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Thread: What non-planner writer fuels your planning fire?

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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    What non-planner writer fuels your planning fire?

    One of the unfortunate aspects of articles and books about planning, natural resource management, design, public adminstration and so forth is that the writers are knowledgeable about their subject but the writing is dull, or unimaginative, or academic, or just bad. These writers give us valuable ideas or information, but there is no art to it. There is no fire. No inspiration.

    I read them to learn, but not to be inspired.

    When I want to be inspired and better motivated to do my profession, I turn to writers who do not write about planning. They write about the land. They write about the water. They speak for the trees because the trees have no tongues (Dr. Seuss).

    I read Wallace Stegner. I read Aldo Leopold. I read Wendell Berry. I especially read John McPhee.

    Do any of you have favorite non-planner writers who help fuel your planning fire?
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

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    Cyburbian zman's avatar
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    Edward Abbey; mainly about western land use and development. Of course, he does not inspire me to be more regulatory...
    You get all squeezed up inside/Like the days were carved in stone/You get all wired up inside/And it's bad to be alone

    You can go out, you can take a ride/And when you get out on your own/You get all smoothed out inside/And it's good to be alone
    -Peart

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    Cyburbian Plus
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    Quote Originally posted by otterpop View post
    I read Wallace Stegner. I read Aldo Leopold. I read Wendell Berry. I especially read John McPhee.
    Quote Originally posted by zmanPLAN View post
    Edward Abbey...
    Another Vote for those writers.

    Add Barry Lopez - particularly Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape
    Oddball
    Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves?
    Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here?
    Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?
    From Kelly's Heroes (1970)


    Are you sure you're not hurt ?
    No. Just some parts wake up faster than others.
    Broke parts take a little longer, though.
    From Electric Horseman (1979)

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    Chairman of the bored Maister's avatar
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    Robert Putnam.
    People will miss that it once meant something to be Southern or Midwestern. It doesn't mean much now, except for the climate. The question, “Where are you from?” doesn't lead to anything odd or interesting. They live somewhere near a Gap store, and what else do you need to know? - Garrison Keillor

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    Cyburbian otterpop's avatar
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    Quote Originally posted by JNA View post
    Add Barry Lopez - particularly Home Ground: Language for an American Landscape
    Another great writer. River Notes: Dance of Herons. I enjoyed that one.
    "I am very good at reading women, but I get into trouble for using the Braille method."

    ~ Otterpop ~

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    Cyburbian estromberg's avatar
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    As a government employee, I am influenced by George Orwell's 1984 and I am doing my part to make it come true.

    Just kidding. I have read books about pollution related to industry like A Civil Action. Unfortunately, they usually just make me more jaded to the well greased wheels of business and development that roll over everything in their path.

    A previous poster mentioned Dr. Suess, The Lorax is still one of my favorite Dr. Suess books. I remember when I was in grade school, we saw it as a movie, back when they still used projectors instead of vcrs/dvds.

  7. #7
         
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    Early in my planning career books like Marc Reisner's Cadillac Desert and Raye Ringholz's Uranium Frenzy really helped me understand the mind set of many of the developers and citizens I worked with in western Colorado. Kunstler also helped me look at suburban development with a more critical eye.

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