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Thread: Animal Foster Care

  1. #1
         
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    Animal Foster Care

    Was just surfing around Craigslist (yes I relaly do work sometimes ) and stupid me went to the "pet" section. I know my coworkers could here me ohhhing and ahhing over th eprecious pups and grown dogs who's pics were posted for adoption.
    Anyway one of the local shelters had about 15 posts showing different animals for adoptions saying that they were in dire need of people to adopt these animals, their shelter is full and many of them will be put down if not adopted. Well I have two dogs and two kids and not really any time for any additional "family" members at the moment. However, the boys and I will be wanting a new pup in the near future (the lab is old) but not right this minute.
    So I emailed the shelter, told them I could not commit to adopting a pup as a "forever" home but would be happy to foster any dog that gets along with other dogs and children if would keep it from being put down.
    Has anyone here ever fostered a dog? I think it would be really great to give a dog a better temporary home than those cold cages or concrete floors in the shelters....I think it puts the animal in a better state of mind when being adopted to a "forever home" ...thoughts? experiences?

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    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    My mom and I fostered a cat for a couple of months. Fostering is way better than a shelter for the animal and actually increases its chances for adoption. Fostering an animal allows the animal to be socialized in a way that is much more like an adoptive home rather than being in a cage in a shelter and let out a couple times a day. While it's hard to give the animal up to its new family, too me its well worth it.
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

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    Cyburbian Plus dandy_warhol's avatar
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    i haven't done it but when/if i ever get a home it is something i'd like to do. though i do think i might have a difficult time saying goodbye to them. so i'd probably end up with 50 dogs.

    my boss' family is fostering a litter of kittens at the moment. i'd probably end up with 100 kitties if i did that.
    In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends. -Martin Luther King Jr.

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    Cyburbian Big Owl's avatar
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    Well, we have done and are a foster home for both childern and pets.... and we have kept everything that has came in the door. Fortunately, it has only been one dog and one beautiful little girl... We have conciously decided that once the adoption is finial that this is it for both types of foster care... well for a while.

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    My downstairs neighbor has been fostering orphan malamutes (sp?). After her huge male died a year ago, she fostered a young female (who was aborable), then she fostered an even huger male (he is just gigantic but a teddy bear and she eventually adopted him) Now she is fostering a really abused (mostly emotional) former puppy mill female who is very very timid (understandably).

    For my wife and I, we would not be adverse to it (theortically), but realisitcally niether of us really have the time or patience for more than our current pooch and the baby on the way.

    But if one of us was able to stay at home (not work), then that could change.

    Though, I do so miss having a nice cat around.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

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    Cyburbian jmac's avatar
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    We've never fostered an animal from a shelter, but that is an appealing idea.

    We are currently "fostering" a friend's cat after he was almost busted for having her in his apartment, which is a violation of his lease. She's been around for a couple weeks, and I wouldn't mind adopting her since she is finally getting along with our cat. All of the hard work is done.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian MD Planner's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by kjelsadek View post
    My mom and I fostered a cat for a couple of months. Fostering is way better than a shelter for the animal and actually increases its chances for adoption. Fostering an animal allows the animal to be socialized in a way that is much more like an adoptive home rather than being in a cage in a shelter and let out a couple times a day. While it's hard to give the animal up to its new family, too me its well worth it.
    This is pretty much exactly what I would have said. It is tough because you get emotionally attached but you really do increase their chances of adopotion by socializing the foster animal and also discovering just what they will and won't tolerate. Some dogs just don't like cats as an example. People like to know that kind of stuff beforehand. After volunteering at a shelter, there is nothing more heartbreaking than to see an adopted animal returned to the shelter.
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    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    On the other side of the fence, we adopted our second dog from a group that is essentially a foster care setup. They go to the pound and select dogs slated for "destruction" that appear adoptable and place them in homes temporarily. I think the socialization aspect of this is a very positive thing. We came across Jack where the group had set up outside a PetSmart. He was still very skittish when he came to us (would not come in the doorway for almost a month), but now he is a great, if a bit "enthusiastic," dog. Still a little nervous, but he is part pointer..
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    Cyburbian Jeff's avatar
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    Used to foster greyhounds before I had kids, now we just adopt them after they have been fostered.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Trail Nazi's avatar
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    Animal foster care can be very difficult because sometimes the animal may need special care or came from a situation that might have caused the animal to have behavior issues. I belong to my breed's specialty club and it is amazing how many animals go into foster care because people don't know that much about the breed and later discover the issues associated with the breed. If you decide to foster, you may need to be specific about the type of animal and situation that it came from to avoid some pitfalls that may occur. (For example, do not want yorkis (just picking a breed as an example - not saying yorkis have this issue) because of possible agression problems that are known to the breed.)

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