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Thread: Determining one's political party:

  1. #1
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Determining one's political party:

    I would imagine that most planners are Democrats in one way or another, though I've seen on here that there are a few Republicans and Libertarians. I've always known that I am not a Republican, but I'm not sure on the other two. Maybe someone could help:

    1. I'm all for the government staying out of our personal lives: abortion should be legal, gay marriage should be legal, drugs should be legal, free speech, and strict separation of church and state.

    2. I'm all for government policies that equalize income, reduce poverty, provide healthcare and education, etc.

    3. I'm DEFINITELY for government policies that preserve the environment, limit sprawl, provide public transportation, define (and enforce) growth boundaries, etc.

    4. I'm for gun control. I feel guns are just an equalizer for the weak.

    5. I am VERY against illegal immigration (not sure if any party identifies with this)


    I guess I'm a democrat in most ways, though not completely. Any opinions?

    Moderator note:
    I numbered your points so they might be more easily discussed. And for everyone who is replying... Please discuss this as it pertains to the political parties, not politicians or the current administartion. Thanks, Mastiff
    Last edited by Mastiff; 04 Jun 2007 at 7:43 PM.
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  2. #2
    I'm pro-choice, pro-gay marriage (or civil union [but what's that about separate but equal?]), pro-environment, pro-sustainability, and I'm all for social programs, education, healthcare, etc.

    On the other hand, I'm also pro-2nd Amendment, pro-death penalty, anti-illegal immigration, and believe that war is not a good thing (I'd prefer to return to a more isolationist approach), but if we have to fight, we should go at it hard and actually win.

    I'm registered as a Democrat, and I describe myself as a Democrat, since many of those issues carry more weight for me than the Republican issues I side with. Still, I don't have any problem breaking with party lines when it comes to an issue that's important with me. Maybe by the strictest definition I'm independent, or libertarian, or socialist, but the Democrats and the Republicans are the only two parties that really get any play in this country. Hence, I registered Democrat so I can vote in the primary elections for a candidate that actually has a chance at winning.

    But basically, I vote my conscience. I don't care what society wants to consider me.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator kjel's avatar
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    An interesting survey that seems to hit upon major idealogical political touch points. By no means complete it seemed fairly accurate in my case.

    http://www.progressiverockers.com/survey.shtml
    "He defended the cause of the poor and needy, and so all went well. Is that not what it means to know me?" Jeremiah 22:16

  4. #4
    Cyburbian Plus Zoning Goddess's avatar
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    Um... I can see social programs to some extent. But I don't want my income equalized with Mr Mullet Head who occasionally works at the local body shop. He made the choice to be an economic loser. Yeah, pay a living wage (OK, it may be a single-wide trailer, oh well), I get that. But there is NO way I agree with economic equality for people who don't give a damn about improving themselves but just want a 52" HDTV, when I've paid for college and worked for 30 years.

    I agree on gun control. No need for most people to have them. Unless they have some sub-conscious need to kill.

    Agree on illegal immigration. Honestly, if the US can't pay to educate my native-born kid, why am I paying for all the Mexicans?

    Other than that, I'm pretty liberal!

  5. #5
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    No surprise with me:
    1. When it comes to abortion, I follow the "legal, safe & rare" train of thought. I support civil unions for everybody (I discussed my feelings on this in another thread). Despite being religious, I believe all efforts should be made to separate church & state--too many conflicts begin with religion in politics. Government promotion of faith-based organizations makes me very uncomfortable even though so many do good without controversy. I believe marijuana should be legalized & taxed like cigarettes. Other drugs should remain illegal, but not be jailable offenses unless they fail to pay fines or enter rehab. I believe in free speech.
    2. I do not believe in income equalization, but do believe in progressive taxation. Everyone should be given every possible resource to positively contribute to the economy and further themselves, such as discounted tech. school and community college (discounted day care because for many, that cost prevents them from getting needed training). Welfare should come with many strings attached, such as required job training, time limits, etc. with defined performance measures. Reducing poverty has a significant long-term benefit for the entire US economy, and should be a priority. I believe in universal health care as well as public education.
    3. I believe environmental protection, public transit, and limiting suburban sprawl are in the best interest of government. This is not just for environmental and "plannerish" reasons; I believe that governments that do this force the private sector to become more efficient in how they conduct business, saving them money in the long run and building the economy. Also, this allows government to run more efficiently as it does not have to rely on unsustainable capital investment in automobile transportation, which leads to high O&M costs and higher taxes. I also believe it improves citizens' quality of life.
    4. I don't believe gun control is the solution to violent crime in America. Criminals are smart and can circumvent any gun control law. From what I've seen, it has not made a substantial difference in the states that have enacted consealed handguns, one way or the other. I do believe certain guns should not be available to the general public, such as your assault rifles, because there is no good reason for somebody to own one. I have a concealed handgun permit and a handgun, but that is mainly because I like to go with some of the cops to the shooting range and thought the permit would provide good training (and insurance so I don't get in trouble during a traffic stop). I do not routinely carry it--it spends most of its time locked in a safe or traveling to/from the firing range.
    5. I am pro-immigration, but anti illegal immigration. I think the immigration process could be greatly improved through technology, ditching some of the stupid requirements, and adding some new requirements. It should come with certain requirements, such as recent immigrants not being eligible for government assistance for some number of years (with an appeal for extreme situations such as a child's catastrophic illness). All immigrants should have basic command of English, just as I would expect an American immigrating to Germany to have basic command of German. I do not think illegal immigrants are stealing jobs, just taking the jobs that unemployed Americans are too lazy or too proud to do. Theoretically, I'm against any kind of amnesty, but I recognize that our failure to address illegal immigration from Reagan forward has left us with few options for fixing our current illegal immigration problem.

    So there you go. I'm pretty liberal, with the exception of the gun control issue.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  6. #6
    Cyburbian michaelskis's avatar
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    It almost sounds like you are more libertarian than democrat.
    1. Do you want to take money from those who have worked harder and give it to those who want to ‘scam the system’?
    2. Do you want to increase governmental regulation that prevents businesses from succeeding.
    3. How would you feel if they increased your taxes?
    4. Do you feel that the government should pay for hospital treatment for drug addicts and illegal immigration?
    5. What if you made $500,000 per year and you had worked very hard to achieve it. Would you be fine knowing that you paid a much higher percentage than someone making $42,000 a year (Average national family income)
    6. How do you feel about parents disciplining their children in a non-abusive way?
    7. How do you feel about some people making the same as you, even though they don’t do half the work that you do, only because they too are in a union?

    As for me:
    I think that the Government spends too much money on stupid things, and not enough on the right things.
    I think I pay too much on taxes for stupid decisions.
    I think that there are too many people who are too lazy to go out and get a job, so they leach off the government.
    I think that when it some to any religious matter, the government should shut up and stay out of the way.
    I think that if two people, regardless of gender, are in love, they should have some legal measure that would allow them all the same legal rights as those who are married.
    I think that if you’re going to live in the US, you better be here legally, and you better know how to speak English.
    I think that people should get paid for the work that they do and not because they are in a union, or just work a 40 hour work week
    I think that parents should be required to be involved in their children’s educational process.
    I think that the government needs to start spending Gas Tax money on Light Rail and non-auto oriented transportation, and not on Freeways or Highways.
    I think that people should realized that because states recognize driving as a privilege, people should also realize that parking two is a privilege, if you don’t like it, walk.
    I think that no candidate can spend more than 2 million dollars when running for any office. (Hello internet)
    I think that life starts at conception.
    I think that people should be held responsible for their own actions.
    I think that a person on death row should only be permitted one appeal, and it should if he looses, he will be executed within 28 days of being sentenced to death.
    I think that people should not use credit cards or go into debt for anything other than buying a house or business expenses.
    I think that the size of our federal government should be cut in half.
    I think that we should changes to a consumption tax, where we only pay an increased sales tax. Therefore, those who buy more, will still pay more.
    Last edited by michaelskis; 05 Jun 2007 at 1:40 PM.
    Invest in the things today, that provide the returns tomorrow.

  7. #7
    Cyburbian biscuit's avatar
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    My social interactions with others who hold dissenting viewpoints is likely pretty limited, but many of the people within my social circle, have the same basic issue stances as Suburb Repairman here. What is it about coming of age in the Reagan/Bush I years that has breed a generation of college educated young people to adopt a traditionally conservative fiscal stance coupled with what seems to be a form of social libertarianism?

  8. #8
    Cyburbian Brocktoon's avatar
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    I think very few people beliefs mirror that of the political parties in America. Most people tend to gravitate to one or two issues than tend not to be what is most important to them. For example, in Michigan I saw a politician win on the guns, god and gays platform over some who had a record of job creation and being a political moderate. Even though job creation was the most important thing in the district the gun god and gays candidate won.

    As for immigration, I think no party supports illegal immigration but both sides recognize that the current system does not work. If you look at the history of the issue it has caused the creation of a political party (the No-Nothings) and has had many attempts at a solution only for those that come to this country illegally to find other avenues. There is a huge demand for their services. It has been widely disproved that these people are here to do nothing but live of welfare. They are here to work. As for illegals in school I look at it as these kids are going to be other there learning, I would rather have it in a school than on the street.

    Whatever solution that passes it will fail in a manner not envisioned. The immigration reform passed by Reagan was going to be the cure all but did not work nor did the reforms passed in the 1960’s, 1920’s or the 1880’s.

    I think one thing our political process is lacking is a true exchange of ideas and willingness to compromise. Both sides are so concerned about creating politically palatable catch phrases that strike fear in their base that they are not willing to give a little to solve the problem. Immigration is a great example. A compromise bill is being proposed but the extremes on both sides say it goes too far on some issues and not far enough on others. That’s probably a good sign that it is moving in the correct direction.


    Whatever solution that passes it will fail in a manner not envisioned. The immigration reform passed by Reagan was going to be the cure all but did not work.
    "If you don't like change, you're going to like irrelevance even less" General Eric Shinseki

  9. #9
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    I agree with Brocktoon that it seems the current party platforms do not dovetail very well with a new generation of voters that have come to see key (and non-key) topics in a different manner than a generation ago.

    I read an article (where, i can't recall) recently that addressed this to some degree. The article was saying that the current schisms between Democrats and Republicans are essentially the playing out of the campus culture wars of the 1960's. I can just see them out there today - Hillary Clinton shouting across the protest barriers at Karl Rove tabling a booth for the Young Republicans. The article went on to suggest that many voters today (especially non-Baby Boomers) re growing tired of the same kinds of arguments about the same topics and that the intense standoff over these issues has prevented politicians from seeing that we live in a new age with new potentials and new areas of concern. I found it all very interesting and certainly on the mark for my own interests.

    I think I see that here in these postings as well - many feel that neither party relates well to personal stances on issues. It will be interesting to see what the next few elections do in terms of bringing new views and shifting the polictical dialogue in a new direction.

    As an aside, and since the topic has come up, I heard and interesting response to the 'illegal aliens are looking for a free ride with their calls for amnesty" point of view. The response was that illegals showed a dramatic increase in tax filings this past year and that the amnesty calls center around these folks becoming legitimate citizens that can pay taxes and othertwise contribute their share to society. In this sense, these calls are more for no longer getting a free ride rather than the other way around. An interesting point, I thought. My personal feeling is that these people are already here and working and, much like calls to legitimate the black and gray markets in developing countries, it allows us to benefit from an emergent tax base if made legit. It also sounds to me that this is an issue that cuts across both parties, though perhaps for different reasons.

    BTW, I still maintain my "no party affiliation" status which, though it means I can't vote in primaries, is more in line with my preferences. Not really a joiner, though I expect I will vote Democratic for this next presidential election (locally, things are not so clear cut).
    The purpose of life is a life of purpose

  10. #10
    moderator in moderation Suburb Repairman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by biscuit View post
    My social interactions with others who hold dissenting viewpoints is likely pretty limited, but many of the people within my social circle, have the same basic issue stances as Suburb Repairman here. What is it about coming of age in the Reagan/Bush I years that has breed a generation of college educated young people to adopt a traditionally conservative fiscal stance coupled with what seems to be a form of social libertarianism?
    That is very true and something I have noticed among my peers as well. I also think that is something true of almost every generation when they were in their mid-late 20s, such as the 60s free love rebellion, the excesses and "I do what I want" of the 80s, the "me" generation of the 90s/2000s. I believe this is particularly prevalent among college-educated because they look around and say "I earned this. I did what it took to attain some level of wealth and comfort; so can they."

    You can see pieces of that fiscal conservatism in some of my stances, but not nearly as pronounced as others among my peers--I have some friends that await the second coming of Reagan like he was the Jesus of government. I believe in a strong welfare system, but believe that the welfare system must make every effort to give people the tools necessary and remove barriers so that they no longer need welfare. I don't buy into the myth of the "welfare queen"; my preferred welfare reforms add to the program to make it more complete--I don't want some deadline/max amount when we aren't giving them all of the tools necessary.

    There are a TON of crunchy conservatives in my generation as well, probably because teaching about the environment really took off while my generation was in elementary school. I think a lot of the fiscal conservative mindsets come from parents that were in their prime working years and just starting families during the Reagan/Bush v.1 administrations, when money was tight and the oil crunch/S&L scandals hit.

    "Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country."

    - Herman Göring at the Nuremburg trials (thoughts on democracy)

  11. #11
    Cyburbian Greenescapist's avatar
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    Wow, this went from jread asking for people's opinions on his political positions- I think he's Democratic/Libertarian to people writing long lists of their own opinions.

    In any case, most people here are just preaching to the choir. I don't want to respond to everything others have said, but I will add:

    *I think progressive taxes are good. People who earn high sums of money can afford to pay a higher percentage.
    *Goverment should be made more efficient, but not cut on ideological bases (letting churches take care of things, etc).
    *Goverment should stay out of our bedrooms and our doctors' offices.
    *I don't believe the US has the capacity or ought to have the mission to democratize the world.
    *Immigration should be balanced and compassionate. We need immigrant labor for our economy and immigrants are an important (and future) part of our history. However, existing laws should be enforced.
    *The US has the obligation to push businesses to be more progressive to address climate change, energy shortages, etc- be it with market systems, taxes, regulations.
    *There could be so many more... but I'll stop for now.

  12. #12
    Cyburbian ofos's avatar
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    I'm unabashedly politically independent. Over the years, I've come to realize that I'm an environmental liberal, a fiscal conservative, a social moderate and favor gun control in urban, but not rural areas. I like my church to stay out of politics and my government to stay out of my church. I'm for equal rights if there are equal responsibilities.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally posted by Greenescapist View post
    <snip>
    *I think progressive taxes are good. People who earn high sums of money can afford to pay a higher percentage.
    <snip>
    Just an observation because I think it's an important point: It's not that the wealthy can afford to pay higher taxes, although that's true. It's that they gain more by the protections our national defense and system of government provide. Therefore they rightly should pay more.

  14. #14
    Cyburbian cch's avatar
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    I'm registered independent, but I've always voted democrat (except for when I voted Nader). I'm very liberal, all for legalizing gay marriage, weed and hookers (as long as the latter two are highly regulated), and support a woman's right to choose (although I personally could never live with myself if I ever had an abortion). But, I'm also pro death penalty when they are guilty of horrendous crimes without a shadow of a doubt, and I have a big issue with all the illegitimate children being born in this day and age, but I realize we can't really have any laws forcing people to stop having children out of wedlock. I'm a tree hugger. And I feel that welfare needs a major over-haul. I volunteer, but I don't agree with people relying on handouts.

    Anyway, Jread, I'd say you are independent, like me. I know, I took the easy answer.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    you will not be surprised to note that I am a self-contradiction!
    1. I am a registered Democrat but have voted in some state elections for the Republican
    2. I am a Roman Catholic but I am pro-choice because it's my religion's rules, not everyone else's and I believe in a separation of church and state
    3. I believe in the right to bear arms but I don't have a problem with registration requirements
    4. I believe in the right to zone if all registered voters get to vote on the zoning
    5. I believe if land is so sensitive due to environmental reasons, then it's in the public interest and the people should own it (and it's cheaper than regulating it)
    6. But I am embarrassed we have not signed the Kyoto Treaty or at least tried to explain better why we aren't signing it
    7. I am against the Iraq war but I am not completely anti-war - I am frightened to think we are guilty of war crimes
    8. I am queasy about the death penalty, except to anyone who participates in the Presidential primaries more than a year before the election (so that wipes them all out...)
    9. I am uneasy about the tax structure because I don't think there is a simple solution - we use tax policy to forward other policies which is mixed in with income - I think we try to do too much with tax policy, really
    10. I do think there is a role for government to assist those in need
    11. I think there is a role for government to be a leader in areas like energy policy (as in alternatives), education and transportation/mass transit/railroads
    12. I don't know what to do about the health care and pharmacy costs and if there should be a role of government in that solutions, but it needs address
    13. I think Social Security should remain - period, no excuses
    14. coming from Maine living, immigration means to me that I am sick of all these French Canadians yapping about hockey all the time while I am trying to talk about the NFL - I hate that, they must be stopped
    15. but I do believe in some measures for Homeland Security yet I am glad there are people like the ACLU as the check and balance
    16. I don't have a problem with same-sex unions under law
    17. I think elections are way out of hand with when they start and how much you need to run but I am not sure how we control that beyond the death penalty

  16. #16
    Cyburbian jread's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by cch View post
    Anyway, Jread, I'd say you are independent, like me. I know, I took the easy answer.
    I'm thinking that as well. After reading this thread I've found that I'm actually more Libertarian than I thought I was (I'm for a smaller government), but there are issues that Libertarians feel strongly about that I disagree with. For instance, Libertarians are very pro-gun and for Americans being armed (almost to a scary Republican level). They are also for open borders and for unrestricted land rights.. two things I strongly disagree with.

    Speaking of the illegal immigrant issue, I see a lot of responses on here about it from people that may not truly understand what it's like. I live in Central Texas and illegal immigration (and its associated problems) are thrown in my face every single day. You truly don't understand what it's really like until it's a part of your daily life and you live in an area where it is a problem: Texas, California, Southwestern U.S. in general.
    "I don't suffer from insanity... I enjoy every single minute of it!"

  17. #17
    Super Moderator luckless pedestrian's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jread View post

    Speaking of the illegal immigrant issue, I see a lot of responses on here about it from people that may not truly understand what it's like. I live in Central Texas and illegal immigration (and its associated problems) are thrown in my face every single day. You truly don't understand what it's really like until it's a part of your daily life and you live in an area where it is a problem: Texas, California, Southwestern U.S. in general.
    I know my ignorances and that's why I joked about it, because living near the Canadian border and the Atlantic time zone, I am clueless about this issue!

    Your political compass
    Economic Left/Right: -6.38
    Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.87
    Last edited by luckless pedestrian; 05 Jun 2007 at 5:48 PM. Reason: took the political test and found I am like Ghandi - who knew?

  18. #18
    Cyburbian KSharpe's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jread View post
    I'm thinking that as well. After reading this thread I've found that I'm actually more Libertarian than I thought I was (I'm for a smaller government), but there are issues that Libertarians feel strongly about that I disagree with. For instance, Libertarians are very pro-gun and for Americans being armed (almost to a scary Republican level). They are also for open borders and for unrestricted land rights.. two things I strongly disagree with.

    Speaking of the illegal immigrant issue, I see a lot of responses on here about it from people that may not truly understand what it's like. I live in Central Texas and illegal immigration (and its associated problems) are thrown in my face every single day. You truly don't understand what it's really like until it's a part of your daily life and you live in an area where it is a problem: Texas, California, Southwestern U.S. in general.
    J, I would like to hear more about this- what's it like for Americans along the border in terms of illegal immigrants? What problems are created?
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  19. #19
    Unfrozen Caveman Planner mendelman's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by KSharpe View post
    J, I would like to hear more about this- what's it like for Americans along the border in terms of illegal immigrants? What problems are created?
    Their lawns get mowed regularly, their burgers are served quickly, and we all get oranges for $0.60 per pound.

    Sorry.

    In order to see where you lean you could also take this oldy, but goody internet test - The Political Compass

    I think I generally lean Greenish/Libertarianish, because I am generally fiscally conservative, socially liberal, and environmentally liberal-ish.
    Last edited by mendelman; 05 Jun 2007 at 5:54 PM.
    I'm sorry. Is my bias showing?

    Let's not be didactic in this profession, because that is a path to disillusion and irrelevancy.

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  20. #20
    Cyburbian wahday's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by jread View post
    Speaking of the illegal immigrant issue, I see a lot of responses on here about it from people that may not truly understand what it's like. I live in Central Texas and illegal immigration (and its associated problems) are thrown in my face every single day. You truly don't understand what it's really like until it's a part of your daily life and you live in an area where it is a problem: Texas, California, Southwestern U.S. in general.
    While I agree with this to a certain degree (that is, that your locale has a lot to do with your perspective), it does underscore my feeling that when people talk about "illegal immigration" we are mostly thinking specifically about folks coming from Mexico. Certainly there is a fair share of illegal immigration from other nations as well - Chinese that end up working in US sweatshops, for example) - but this is really about our southern neighbors primarily.

    Anyway, living in New Mexico, we certainly have plenty of illegal immigration here. To be honest, though, it is to my eye impossible to tell those who are here illegally and those that are legit and so the degree to which it is a "problem" is not that clear to me personally. To be sure, there are plenty of Mexicans around - they are very strong in the construction business (the ubiquitous stucco crew, for example), though the owners may be legal, as well as small retail start-ups in certain parts of town.


    What are the issues you have experienced in Central Texas?

    Moderator note:
    Let's stay on topic. Not that you all don't have another good one, but you might want to start an AIB thread so this one can continue on course. - Mastiff
    Last edited by Mastiff; 05 Jun 2007 at 7:12 PM.
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  21. #21
    Cyburbian Mud Princess's avatar
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    Off-topic

    Quote Originally posted by luckless pedestrian View post
    you will not be surprised to note that I am a self-contradiction!
    I agree with a lot (not all) of what you listed, and my political compass score was very close too -

    Economic Left/Right: -5.50
    Social Liberatarian/Authoritarian: -4.87

  22. #22
    Cyburbian cch's avatar
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    I did the test:
    Economic Left/Right: -4.00
    Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.33

  23. #23
    Gunfighter Mastiff's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by michaelskis View post

    As for me:

    1) I think that when it some to any religious matter, the government should shut up and stay out of the way.

    2) I think that life starts at conception.

    3) I think that people should not use credit cards or go into debt for anything other than buying a house or business expenses.

    4) I think that we should changes to a consumption tax, where we only pay an increased sales tax. Therefore, those who buy more, will still pay more.
    I'm actually not surprised at how many points on which we agree. The four I've left (and numbered) I have at least a minor disagreement. Here's my responses:

    1) I think the government, the feds in particular, should stay out of most things. I do believe there are times and places for everything... so if some loon like Jim Jones comes along again, they can deal with it. Also, I'd prefer if religion would also stay out of politics...

    2) While I don't care where anyone believes life begins, and both camps have both reasonable and downright silly arguments, it shouldn't be used to form law and policy for everyone. I find that hampering stem cell research over personal beliefs, particularly religious, is bad for humanity as a whole, and harms the research community in the U.S.

    3) Truthfully, this problem is one of both borrower and lender. Too many young people get sucked into high interest cards early in life and have problems. I see a three part solution. First, revamp bankruptcy laws to hold people more accountable. Second, make the lender partially responsible, so if they hand out credit to risky people, they eat it. No passing it on to other borrowers or writing it off... (Don't get me started on corporations and personal responsibility.) Finally, every high school in the U.S. should require a course on personal finance for graduation.

    4) A consumption tax is fine, and I'm all for a national sales tax, but I'd use it in conjunction with a flat tax on income as well. Either way, it should cut the IRS by about 90%...
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    C'mon and get me you twist of fate
    I'm standing right here Mr. Destiny
    If you want to talk well then I'll relate
    If you don't so what cause you don't scare me

  24. #24
    I took that compass test:

    Economic Left/Right: -2.75
    Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 1.64

  25. #25
    Cyburbian Emeritus Bear Up North's avatar
    Registered
    May 2003
    Location
    Northwestern Ohio
    Posts
    9,327
    From the Bear.....

    1. I'm all for the government staying out of our personal lives. If I participate in bad habits, such as drinking or smoking.....my choice. If I own a bar and decide it should be "smoke free", that should be how it is. If I decide it should allow smoking, that is how it should be. FREEDOM. (And I have never smoked!)

    1. Abortion should be legal.

    1. Gay marriage, gay civil unions.....all should be legal. I don't care if two green males from outer space want to shack-up. "Ain't nobody's business but my own."

    1. End the idiotic waste-of-money drug war. Legalize drugs BUT allow any owner of any company to prohibit drug users from working at their place of employment. Contradiction? So what. If you chose to use drugs and prevent yourself from getting gainful work, tough shXX. FREEDOM.

    1. Strict separation of church and state.....YES! And, if we have to pay MAX taxes, the churches should also pay MAX taxes.

    2. Limited government involvement in income equalization.

    2. Provide education and make it economically rewarding (tax law changes) for corporations to provide health care coverage.

    3. Preserve the environment....yes.....but our definitions may go in different directions.

    3. Limit sprawl.....I am about to lose all my friends here.....the concept sounds good but, again, we probably have quite different definitions of how to apply this. (Pray for me, you heathens.....this Bear is NOT a planner..... )

    3. Equal funding for mass transit. This goes against my Libertarianish views, but, dang it, until we make it just as easy to take transit as it is to drive a car.....

    3. I have no opinion on "defining and enforcing growth boundaries". I don't understand it enough to have an opinion.

    4. Never fired a gun in my life. I'm for very-limited gun control.....registration. Criminals will always be able to get guns. (Stop throwing mary-jane users in jail and leave space for gun-toting criminals.)

    5. Because my grandparents were immigrants I have trouble with this topic. Yes, they were LEGAL.....what creeps at the soft side of my noggin is the notion that we are a country that can absorb immigrants.
    _____

    As usual, I scored in the Libertarianish side of the test.

    Bear

    TAX EDIT: Later thread posts mentioned the tax structure. I thought I would respond.....eliminate the income tax, develop flat tax or value-added tax......I know way too many people who are in the "undergound economy" and never pay a dime. If you buy something, you pay a tax.
    Last edited by Bear Up North; 05 Jun 2007 at 7:44 PM. Reason: Taxman
    Occupy Cyburbia!

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