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Thread: Cut and Shoot, Texas: a place that lives up to its name

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    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Cut and Shoot, Texas: a place that lives up to its name

    You ain't RUGGED! enough to live in Cut and Shoot, bo-ah. (click click) Now GIT!

    Those expecting a quant Western-style town with false front buildings, horses attached to hitching posts, and cowboys everywhere are going to be disappointed.

    Cut and Shoot is a classic "town next door" in the traditional Cyburbia definition, a place where it seems like the local zoning code allows only vehicle-related businesses in commercial areas, and prefabricated metal structures are required by architectural regulations. One would think that community leaders would build on the sense of place that is offered by having such a unique name. Rather, they decided to let the market take its course, and become a wide spot in the road, with a strip lined almost exclusively by low-end auto repair shops and other marginal mechanical commercial uses. There's none of the "quaint seen-much-better-days downtown" core seen in so many other small Texas towns, but instead metal building after metal building, with varying degrees of maintenance and neglect. Many of the uploaded images are both in the Houston and Worst Case Scenario galleries.

    The highlights of Cut and Shoot? The name, and the smell of the barbecue smoke seen in the last photo.

    From Wikipedia:

    Cut and Shoot is a city in eastern Montgomery County, Texas, United States, about 6 miles east of Conroe and 40 miles north of Houston. The population was 1,158 at the 2000 census, at which time it was a town; the community only became a city in August 2006.

    According to one local legend, Cut and Shoot was named after a 1912 community confrontation that almost led to violence. According to differing versions of the story, the dispute was either over:

    * The design of a new steeple for the town's only church,
    * The issue of who should be allowed to preach there, or
    * The conflicting land claims among church members.

    Whatever the circumstances were, a small boy at the scene reportedly declared "I'm going to cut around the corner and shoot through the bushes in a minute!" This statement apparently stayed in the residents' minds and was eventually adopted as the town's name.

    The town of Cut and Shoot gained fame when local boxer Roy Harris, a heavyweight contender fought Floyd Patterson for the heavyweight title in 1958. Harris appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated and was featured in Life Magazine. So much mail was addressed to "Roy Harris, Cut and Shoot, Texas" that the U. S. Postal Service granted a franchise post office to the town.

    Population statistics were not reported for the community until the mid-1970s, when the number of residents was 50. By 1980 the incorporated community reported a population of 809, had a new city hall and supported both a school and several businesses.


































































    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  2. #2
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Beauty is in the eye of the beerholder. And I would need quite a few to find beauty there!
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    I hear Strangle and Stab, TX has a lovely museum.

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    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    I love place name stories. New Mexico has an entire book devoted to them.

    Here's the story I heard about how the Andice exit (Georgetown, off I-35 north of Austin):

    When the interstate highway was going in, it followed the route of an existing road in this area. In the area near where the next exit was to be stood an old sign that, at one time, advertised "Beer and Ice." However, the left hand side had fallen down, leaving only the words "and ice."

    Here is another one about Truth or Consequence (T or C), New Mexico (maybe this was touched on elsewhere, but its worth repeating).
    Truth or Consequences is a spa city in and the county seat of Sierra County, New Mexico, United States.[1] As of the 2000 census, the population was 7,289. It is commonly known within New Mexico as T or C.

    Originally named Hot Springs, the city changed its name to Truth or Consequences, the title of a popular NBC radio program. In 1950, Ralph Edwards, the host of the radio quiz show Truth or Consequences announced that he would air the program from the first town that renamed itself after the show. Hot Springs, NM won the honor. Ralph Edwards came to the town during the first weekend of May for the next fifty years.
    Evidently, they are working on changing the name back to Hot Springs. The town has attracted a number of notable artists and associated wannabe artists from other parts of country. They have reopened closed storefronts and generated a little gallery zone. Its not much, but I think the town sees that they could enhance their tourist draw with a more bucolic name.

    One of the best parts of the town is that you can stay in a number of Rte. 66 era motor courts that have hot springs on the properties, use of which is part of your room cost. Its pretty cool.

    Oh, and I once stayed with a friend in his family's summer home in Slaughter Beach, DE. It was between the ocean and some inland swampy bogs. It smelled like sulfur...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  5. #5
    Cyburbian
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    Quote Originally posted by wahday View post

    Evidently, they are working on changing the name back to Hot Springs. The town has attracted a number of notable artists and associated wannabe artists from other parts of country. They have reopened closed storefronts and generated a little gallery zone. Its not much, but I think the town sees that they could enhance their tourist draw with a more bucolic name.
    My understanding is that there's been talk of changing the name back ever since they changed it in the first place. Personally, I think it would be a mistake. There are loads of towns called "Hot Springs" but "Truth or Consequences" is unique, and uniquely memorable.

  6. #6
    Cyburbian b3nr's avatar
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    Wow. Delightful. Such high quality architecture.

    The town it's next to, Conroe, has the strangest ring road i've ever seen. Worth a look on google maps.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian Rygor's avatar
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    Yikes! That place is a planner/urban designer/architect's worst nightmare. Unscreened outdoor storage, cars and objects in ROW, hand painted signs everywhere (and way too many of them), all the unadorned metal buildings, poorly maintained properties. Ugh.

    Apparently, they can't even all agree on the name of the place. I saw:

    Cut and Shoot
    Cut 'n Shoot
    Cut & Shoot
    Cut-n-Shoot
    Cut 'n' Shoot

    "When life gives you lemons, just say 'No thanks'." - Henry Rollins

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    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    I can't believe this is the name of a real place!

    Is there a manufacturer of Butler buildings and garden sheds nearby?? Seems like an industry this city firmly supports.

  9. #9
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    I wasn't going out of my way to pick out only the ugly buildings. The original post pictures most of the development along Cut and Shoot's main drag.

    I would have explored some of the residential neighborhoods more, but looking on Google Earth, they're mostly subdivisions consisting entirely of single-wide mobile homes on large lots, many of them surrounded by "project cars" and "stuff I have around just in case I need it". Those are the kinds of places where a planner driving around taking photos is likely to get cut and shot.

    In many of these little Texas towns, driving around, stopping, taking photos, and getting out of the car for a better shot will often be met with friendly waves. In Cut and Shoot, it's probably going to be a hail of gunfire that will greet me.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  10. #10
    Cyburbian Plus Veloise's avatar
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    City looks okay, and there's a nice Western vibe in the covered wagon self-serve produce stand. And the red barn mailbox.

    You got some duplicates, there, boss; I see at least two of the Tarjeta Telefonico images. (And I haven't been in the pool with the wine.)

  11. #11
    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    What's the deal with these horrific-looking message signs with the pointing arrow? Is this a Texas thing? The wheels are a nice touch

    http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/data...d_shoot_17.jpg


    http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/data...d_shoot_22.jpg

    http://www.cyburbia.org/gallery/data...d_shoot_28.jpg

  12. #12
    Cyburbian stroskey's avatar
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    Don't worry, it's an Iowa thing, too.

  13. #13
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    What's the deal with these horrific-looking message signs with the pointing arrow? Is this a Texas thing? The wheels are a nice touch
    Wow ... how young are you? Those are portable signs; the bane of planners in the 1970s and 1980s. They're banned in the vast majority of cities and towns now, but they're still common in some small "town next door" type places with lax land use regulations, and, believe it or not, they're still extremely popular in Canada.
    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

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    Cyburbian hilldweller's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Wow ... how young are you? Those are portable signs; the bane of planners in the 1970s and 1980s. They're banned in the vast majority of cities and towns now, but they're still common in some small "town next door" type places with lax land use regulations, and, believe it or not, they're still extremely popular in Canada.
    Honesty, I've never seen a sign like that anywhere in the northeast. Even in rural areas.

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    Cyburbian Richmond Jake's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Veloise View post
    ....You got some duplicates, there, boss; I see at least two of the Tarjeta Telefonico images. (And I haven't been in the pool with the wine.)
    I think I just got dissed.


    Also, boss posted the same image twice of the light green metal building with the yellow "Truck Parts" sign. Gotcha, eagle eyed Vel.
    Annoyingly insensitive

  16. #16
    Cyburbia Administrator Dan's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by hilldweller View post
    Honesty, I've never seen a sign like that anywhere in the northeast. Even in rural areas.
    Buffalo: always 25 years behind the times.





    Growth for growth's sake is the ideology of the cancer cell. -- Edward Abbey

  17. #17
    Cyburbian ICT/316's avatar
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    I always get a kick out these towns with great names. I always think about the fact that if they have a Police Department, then their patrol cars and uniform patches will say that name on it. "Cut and Shoot Police". I always thought that "Gas Police", was funny in Kansas.

    Bill

  18. #18

    Wow

    I use to live there when I was younger, it's really just a great town.
    Yess things can look bad, but really the school there is ranked number seven in the state of Texas for academics. We aren't really that dumb we're just aren't concerned what people think...Just saying we haven't really sold out on ourselves like many others!!!!

  19. #19
    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by volleyballchick8 View post
    ...Just saying we haven't really sold out on ourselves like many others!!!!
    Just busy keeping it Real. We hear you.

    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Thanks for the defense of "our town"... Cut and Shoot, Texas, volleyballchick8.

    Yes, I'll agree that a trip down Highway 105 through Cut and Shoot isn't as pretty as a lot of places. But, if you stop and visit with the folks here, you'll probably agree that you've never met a more friendly bunch. And you may be invited in to share a bit of bar-b-que or homemade chicken and dumplin's.

    I have lived in Cut and Shoot since the early 70's and have seen the growth, albeit auto repair shops and sheet metal building, among other businesses along the highway. However, if you look for it you can find wondrous views in the city. I'd like to share an essay I wrote about my community shortly after the horrific disaster of the twin towers.

    The morning is pleasant, in the low 70’s, as I leave for my walk. Although the walk is for the primary purpose of improving my health, there’s no law against enjoying it. Right?

    I live in a small rural community with only one entrance having only two cross streets which dead end into the woods. It is made up of one-acre lots, with some of them still in their natural state, undisturbed by the building of houses.

    There is a town park of about four acres where there is a small ball field with a backstop, a covered pavilion and a few items of playground equipment. The town has built a Town Hall of logs, where the mayor and aldermen handle the town’s business, and which is occupied by the town secretary, the municipal court, and the office of the police chief.

    The town has recently added a few brightly colored picnic tables, inviting passers-by to stop in with their sack lunch for a bit of peace and quiet. A cold drink machine sits in the corner of the pavilion. The dew on the field at the park sparkles brightly.

    As I approach the corner, I am met by the brilliant yellow of the wildflowers (some might call them weeds), growing in the ditch and banking up the other side, with their heads turned toward the rising sun. Interspersed among the yellow heads are beautiful blue wildflowers. If you stop to examine one, you will notice there are thorns covering the stem, but they don’t detract from the beauty of the flowers. Every now and then you will see a purple spike flower and maybe a patch of tiny white flowers covering a plant, resembling a snowball in bloom. Plants about waist high show tiny puffs of fuzz on long branches cascading down, imitating a recent snowfall.

    Squirrels are scampering about, gathering food for the coming winter. They stop and bark and shake their tails at me as I pass. Looking under a pine tree, I see the droppings they have left of pine cones. Someone called them “pine cone leaves”.

    As I get to the highway before turning around, I see the cars and trucks, accompanied by an occasional school bus, speeding by, carrying their occupants to their destinations… work, school, to deliver their products, and occasionally a motor home traveling to unknown adventures. I should say I see the TRUCKS and cars…as here in the Texas Gulf Coast the overwhelming majority of vehicles are trucks. A neighbor on his way to work stops to “howdy” for a minute.

    As I retrace my steps and approach the next corner, I note the Halloween decorations on display at one home. A skeleton is sitting on the chimney, with a ghostly mansion sitting on the lawn, ghosts ascending out the windows. Tombstones with R-I-P inscribed are scattered about the lawn and in the flowerbeds, and skeletal bony fingers protrude out of the ground. A witch has just flown into the side of the garage, her cape, hat and broomstick still visible, and a ghost peers around the post of the mailbox.

    At the corner, I am greeted by Oreo, a black and white spirited dog, who barks at me until I pick up a stick. The stick is not because of a threat, but I know Oreo loves to run by me and bite at the stick as I hold it up.

    I next pass a vine of wild violet-colored morning glories, which have climbed the corner fence post, each one trying to raise their head higher than the next. They trail down to the ground and to the culvert of the driveway. Across the street the morning glories, blue and violet, are twined around the post of the mailbox. The golden rods are bowing their heads with the weight of the brilliant yellow flowers. At the end of the street, grapevines are trailing up into the trees, their tendrils of yellowing leaves highlighted against the darker green of the trees.

    Looking out into the woods, carpeted with a deep layer of oak leaves and pine needles, I see a clump of lilies. I wonder if this was once a home place, and I can visualize the family who may have lived here many years ago. Kids playing in these woods, riding the trees to the ground, making trails and building forts.

    I stop to watch a centipede crossing the road, and catch a glimpse of a rabbit watching me intently. I hear the call of a bird up in a large oak tree, listening for the answer of its mate. I recall the turtle I carried out of the middle of the road, hopeful of lessening his danger of meeting the same fate of the flattened frog. The tallow and sweet gum trees are changing color, showing varying shades of yellow and a hint of red now and then. The sassafras is showing some deep crimson color along with yellowing leaves, and occasionally you see a bit of sumac starting to show it’s color change.

    A carpet of light green low-growing moss surrounds a beautiful old oak, and evidence of child’s play is seen from trails leading through the ditch and into the woods, toward fallen trees just right for climbing. A forgotten ball is lying in the ditch. Golden marigolds in a bed nod sleepily beside a cascade of magenta and yellow-green coleus. The confederate roses, a beautiful dark pink double blossom, are in full bloom, branches leaning from the weight of the blossoms.

    Of course, there are American flags flying from homes and mailboxes along the way, causing my heart to swell with pride in my country, but bringing to mind the recent destruction at the World Trade Center by the terrorists and the following war our country is waging against the perpetrators of such terroristic attacks.

    As I make my way back to my street, I am walking with a spring in my step and a song in my heart. I am thankful to be able to enjoy the smells and beauty of the wildflowers and to listen to the sounds of the wild life; thankful to live in a country with the freedoms we have. And I am listening in my head to the strains of the beautiful song, America The Beautiful.

    O beautiful for spacious skies,
    For amber waves of grain,
    For purple mountain majesties
    Above the fruited plain!
    America! America!
    God shed his grace on thee
    And crown thy good with brotherhood
    From sea to shining sea!

    And may it ever be!

    As someone said, "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder". Maybe.

  21. #21
    Cyburbian mgk920's avatar
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    I agree that while not the World's most photogenic, architectural and touristy kind of a place, Cut and Shoot, TX does have a small-town living/working community sincerity to it that newer master-planned 'Beigeville' suburban subdivisions cannot hope to match. It is a place where everybody knows everybody, honest people value an honest day's work and where a little spontaneity in building adds a flavor that a high-priced architect cannot.

    Mike

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    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    ...and all the children are above average

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    Cyburbian ursus's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Chet View post
    ...and all the children are above average
    OK, Chet it's official: That's the most perfectly timed reference of any post I've read thus far. I'll let you know if anyone unseats you!
    "...I would never try to tick Hink off. He kinda intimidates me. He's quite butch, you know." - Maister

  24. #24
    Cyburbian Emeritus Chet's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by ursus View post
    OK, Chet it's official: That's the most perfectly timed reference of any post I've read thus far. I'll let you know if anyone unseats you!
    HA and I just got done compliment you for a post! LOL

  25. #25
    Cyburbian Linda_D's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by Dan View post
    Buffalo: always 25 years behind the times.
    Not just Buffalo. All of WNY. Of course, WNY isn't really the "Northeast" since it has much more in common with western PA and Ohio than it does with eastern NY and New England.

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