
    Two doors east – HS acquaintances, now good friends.
    Across street – vacant, MIL and SIL are thinking of buying (God help me)
    Across street (west) – Drug dealer . Keeps his place up, friendly, walks dog, waves, etc. But there is little doubt about his occupation.
    Behind me – new neighbors last year, seems nice but did some remodeling and stacked/dumped the demo debris in the back of their yard and it’s been there for a year.

    Overall, it’s an OK neighborhood, but there is room for improvement.

  18. #18
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Clayobyrne, CB
    Posts
    2,581
    Quote Originally posted by Tranplanner View post
    Got along okay with our neighbours at the old place. Mixture of older and younger people.

    We're renting an apartment right now while we get settled and I want to seriously injure both the upstairs neighbours (who must weigh 500lbs each and wear combat boots all the time) and the guy next door who has friends over 2-3 times a week until the wee hours. His balcony, where his buddies go to smoke, is in close proximity to our bedroom window.
    Do you live next door? You just described our situation to a T. We do love renting though. Especially while housing prices stagnate and begin to plummet.

  19. #19
    To my west is a nice DINK couple -- they're a couple years older than us and move in different circles, so while we're friendly, there's no socializing between us.

    To my east is a duplex -- the downstairs tenant has been there since the day it was first rented --( in 1965! )-- and is as sweet as she can be, while the guy upstairs comes off as a probable paedophile. No social interaction there.

    Across the street, in order, is an older SF with a nasty mongrel yappy dog that barks at everything including the wind; a nice younger couple rehabbing a home built in 1856 and run down for the last 25+ years; a former councilman whose idea of historic architectural integrity is a painted-lady scheme on a foursquare (prominently featuring the color pink); and, a rental that's, ...well, ...uh, ...peculiar. Aside from the shared commiseration in rehabbing wrecked old building with the young couple across the street, no socialization there either.

    Of course, our neighbors probably have colorful things to say about us so, it's all good.
    On pitching to Stan Musial:
    "Once he timed your fastball, your infielders were in jeopardy."
    Warren Spahn

  20. #20
         
    Registered
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Here
    Posts
    3,519
    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    and there is a young single mother with ghetto friends that make all sorts of noise on Friday and Saturday nights.
    HA! Now I know what the neighbors say about me

  21. #21
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
    Registered
    Feb 2004
    Location
    on my 15 minute break
    Posts
    18,044
    From the sounds of it, I'd like it if Budgie and luckless pedestrian were my neighbors. They've got a sweet deal going with their current neighbor relations and that's what I wish we could have.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

  22. #22
    Cyburbian cch's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Machesney Park, IL
    Posts
    1,437
    ZMAN, your neighborhood sounds like mine, minus the hanging-out-together part. Most every house is headed by dual-income middle class couples between 30-50 years old, with kids from infants to teenagers. We all say "hi" and wave to each other, but I have no idea what any of the them do for living, and only know the first names of a couple of them. The only time we chat is when we happen to be working or playing in our yards at the same time. When I'm outside playing with my daughter some of the neighbor kids come up and talk with me, but I rarely see their parents. But, we all look out for each other's kids, and we do a little fourth of july parade every year, where kids decorate their bikes and wagons, and dogs, etc., where we get in some small talk with neighbors, only to go another year without seeing them again.

    The neighbors directly behind us are the oddballs, probably in their 40s with no kids. In nice weather they eat dinner on their deck, which we can see directly out from our dining area, they sip wine with their dinner and don't utter a word to each other. And when a neighbor girl started using their side yard and our yard as a shortcut to get to her friend's house last winter, this neighbor behind us built up a giant wall of snow to block her from walking beside his house , and it looked like it had a note stuck to it.

  23. #23
    Cyburbian Fat Cat's avatar
    Registered
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Rockwood, MI
    Posts
    1,419

    Fat Cat

    Over the years we have lived in easily ten homes some ranging from a year to a couple of years and two for a few years
    but we have been in our current home for a few years
    We are lucky, we get along with all of our neighbors, one neighbor has a key to our house and watchs while we are gone, another snowblows our sidewalk if I am at a night meeting or if I left early and did not have time to do it before I left for work. The one who does the snow blowing is a retired college professor and the one with the key is retired tool and die, we all tend to get together for yard parties in the summer. Mixture of professionals and union trades. Hope we can stay in this neighborhood, but it looks like another move might becoming up.
    One of the previous places that we lived in for a few years was pretty much the same, a bunch of the neighbors had a weekly card game, we even put gates in the fences between the yards so that we could go between yards. We used to get together in one of the basements on Saturday and have dances, while the children stayed upstairs with the older children baby sitting the younger children. Mixture of blue collar, professional, and small business owners. Hated to move from there but our jobs took us away from that area.
    I don't recall them telling us when we were in school that we would probably relocate a few times. Especially if you are both professionals in different fields.
    When I worked for the the feds, we would get tips on where and how to relocate so that when we got transfered, (this was unofficial, by the "veterans who knew from experience) so we knew what to look for. This has come in handy since then. It has helped so that we don't lose money when we are a house for only a year or so

  24. #24
    Cyburbian jmello's avatar
    Registered
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Clayobyrne, CB
    Posts
    2,581
    Quote Originally posted by cch View post
    ZMAN, your neighborhood sounds like mine, minus the hanging-out-together part. Most every house is headed by dual-income middle class couples between 30-50 years old, with kids from infants to teenagers. We all say "hi" and wave to each other, but I have no idea what any of the them do for living, and only know the first names of a couple of them. The only time we chat is when we happen to be working or playing in our yards at the same time. When I'm outside playing with my daughter some of the neighbor kids come up and talk with me, but I rarely see their parents. But, we all look out for each other's kids, and we do a little fourth of july parade every year, where kids decorate their bikes and wagons, and dogs, etc., where we get in some small talk with neighbors, only to go another year without seeing them again.
    This makes me realize two things:
    1) How tremendously unfriendly we are to our neighbors
    2) How disfunctional all the neighborhoods I have lived in have been

    Our block now is quite a mix.

    To our right is an abadoned house owned by a guy in Richmond. A crackhead recently snuck in and sawed off a piece of live copper gas pipe. I discovered the resulting leak and called the FD.

    Just beyone that house is an elderly woman who probably bought her house in 1950. She wears daisy-dukes and fishnet stocking and sings Negro Spirituals in the middle of the street. Half of her house is plywood.

    To our left is another two-family just like ours but full of immature college kids. They bbq and tap kegs in the small front yard every once in awhile.

    Just past them is a stereotypical lesbian couple. One is old and one is young. One is feminine and one is not. They drive a Suburu stationwagon and own a large German shephard.

    Across the street is a huge historic mansion complete with guest house and in-ground pool. I believe it is actually three rental units. There's a young couple with a dachund and an older couple.

    Next to them is the crazy Aussie and his American wife. They got a real good deal on their house last year from an African-American family who probably lived there since 1950 as well. For the last year, he has been working on the house 24-7. Rain or shine he is out there painting, sanding and nailing, usually with an assortment of hired day-laborers.

    We have only talked to the college kids and the Aussie. He liked our friends' scooters.

  25. #25
    Our neighborhood is a mix of two family and single family homes. Our downstairs neighbors have lived in the building for 40 years or more. They lived in the unit we are in now, and raised their children there. Their oldest son owns the property now. Excellent couple, but the children are a little dingy. Most of the people are friendly enough - will say hello if you initiate. Hey, it's Boston - whadddya want?

    There's a smattering of children who have grown up as we've lived on the street, and spend a lot of time outside when the weather allows. It's not unusual to see a small knot of them playing through everyone's backyards, making up some wild hide and seek or role-playing game on the fly. It's a lot of fun to watch them as they tear around the street, yelling and screaming. I'm glad for it, too. Kids playing through neighbors' yards are a natural deterrent to mischief-makers. No one wants to chance coming upon a 9 year old boy with plastic sword yelling at the top of his lungs. A couple of new families with small children have moved in so there will be another group of kiddies who will soon be riding their bikes up and down the sidewalk.

    We do have some less than savory characters, though. One guy got arrested on federal charges for some illegal immigration scam, another has a small Oxycontin business going, as well as the crazy uncle who forgets to take his meds and then stands in the middle of the sidewalk singing pieces of songs sounding like a drunken Jimmy Durante. He gets nasty if you walk by and try to ignore him.

+ Reply to thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

More at Cyburbia

  1. What to do about the new neighbors?
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 16
    Last post: 28 Feb 2013, 2:51 PM
  2. Planners as neighbors
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 29
    Last post: 26 Aug 2005, 11:09 AM
  3. Article: When Neighbors Go Bad
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 12 Jul 2004, 5:06 PM
  4. Crazy neighbors
    Land Use and Zoning
    Replies: 5
    Last post: 08 Aug 2002, 3:45 PM
  5. Neighbors and view corridors
    Friday Afternoon Club
    Replies: 4
    Last post: 19 Feb 1999, 9:46 AM