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Thread: Dual degrees - urbanism and landscape architecture (was: Wondering)

  1. #1
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    Dual degrees - urbanism and landscape architecture (was: Wondering)

    Recently I came up on the idea that I can finish my urbanism studies, and then do a specialization on the faculty of landscape architecture.. I`m wondering what do you think of this joint (if I can say "joint" in this phrase). I think it could be a nice junction and I could do more stuff whith the both diplomas.. I`m not sure if you are familiar with the term specialization, but here you can finish one year studies with some practice on almost any faculty you want.. So I just ask about opinion..
    Thank you!!

  2. #2
    Cyburbian
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    Are you going currently in school in Serbia?

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    Yeah, third year student..
    In the next semester I`ll have to decide between urbanism, architecture and constructions, and I think it will be urbanism, but don`t yet know..

  4. #4
    Cyburbian
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    I wish academic tracks in the United States were that flexible. Can you just take a semeter or two of classes in architecture or landscape architecture, graduate with a diploma in those fields and call yourself an architect or a landscape architect?

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    Oh no no no... You can`t call yourself both architect and landscape architect, but you can call your self, let me see, I don`t know if the translation will be correct, in official terms you would be Master Of architecture, in footer would be said I guess master of urbanism, but a specialist for landscape architecture.. You wouldn`t have a degree in landscape architecture, but.. Oh it`s too complicated to explane.. I will ask someone, and then I could explane, because you too have term for that, I mean for specialist in some domain, and than I`m sure you`ll know what it is about.. You have that opportunity too.. Well educatin sistem in serbia is too complicated to explane, because we are just recently studying in the new sistem and nobody know what it`ll be like.. But anyway, do you think that could be + for me, if I decide not to build my profesional career here... If it could be the mix of urbanism and landscape architecture, but not landscape architect..

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    I see now that i didn`t get your question.. I`m now in third year of my architecture studies... After that I`ll get my bachelor degree... After that I`ll go on my master studies for two more years... And then get the master degree.. And THAN I could take I think 2 semesters (which wouldn`t just be theoretical, I would have to have some practise too), and than I could get a degree for Specialist.. And another thing I wanna ask.. Do people in your countries, which study architecture have some obligatory practice while they are studying, and what does it look like..
    ( I`m once again excusing myself for my bad english, and if you cannot understand something, I would be very happy if you asked me for explanation.. Thank you!!)

  7. #7
    Cyburbian
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    For licensure requirements as an architect in the United States, you can check out the American Institute of Architects at www.aia.org. Or someone who is a practicing architect on this forum might be able to help you.

    For landscape architecture (and I am still learning more and more each day because I want to practice as both a landscape architect and a planner), to call yourself a landscape architect in most states, you have to graduate from either an undergraduate program in landscape architecture (minimum 5 years) or a graduate program (minimum of 3 years if you have an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution in some other field besides landscape architecture). The landscape architecture degree, either undergrad or grad, must be accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accrediation Board (NAAB). After school, most states require you to work under the supervision of a Registered Landscape Architect (RLA) for so many years before you are elligble to take the LARE (Landscape Architecture Registration Examination). This is a five part exam that is not administered on the same day (each section takes several months of study). After this, you can call yourself a landscape architect. Colorado, Vermont, and Washington, DC allow you to call yourself a landscape architect right after graduating from an NAAB accredited landscape architecture program. I imagine there is also continuing education requirements. You can still practice landscape architecture without being registered (although some communities like Chicago forbid it). These people might be called landscape designers instead of landscape architects. If you want to call yourself a landscape architect in another state, you will most likely have to pass the LARE exam for that state.

    Planners are not licensed, but don't quote me. We have a certificiation process instead, which comes from the AICP (American Institute of Certified Planners), which is part of the American Planning Association. Certification adds a tremendous amount of professional credibility as a planner. To be elligble to take the AICP exam, you don't even need a college degree (however, there is a catch-22: you have to working as a full-time planner for 8 years. I am not sure if working overseas as a planner would qualify you (interesting topic for further research)). However, most planners who take the AICP exam have graduated from either an undergraduate or a graduate program that is recognized by the Association of Collegiate Schools in Planning (ACSP). ACSP accredited schools, unlike NAAB schools for landscape architects, are also offered in Canada, Isreal?, and a few other countries. You also have to be working for so many years (2 for planners with a graduate degree in planning and 3 for planners with an undergraduate degree) before you are ellgible to sit on the exam. There is also continuting education requirements to maintain your AICP status (which has been the source of debate on some of the other forums on this website).

    Unfortunately, if you want to practice planning with architecture or landscape architecture, you pretty much have to follow the requirements in each field if you want to move up the ladder.

    Whew, I hope I got all my facts straight

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