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Thread: Temporal Lobe Seizures:

  1. #1
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Temporal Lobe Seizures:

    I had a string of these over the course of a few months about 2 1/2 years ago, but have not had one since until tonight. It was the same thing as last time: overwhelming sense of deja vu, numbness and tingling running from the side of my head, all the way down my back, half-way into subconsciousness (it's like being in my dreams because it's all familiar, but nothing to do with reality), not being able to talk or move for a few seconds, etc. It lasts about 30-seconds then slowly fades away and I go back into consciousness. I usually remember having an episode but I don't really remember what happens or what I think about. My wife says that I just kind of hold my head and freeze, not really responding when she tries to talk to me and that I kind of make a moaning sound. Needless to say, it freaked her out that it was happening again.

    So, I'm trying to figure out what in the hell is causing this. Last time I went to a neurologist, had all the scans, etc. and they found absolutely nothing wrong with me (no brain injury, no abnormal electrical activity, etc.) The only common thing is that I was training in boxing/kickboxing during the first episodes and have recently started training again. The difference is that the last time I was sparring a lot and taking a lot of shots to the head. My neurologist blamed the sparring as the cause and told me to stop sparring or quit altogether. Well, now I'm training but not sparring yet.. just trying to get back in good shape first.

    Now, I do have two other theories as to what might be happening:

    1. First, I did a lot of acid from when I was 18 until about 20-years-old.... I mean A LOT. I'm not proud of it.. I was young, depressed and didn't care about my life, and it was my escape. Very stupid now that I look back. Anyway, I know that the drug never leaves your system (stored in the spinal chord... I think) and you can be prone to "flash backs", even years and years later. I wonder if the movements in kickboxing (lots of twisting to kick, duck, impacts, etc.) are causing a reaction with the leftover drug and these seizures are actually triggered as part of a flashback phenomena. I didn't think of this until a friend mentioned it.

    2. Second, I was taking anti-depressants for awhile before it started and am still taking them. Started with Effexor and now take Zoloft. I've seen a few studies that since these drugs alter brain chemistry, they could make you succeptible to seizures (and can also cause the flashbacks mentioned above).


    I don't know.... I'm all out of ideas as they found nothing wrong with me the first time, yet this is happening again. Maybe someone on here with experience in these areas could shed some light on the subject.

    Thanks!
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  2. #2
    Cyburbian Jen's avatar
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    That sounds like a firghtening experience. My brother has seizures now and then, Im not sure what they are called, but they are not epilectic seizures. It may be related to a brain injury when he was very young. I know when he is very tired annd rundown they can trigger. He avoids alcohol too.

    Seriously I would eliminate the kickboxing.

    best of luck to you!

  3. #3
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    I'd ditch the kickboxing since it seems to be at least a potential cause. Seizures are some of the most difficult ailments to diagnose--my niece has major epileptic rand mal seizures that have no known cause; the scans show up with abnormal electrical activity all over her brain.

    I am familiar with temporal lobe seizures though. I had a friend that I tried to schedule classes with as frequently as possible because he would have these occur during class. If they were bad enough (last more than one minute), I would take him to the quack shack on campus for observation. The professors were always cool about it.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Seabishop's avatar
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    Not to run your life but I'd have to agree with those who said it may be time to replace kickboxing with another sport. It seems like it might cause more harm than enjoyment for you.

    I've known people who are definitely not the same after the LSD experience. Good luck.

  5. #5
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Thanks to everyone who has replied so far.

    Quote Originally posted by Jen View post
    That sounds like a firghtening experience. My brother has seizures now and then, Im not sure what they are called, but they are not epilectic seizures. It may be related to a brain injury when he was very young. I know when he is very tired annd rundown they can trigger. He avoids alcohol too.
    Wow... you know, I have always been extremely run down when I've had these as well! Usually on days where I can't even hold my eyes open at work. I wonder if this has something to do with it? The fatigue would also explain why it's easier for me to slip into subconsciousness since I'm not fully conscious in the first place.

    As to the mention of kickboxing, as I said, I have not sparred since I started training again (no hits taken to the head). The most contact I've had is holding pads for my training partners, which does jar you a bit when you're holding for body shots, etc., but I'm not getting my brain rattled around. Then again maybe it is enough contact to trigger the problem. Man... I've always been a strong, tough, person. This makes me feel like I'm made out of paper or something
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  6. #6
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Hey Jread,

    I was intrigued by the LSD theory (since I had heard the same before) and found the following on Wikipedia:

    Retention of LSD in spinal fluid

    A meme with particular appeal to anti-drug educators who wish to instill a fear of the potential long-term effects of LSD in their pupils, and also among casual high school age LSD users, is that the body stores crystallized LSD in spinal fluid or in fat cells, which at some point dislodges and causes horrific flashbacks, perhaps years later. Although the body does store some toxins in fat tissue, and residues of some drugs and toxins can be found in spinal fluid, LSD is not among these. It breaks down entirely within the body in hours, and its metabolites are excreted within days.
    So, I think that is probably a pretty unlikely scenario.

    The anti-depressant topic might be worth exploring, though, and I hope you mentioned it to your neurologist when you saw him/her. From what I have gathered (and this is by no means an exhaustive research topic for me), anti-depressent side-effects are also often accompanied by mood swings and other psychological manifestations. I don't know if you are experiencing any of that, but it may be a clue as to whether this is a factor.

    If you are training for kick-boxing, but not sparring, are you doing anything that might jostle your brain? If not, it seems strange to me as I expect much of the training is similar to other sports and is non-contact. But maybe not. If you are knocking your head around (throws on the mat and such), maybe you should consider a lower impact activity...

    I think overall, what other folks have said is true - the cause of seizures are notoriously difficult to diagnose. And I would be careful about letting any of us accurately assess your medical condition - that's a disaster waiting to happen...

    Seriously, though - good luck, this sounds like some scary stuff...
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  7. #7
    Cyburbian jmac's avatar
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    A family member who has had a seizure disorder for many years has identified fatigue as a major trigger for seizures, and is very well controlled with a medication and sufficient rest. It took some time and many neurologist consultations to figure out that this combination worked. Of course, this anecdote may not apply to you at all, but you may be able to figure it out by paying attention to what your body tells you and talking to the doctor.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by jmac; 06 Jun 2007 at 4:06 PM. Reason: added more thoughts...

  8. #8
    I'm afraid I can't help you, but I thank you for bringing this up. I've had several of the symptoms in the past (odd taste in my mouth, slight twitching or jerking of a hand or arm, an inability to grasp things). Some of them, I just thought were odd, and others, I just attributed to being clumsy. They may or may not be related to temporal lobe seizures, but perhaps I should talk to my doctor about this.

  9. #9
    Cyburbian
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    Super Penguin do talk to a doctor about the jerking and twisting. My daughter has myoclonic epilepsy. Myoclonic seizures are just that - jerks, twitches, inablility to grasp.

    Her condition was diagnosed after she had a grand mal seizure. I remember that during the day of the the grand mal, she kept asking me to watch her walk to she if she was weaving. She felt funny all day leading up to it.

    My husband had a seizure, and also experienced the feeling of malaise leading up to it.

    From daughter's doc - fatigue, drugs and alcohol can contribute to a seizure. Also, in females, hormones can cause them.

  10. #10
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jmac View post
    A family member who has had a seizure disorder for many years has identified fatigue as a major trigger for seizures, and is very well controlled with a medication and sufficient rest. It took some time and many neurologist consultations to figure out that this combination worked. Of course, this anecdote may not apply to you at all, but you may be able to figure it out by paying attention to what your body tells you and talking to the doctor.

    Good luck!
    I talked to someone who used to work in a clinic doing EEGs, etc. He brought up the fatigue part and I discovered that this was a factor in my seizures. For instance, the first round of them I was training for a Golden Gloves tournament and sparring a lot, but I was also pushing my body to its limits, not getting enough sleep and was dehydrated all the time. Yesterday, I was extremely fatigued and could barely hold my eyes open at work. I felt really down and had absolutely no energy all day leading up to the seizure. I really do think that this may be the root cause. I'm going to make a point of getting more sleep and drinking lots of water and see if that helps.
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

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