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Thread: Need recommendations on buffering in residential and industrial areas

  1. #1
    Cyburbian Hawkeye66's avatar
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    Need recommendations on buffering in residential and industrial areas

    We have a street in town that has R-1 Zoning and Homes on one side, and on the other we have M class Industrial Use. Mainly a food processing company.

    Parking is an issue for the company, and the set up in general is not satisfactory. Any suggestions on how we can upgrade the street to better accomodate them, yet provide a better buffer for the residential area?

  2. #2

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    Does the client have deep pockets?
    http://www.universitybusiness.com/vi...?articleid=626 has some examples of university/college parking where they beautified the parking, both surface lots, and parkades. Good landscaping can mitigate the parking a good deal, making it look less like a sea of asphalt. Even a small amount will help. (If you had lots of land, you could place a big earth berm in front of the parking)

    You might ask as well for the client to explore TDM measures to reduce the amount of parking required. These options can be a lot cheaper than having to provide additional parking stalls. Often there's a pent-up demand for these measures even for blue-collar businesses; if the company helps the employees out (dedicated carpool stalls, helping fund bus passes, providing bike lockers, showers, etc.) then they may be able to reduce their parking demand.

  3. #3
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    How much land is available in the right-of-way, and on the manufacturing site? I have seen a street developed with right-angled parking on one side adjacent to manufacturing, with residential on the other side. It is not that ideal a situation. If enough land could be assembled, you might fit in two 12-foot driving lanes, a heavily-landscaped island, and then a one-way lane with 45-degree angled parking. The landscaped island would be a buffer so that the residential uses are not looking at parked cars. The narrow street would eliminate on-street parking in front of their homes. You might fit this into about seventy feet.
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    Cyburbian
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    Is there existing fencing on the manufacturing side? If so, what is the height, length, material, and opacity of the existing fence?

  5. #5
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    I like Cardinal's suggestion.

    Plus, was the industrial complex there before or after the residents? If before, they need to relax. They did choose to live across the street from a factory.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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  6. #6
    Cyburbian Hawkeye66's avatar
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    Its not a wide street. Its your typical 2 lane city street. Not narrow, but not extra wide either. The angle parking idea may have some merit.

    The residents are not making a stink. Its just a situation that I notice here that I think could be better.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Tobinn's avatar
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    What does the factory look like along the street?

    I like the idea of angled parking for the factory. I see a lot of communities are using back-in angled parking which seems to have lots of pluses and not many, if any, minuses.

    Maybe a couple of pics are in order to get a feel for the situation.

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Cardinal's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Tobinn View post
    What does the factory look like along the street?

    I like the idea of angled parking for the factory. I see a lot of communities are using back-in angled parking which seems to have lots of pluses and not many, if any, minuses.

    Maybe a couple of pics are in order to get a feel for the situation.
    Back-in angled parking is an interesting idea. I wonder if it would be easy to train people to use it, though, and especially when the stripes are covered in snow. Do you have any pictures of places where it has been done.
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  9. #9
    Cyburbian Streck's avatar
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    You said Residential Zoning. Does this mean that residential housing is not in place yet?

    If not, in addition to the landscaping in the ROW on the Industrial side as previously mentioned, I recommend considering changing a strip of the R zoning along the throrughfare to Office Zoning. This is a good Use buffer in that there is not much noise or trash generated by office use, and landscaping can be required inside the Office Zone plus a landscape buffer between the Office Zone and the remaining R zone.

    If the R zone is too narrow to permit some land to be used as Office zoning, I recommend that the R zone require the houses to face inward to an interior residential street (with landscaped back yards to the existing thoroughfare) (no driveways to the thoroughfare - only a street access). This residential street could then have access to the thoroughfare, if there is no other connecting feeding street.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Hawkeye66's avatar
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    Its an old situation

    This is not new. The housing is 40 years old. for whatever reason, it was set up next to an M area. Done when I was baby or so most likely.

    At this point I am trying to just deal with it and improve it as best I can for both the residents and the food processor, who is a good corporate citizen.

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Streck's avatar
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    Ah, since the housing is already in place, I recommend that you consider a "neutral ground" or median strip in the center of the two lanes. Michigan Ave in Chicago has the median raised with concrete knee walls about three feet high with lush planting and some trees. It really psychologically breaks up the massive paved thoroughfare.

    This would aesthetically help the residential area, may partially and psychologically be a partial visual screen of the manufacturing area, and block half of the traffic road and motor noise on the far side of the street from the residential.

    I do not know what the parking "issue" is, so it is hard to address that for you.
    Would a similar planter knee-wall be appropriate along the manufacturer area side?
    What problem are you trying to solve there?

  12. #12
    Cyburbian Tobinn's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Cardinal View post
    Back-in angled parking is an interesting idea. I wonder if it would be easy to train people to use it, though, and especially when the stripes are covered in snow. Do you have any pictures of places where it has been done.
    You know, I don't have any pictures of this myself and have not seen it done in my neck of the woods; I've only read about it. From what I've read the public training aspect is apparently pretty easy and it's easier to back into angled parking than 90-degree parking and much easier to pull forwards out of an angled space than backing out of an angled space.

    I think this might be the first document I read on this: http://www.wgmgroup.com/pdf/BackIn_AngleParking.pdf

    I found this write up as well: http://www.saveourlandsaveourtowns.o...toPennDOT1.pdf

  13. #13
    Cyburbian Hawkeye66's avatar
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    Here is a picture of the area

    As you can see, there is not a lot of space.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mill from Elm.jpg  

  14. #14
    Cyburbian
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    I would recommend a landscaped buffereyard (5'-10' in width) with a mixture of plant materials (shrubs, ornamental trees, canopy trees, evergreen trees, groundcover, and prairie grasses). I woudl also add canopy trees at least 3-4" in caliper within the foundation landscaping area of the building. This won't screen the loading area, but will help to soften the architectural features of the building.

    Looks like this is an arterial road (is it maintained by the municipality or the county/state?). If so, you might have limits as to waht you can and cannot do within the public ROW, so the landscaped median is out of the question.

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